• 1.Workplace Bullying and Harassment Jess Booth- HR Club Sydney
  • 2. What is bullying at work?
    • Bullying is regarded as repeatedunreasonable behaviour , where the behaviours cause,orhave the potential to cause harm.
    Sources:Einarsen et al., 2003; Workcover NSW, 2008; Worksafe Victoria, 2003;http://www.beyondbullying.com.au/bb_what.html
  • 3. What could be considered unreasonable behaviour?
    • Name calling, insults or intimidation
    • Isolation (Social or Physical)
    • Overwork
    • Undermining behaviours
    • Yelling and shouting
    • Spreading malicious rumours and gossiping
    • Excessive, unjustified or unreasonable monitoring of work
    • Repeated unreasonable assignment of duties which are obviously unfavourable to a particular individual
    • Withholding or denying access to necessary information, consultation or other resources
  • 4. What could be consideredharassment?
    • Offensive jokes, suggestive or degrading comments
    • Unwanted advances or continual invitations for dates
    • Offensive physical contact
    • Offensive pictures, posters or written material
    • Threatening, abusive or offensive calls, letters, emails or SMS messages
  • 5. What’s the difference?
    • Harassment - used to describe behaviour of a discriminatory nature (used in anti-discrimination legislation)
    • Bullying - used to describe behaviours that are unreasonablebut which cannot be prosecuted under anti-discrimination legislation. 
  • 6. Discrimination
    • Can be
    • Direct - due to personal attributes such as race, sex, age etc
    • Indirect-treating people in the same way which disadvantages a specific group of people
    Source:http://www.workplace.gov.au/workplace/Organisation/Employer/EmployerResponsibilities/Avoidingdiscriminationinemployment.htm
  • 7. It’s about balance Does the person feel offended, intimidated or humiliated? Would a ‘reasonable person’ have anticipated the behaviour would offend, intimidate or humiliate the person involved?
  • 8. Intent is irrelevant!
  • 9. Is this really still happening in Australia? Source:http://www.careerone.com.au/media/documents/press-releases/CareerOne-Bullies-in-the-workplace.pdf 74% bullied 57% workwith a bully One Third Sexually Harassed
  • 10. Case Example
    • Ballarat radio station was fined $50,000 plus court costs
    • The individual was fined $10,000 and ordered to pay costs of $1,700
    Source:http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/07/22/1090464796542.html
  • 11. How does this impact people? Source:http://www.careerone.com.au/media/documents/press-releases/CareerOne-Bullies-in-the-workplace.pdf
    • Fear/Stress/Anxiety
    • Depression
    • Physical symptoms
    • Loss of motivation, concentration, self-confidence and morale
    • Financial costs
  • 12. How does this impact the organisation?
    • Reduced efficiency, productivity and profitability
    • Increased absenteeism/ staff turnover
    • Unsafe work environment/stress claims
    • Adverse publicity
    • Preventative and
    • reactive financial costs
    • Inhibits innovation and
    • creativity
  • 13. ExamplesSource:http://intranet.csiro.au/intranet/hr/policy/eo/harass/detExamples.asp
  • 14. Most people think this doesn’t apply to them but it includes:
    • insulting or threatening gestures;
    • continual unjustified and unnecessary comments about a person's work or capacity for work;
    • the display of pictures, publications, graffiti, or the performance of entertainment at staff functions in the workplace that are perceived to be offensive;
    • unwelcome physical contact;
    • suggestions that sexual conduct is relevant to employment or promotion, and conditional to benefits or rewards being received;
    • sexual assault and rape;
    • threats of, or actual assault;
    • persistent following or stalking within the workplace, or to and from work;
    • continual jokes about food preferences;
    • attributing of stereotypical or extreme behaviour to a particular group;
    • interrogation or teasing someone about their sexual activities or private life;
    • verbal comments, jokes and innuendo that are perceived to be offensive;
    • rude, belittling or sarcastic comments;
    • abusive, belittling or intimidating phone calls, emails, notes etc;
    • offensive physical contact or coercive behaviour which is intended to be derogatory or intimidating;
    • phone calls, letters or messages on electronic mail or computer networks which are threatening, abusive or offensive;
    • dismissive treatment;
    • unjustified and unreasonable exclusion of a person or group from normal conversation, work assignments, work related social activities and networks in the workplace;
    • disparaging remarks about malingering made to other staff;
    • inappropriate practical jokes played on people;
    • overbearing or abusive behaviour towards staff;
    • staring and leering;
    • baiting or unreasonable teasing;
    • publicly belittling someone's opinions, or dismissing their contribution without good reason, including in front of clients and work colleagues; and
    • abuse of management or supervisory power such as:
      • excessive and unreasonable work scrutiny;
      • inappropriate or unreasonable criticism of someone's work or behaviour;
      • constantly and inappropriately changing and/or setting impossible deadlines, tasks or targets;
      • inappropriate or unreasonable blocking of promotion, training, development or other work opportunities; and
      • branding as a troublemaker a person who raises legitimate workplace grievances, and taking no action to address the grievance.
