Addressing Noncognitive Barriers to Learning

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Addressing Noncognitive Barriers to Learning. Carl E. Paternite, Center for School-Based Mental Health Programs (Miami University) and the Ohio Mental Health Network for School Success Diana Leigh, Center for Learning Excellence (The Ohio State University) - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Addressing Noncognitive Barriers to LearningCarl E. Paternite, Center for School-Based Mental Health Programs (Miami University) and the Ohio Mental Health Network for School SuccessDiana Leigh, Center for Learning Excellence (The Ohio State University)and the Ohio Mental Health Network for School SuccessKay Rietz, Ohio Department of Mental Health (Columbus)Terre Garner, Ohio Federation for Childrens Mental Health (Cincinnati)David Estrop, Superintendent, Lakewood City School District (Lakewood)2004 Capital Conference Columbus, OhioNovember 9, 2004To help Ohios school districts, community-based agencies, and families work together to achieve improved educational and developmental outcomes for all children especially those at emotional or behavioral risk and those with mental health problems.MissionThe Ohio Mental Health Network for School SuccessAction AgendaCreate awareness about the gap between childrens mental health needs and treatment resources, and encourage improved and expanded services (including new anti-stigma campaign).Partner with regional action networks to enhance within-region implementation of the action agenda, actively soliciting student and family input. Also, contribute to statewide efforts (e.g., training institutes, workshops, research, etc.).Conduct surveys of mental health agencies, families, and school districts to better define the mental health needs of children and to gather information about promising practices.The Ohio Mental Health Network for School SuccessAction Agenda (continued)Provide training and technical assistance to mental health agencies and school districts, to support adoption of evidence-based and promising practices, including improvement and expansion of school-based mental health services.Develop a guide for education and mental health professionals and families, for the development of productive partnerships.The Ohio Mental Health Network for School SuccessAction Agenda (continued)Assist in identification of sources of financial support for school-based mental health initiatives.Assist university-based professional preparation programs in psychology, social work, public health, and education, in developing inter-professional strategies and practices for addressing the mental health needs of school-age children.School-Based Mental HealthFull array of mental health care for youth in special and regular educationScreening and assessmentTreatmentCase managementPrevention (all levels)Mental health promotionRelated ServicesClassroom observationConsultationTraining with school staff, families, and community membersSchool wide initiatives (e.g., media, outreach, climate)SBMH and the No Child Left Behind Mandate:Two Important Goals Achievement and Wellbeing 1) Achievement promotes wellbeing 2) Wellbeing promotes achievement School philosophy often acknowledges 1 but fails to acknowledge 2(CSMHA)School Effectiveness in Promoting Achievement and the NCLB MandateLeast effective: Limited focus on academic and nonacademic barriersMore effective: Focus on academic barriersMost effective: Integrated Focus on academic and nonacademic barriers(CSMHA)Non-academic barriers to learning exert a powerful negative influenceEnvironmentalPoor nutritionFamily stressFamily conflictPeer influencesExposure to violenceAbuse, NeglectPoor school environmentPersonalAttentional difficultiesBehavioral problemsDepressionAnxietySocial problemsTrauma reactions(CSMHA)See HandoutSee HandoutReport of Presidents New Freedom Commission on Mental Healthhttp://www.mentalhealthcommission.govthe mental health delivery system is fragmented and in disarrayleading to unnecessary and costly disability, homelessness, school failure and incarceration.Unmet needs and barriers to care include (among others):Fragmentation and gaps in care for children.Lack of national priority for mental health and suicide prevention. July, 2003The Crisis of Youth Mental HealthAbout 20% of youth, ages 9 to 17 (15 million), have diagnosable mental health disorders, (and many more are at risk or could benefit from help)Between 9-13% of youth, ages 9-17 years, meet the federal (not special ed.) definition of serious emotional disturbance (SED)The Crisis of Youth Mental HealthLess than 30% of youth with diagnosable disorder receive any service, and, of those who do, less than half receive adequate Tx (even fewer at risk receive help)For the small percentage of youth who do receive service, most actually receive it within a school setting.New Freedom Commission on Mental HealthGoal 4: Early Mental Health Screening, Assessment, and Referral to Services are Common Practice4.1 Promote the mental health of young children.4.2 Improve and expand school mental health programs.4.3 Screen for co-occurring mental and substance use disorders and link with integrated treatment strategies.4.4 Screen for mental disorders in primary health care, across the lifespan, and connect to treatment and supports. New Freedom Commission on Mental HealthCritical importance of partnership with schoolsin mental health care:The mission of public schools is to educate all students. However, children with serious emotional disturbances have the highest rates of school failure. Fifty percent of these student drop out of high school, compared to 30 percent of all students with disabilities. While schools are primarily concerned with education, mental health is essential to learning as well as to social and emotional development. Because of this important interplay between emotional health and school success, schools must be partners in the mental health care of our children. July, 2003, p. 58SBMH AdvantagesAccess to youthReduced stigma; Increased youth/family comfortOutreach to youth with internalizing problemsEnhanced ability to promote generalizationEnhanced capacity for prevention/MH promotionSBMH AdvantagesMoves toward MHEducation systems integration, providing critical support to education, and enhancing access to youth for mental health careExpands and connects education and mental health knowledge bases and promotes interdisciplinary collaborationAssists in the development and delivery of