+ Sunnyside District Day One Math Training Focus 2; Training for Teachers by Math Leaders; Fall 2014.

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Moya Elementary

Sunnyside District Day One Math TrainingFocus 2; Training for Teachers by Math Leaders; Fall 2014

+Anticipatory SetWhat do you notice are some differences between the previous state standards and the common core standards?

What are some challenges you are facing while implementing the common core standards?2+ActivityFast Fingers---Fast Mind

3+Something to Ponder..Mathematics can be defined simply as the science of patterns. David Sousa

The brain is a pattern-making machine. Peter Diamandis

4+5

Are you

Good at Math?ORBad at Math?

What evidence do you have to support your answer?5

Math is in our nature!Because we are born with number sense, most of us have the potential to be a lot better at arithmetic and mathematics than we think. David Sousa6+The common core standards demand a balance between procedural skill and conceptual understanding.7+Why the need for change in instruction?Common Core Content Standard:Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.8+8Whats different in the new standards?Arizona (3rd)-- Compare and order benchmark fractions. CC 3rd Grade3.NF.2a Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.9+How are the standards different?First Grade:PO 3. Represent a word problem requiring addition or subtraction facts using an equation.

1.OA.7 Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.

10+CCSS Math ShiftsFocusCoherenceRigorProcedural Skill and FluencyConceptual UnderstandingApplication of Math Standards+FocusCritical Areas: The common core authors defined the most important concepts for each grade level.

Closely read your grade-level critical areas and discuss with your team.Create a bulleted list for each critical area that highlights the main points of each.

12+CoherenceRead through the standards on your Coherence handout and consider the following:How is your grade level connected to the grade above and below?

What do you have to limit in your teaching to follow the coherence?13+Coherence K-2K.NBT.1. Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones. 1.NBT.2. Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases: 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones called a ten. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones). 2.NBT.1 Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases: 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens called a hundred. The numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).

14+Division Skill Progression3.OA.2 Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 8. 4.NBT.6 Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models. 5.NBT.6 Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models. 6.NS.2 Fluently divide multi-digit numbers using the standard algorithm. +ReflectionBased on the differences between the old and new standards, what changes might you need to make in your classroom?16+Standards StudyWhen reading a standard, think about:What are the procedures/skills students need to learn during instruction?What are the conceptual understandings that students need to have during instruction (what do they need to explain)?What are the details in the standard that will guide how far I go with it? Example: Only use denominators 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 (3rd grade).

+DefinitionsProcedures : A list of the skills that students will master while learning this standard. Its what they will do with the math.

Concepts: A list of what students will understand while learning this standard. Its what they will explain about the math.

18+Example of Standards Study4.NF.7 Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or

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