    • interference with a person's workspace, work materials, equipment or personal property, apart from that which is necessary for the ongoing work of the business unit;
  • 15. What it isn’t
    • As long as they are accurate, constructive and courteous (i.e. not threatening or humiliating); reasonable management decisions, discussions or actions are considered to be bullying or harassment (and this includes performance management).
    • Similarly, occasional differences of opinion, conflicts and working relationship issues are part of working life and generally do not constitute harassment/bullying.
  • 16. What action should staff take in response to bullying/harassment?
    • Keep detailed records about the incidents
    • Talk about it with someone who can provide assistance suchas your Manager, HR staff or an Equity and Diversity Officer.
    • If you feel comfortable let the bully know that their behaviour makes you feel uncomfortable
    • Do not retaliate- and walk away from the situation if it becomes out of control
    • Seek resolution - informal or formal process
  • 17. Who can I speak to?
    • Senior Management, Immediate Supervisor or next level Manager
    • HR Manager/Advisor
    • Union representative
    • Health & Safety Representatives
    • Employee Assistance Programs
    • Equity and Diversity Officers
  • 18. What can I do?
    • Be self aware
    • Accept feedback and proactively seek it
    • Remember, intent is irrelevant
  • 19. Resources
    • Diversity Council Australia
    • Beyond Bullying
    • Blog Post on Workplace Bullying
    Please download to view
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    Bullying And Harassment

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    A powerpoint presentation on Bullying and Harassment in Australia.
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    • 1.Workplace Bullying and Harassment Jess Booth- HR Club Sydney
  • 2. What is bullying at work?
    • Bullying is regarded as repeatedunreasonable behaviour , where the behaviours cause,orhave the potential to cause harm.
    Sources:Einarsen et al., 2003; Workcover NSW, 2008; Worksafe Victoria, 2003;http://www.beyondbullying.com.au/bb_what.html
  • 3. What could be considered unreasonable behaviour?
    • Name calling, insults or intimidation
    • Isolation (Social or Physical)
    • Overwork
    • Undermining behaviours
    • Yelling and shouting
    • Spreading malicious rumours and gossiping
    • Excessive, unjustified or unreasonable monitoring of work
    • Repeated unreasonable assignment of duties which are obviously unfavourable to a particular individual
    • Withholding or denying access to necessary information, consultation or other resources
  • 4. What could be consideredharassment?
    • Offensive jokes, suggestive or degrading comments
    • Unwanted advances or continual invitations for dates
    • Offensive physical contact
    • Offensive pictures, posters or written material
    • Threatening, abusive or offensive calls, letters, emails or SMS messages
  • 5. What’s the difference?
    • Harassment - used to describe behaviour of a discriminatory nature (used in anti-discrimination legislation)
    • Bullying - used to describe behaviours that are unreasonablebut which cannot be prosecuted under anti-discrimination legislation. 
  • 6. Discrimination
    • Can be
    • Direct - due to personal attributes such as race, sex, age etc
    • Indirect-treating people in the same way which disadvantages a specific group of people
    Source:http://www.workplace.gov.au/workplace/Organisation/Employer/EmployerResponsibilities/Avoidingdiscriminationinemployment.htm
  • 7. It’s about balance Does the person feel offended, intimidated or humiliated? Would a ‘reasonable person’ have anticipated the behaviour would offend, intimidate or humiliate the person involved?
  • 8. Intent is irrelevant!