a true system of careSBMH Impacts/OutcomesBased on growing knowledge base, there is evidence that SBMH, when done wellAssists in reaching underserved youthIs associated with strong satisfaction by diverse stakeholder groups (e.g., teachers, students, families)Improves student outcomes (e.g., behavior, attendance, connectedness to school, school success)Improves school outcomes (e.g., climate, special education referrals)In Schools Without SBMHBarriers to mental health care are more pronouncedThere are pressures to increase referrals to special education for students to receive MH careMH care within special education is generally very far from achieving principles associated with best practice, including:short latency between referral and treatmenttreatment by well trained providersadequate duration of treatmentconnection of treatment to quality improvement and empirically supported practiceReduced effectiveness in fulfilling the mandates of NCLBIn Addition to Parents, Teachers are on the Mental Health Front LineYet, teachers/educators are very poorly trained in problem recognition and mental health promotionSignificant need to enhance teacher/educator training based on analysis of issues confronted in the classroom/schoolRelated significant need to enhance training of mental health professionals to prepare them to engage with educators and function effectively in/with schoolsOhios Mental Health, Schools, and Families Shared Agenda Initiativehttp://www.units.muohio.edu/csbmhp/sharedagenda.htmlPhase 1Statewide forum for leaders of mental health, education, and family policymaking organizations and child-serving systems(March 3, 2003)Phase 2Six regional forums for policy implementers and consumer stakeholders (April-May, 2003)Phase 3Legislative forum involving key leadership of relevant house and senate committees (October 9, 2003)Phase 4Ongoing policy/funding advocacy and technical assistance to promote attention to the crucial links between mental health and school successGuiding Principles for a Mental Health,Schools, Families Shared AgendaMental health is crucial to school successThere are shared opportunities for mental health, schools, students and families to work together more effectivelySee Handout - Shared Agenda ReportLegislative Forum On Mental Health and School SuccessCreating A Shared Agenda In OhioOctober 9, 2003Legislative Forum On Mental Health and School SuccessCreating A Shared Agenda In OhioOctober 9, 2003Legislative Forum On Mental Health and School SuccessCreating A Shared Agenda In OhioOctober 9, 2003Comments from Legislators Following the TestimonyFrom Representative Joyce Beatty (Member House Education Committee)In a question/challenge to fellow legislative panelists:Is there legislation that we should be looking at?From Representative Arlene Setzer (Chair, House Education Committee)In response to Representative Beatty:During this whole process I was also taking notesbecause, as you indicated there have been some specifics provided to us which we truly need many times when looking at legislationas most of you know currently the House and the Senate are working on Senate Bill 2 which is forteacher success and identifying highly qualified teachers...I am going to guide that discussion around some of the things that I have heard today about the idea that teachers need to understand regardless of what their teaching assignment might beComments from Legislators Following the Student TestimonyFrom Senator Bill Harris (Chair, Senate Finance Committee)I listened to the very brave and courageous young people tell us about things of their life. And as you were explaining that to us I am thinking about my sons, I am thinking about my grandchildren, I am thinking about other people that I know and some of the struggles that they haveFrom Representative Joyce Beatty (Member, House Education Committee)All of the student panel members, I dont think I have ever heard anything so compelling and moving and informative and educating in my entire life. So let me say to you thank you and let me give it to you with that smile that can be comforting because you have helped usPhase 4: An Immediate Legislative OutcomeSenate Bill 2Section 3319.61(E)(effective June 9, 2004)The standards for educator professional development developed under division (A) (3) of this section shall include standards that address the crucial link between academic achievement and mental health issues.One of Several Phase 4 Steps for Ohios Shared Agenda InitiativeExpansion of Ohios Positive Behavior Support Initiative will continue through collaborative efforts of: Special Education Regional Resource Centers The Ohio Association of Elementary School Administrators The Ohio Association of Secondary School AdministratorsMental Health and School Success WebsitesNational:National Association of State Directors of Special Education(www.nasdse.org)Center for School Mental Health Assistance (CSMHA, http://csmha.umaryland.edu)Center for Mental Health in Schools(http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu)Ohio:Center for School-Based Mental Health Programs(http://www.units.muohio.edu/csbmhp)Center for Learning Excellence, Alternative Education and Mental Health Projects(http://altedmh.osu.edu/omhn/omhn.htm)Ohios Shared Agenda Initiative(http://www.units.muohio.edu/csbmhp/sharedagenda.html) This PowerPoint Presentation is posted on Ohios Shared Agenda websitehttp://www.units.muohio.edu/csbmhp/sharedagenda.htmlInstitute of Medicine (1989). Research on Children and Adolescents with Mental, Behavioral and Developmental Disorders: Mobilizing a National Initiative and Surgeon Generals Report (1999).Childrens Defense Fund. Estimation Methodology for Children with a Serious Emotional Disturbance and The Center for Mental Health Services (1998).Mandersheidd & Sopnnenschein (1996). Mental Health, United States, 1996.Per Adelman and Taylor, 10% doing well,10% in special ed., 80% having barriers to learning and at riskInstitute of Medicine (1989). Research on Children and Adolescents with Mental, Behavioral and Developmental Disorders: Mobilizing a National Initiative and Surgeon Generals Report (1999).Childrens Defense Fund. Estimation Methodology for Children with a Serious Emotional Disturbance and The Center for Mental Health Services (1998).Mandersheidd & Sopnnenschein (1996). Mental Health, United States, 1996.Per Adelman and Taylor, 10% doing well,10% in special ed., 80% having barriers to learning and at risk

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