  • 9. Is this really still happening in Australia? Source:http://www.careerone.com.au/media/documents/press-releases/CareerOne-Bullies-in-the-workplace.pdf 74% bullied 57% workwith a bully One Third Sexually Harassed
  • 10. Case Example
    • Ballarat radio station was fined $50,000 plus court costs
    • The individual was fined $10,000 and ordered to pay costs of $1,700
    Source:http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2004/07/22/1090464796542.html
  • 11. How does this impact people? Source:http://www.careerone.com.au/media/documents/press-releases/CareerOne-Bullies-in-the-workplace.pdf
    • Fear/Stress/Anxiety
    • Depression
    • Physical symptoms
    • Loss of motivation, concentration, self-confidence and morale
    • Financial costs
  • 12. How does this impact the organisation?
    • Reduced efficiency, productivity and profitability
    • Increased absenteeism/ staff turnover
    • Unsafe work environment/stress claims
    • Adverse publicity
    • Preventative and
    • reactive financial costs
    • Inhibits innovation and
    • creativity
  • 13. ExamplesSource:http://intranet.csiro.au/intranet/hr/policy/eo/harass/detExamples.asp
  • 14. Most people think this doesn’t apply to them but it includes:
    • insulting or threatening gestures;
    • continual unjustified and unnecessary comments about a person's work or capacity for work;
    • the display of pictures, publications, graffiti, or the performance of entertainment at staff functions in the workplace that are perceived to be offensive;
    • unwelcome physical contact;
    • suggestions that sexual conduct is relevant to employment or promotion, and conditional to benefits or rewards being received;
    • sexual assault and rape;
    • threats of, or actual assault;
    • persistent following or stalking within the workplace, or to and from work;
    • continual jokes about food preferences;
    • attributing of stereotypical or extreme behaviour to a particular group;
    • interrogation or teasing someone about their sexual activities or private life;
    • verbal comments, jokes and innuendo that are perceived to be offensive;
    • rude, belittling or sarcastic comments;
    • abusive, belittling or intimidating phone calls, emails, notes etc;
    • offensive physical contact or coercive behaviour which is intended to be derogatory or intimidating;
    • phone calls, letters or messages on electronic mail or computer networks which are threatening, abusive or offensive;
    • dismissive treatment;
    • unjustified and unreasonable exclusion of a person or group from normal conversation, work assignments, work related social activities and networks in the workplace;
    • disparaging remarks about malingering made to other staff;
    • inappropriate practical jokes played on people;
    • overbearing or abusive behaviour towards staff;
    • staring and leering;
    • baiting or unreasonable teasing;
    • publicly belittling someone's opinions, or dismissing their contribution without good reason, including in front of clients and work colleagues; and
    • abuse of management or supervisory power such as:
      • excessive and unreasonable work scrutiny;
      • inappropriate or unreasonable criticism of someone's work or behaviour;
      • constantly and inappropriately changing and/or setting impossible deadlines, tasks or targets;
      • inappropriate or unreasonable blocking of promotion, training, development or other work opportunities; and
      • branding as a troublemaker a person who raises legitimate workplace grievances, and taking no action to address the grievance.
    • interference with a person's workspace, work materials, equipment or personal property, apart from that which is necessary for the ongoing work of the business unit;
  • 15. What it isn’t
    • As long as they are accurate, constructive and courteous (i.e. not threatening or humiliating); reasonable management decisions, discussions or actions are considered to be bullying or harassment (and this includes performance management).
    • Similarly, occasional differences of opinion, conflicts and working relationship issues are part of working life and generally do not constitute harassment/bullying.
  • 16. What action should staff take in response to bullying/harassment?
    • Keep detailed records about the incidents
    • Talk about it with someone who can provide assistance suchas your Manager, HR staff or an Equity and Diversity Officer.
    • If you feel comfortable let the bully know that their behaviour makes you feel uncomfortable
    • Do not retaliate- and walk away from the situation if it becomes out of control
    • Seek resolution - informal or formal process
  • 17. Who can I speak to?
    • Senior Management, Immediate Supervisor or next level Manager
    • HR Manager/Advisor
    • Union representative
    • Health & Safety Representatives
    • Employee Assistance Programs
    • Equity and Diversity Officers
  • 18. What can I do?
    • Be self aware
    • Accept feedback and proactively seek it
    • Remember, intent is irrelevant
  • 19. Resources
    • Diversity Council Australia
    • Beyond Bullying
    • Blog Post on Workplace Bullying
  • Fly UP