Collaboration Why is it important? What does it look like? How do we make it happen? What is it?

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CollaborationWhy is it important?What does it look like?How do we make it happen?What is it?K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitFor yearsSchool librarians had many hoops they thought were important!K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitTeaching how to care for books.Teaching the Dewey system.Teaching author, title, and subject cards in the card catalog.Understanding the importance of stamping the due date on the date due card.Understanding the importance of library-user signatures on those little cards in the back of each book.Ordering books that might support the curriculum.All done in isolation without direct knowledge of (or involvement in) classroom activities or direct input from the teachers!K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitWhat Hoop Is Important for School Librarians Today?K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitEstablishing and Maintaining Information Literate Technology-Rich Programs That are aligned with the curriculumK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaboration MeansTeacher(s) and library media specialist(s) teaching togetherTeacher - responsible for content Library Media Specialist - responsible for information literacy and technologyTeacher(s) and library media specialist(s) assessing student learning togetherstudent mastery of contentstudent mastery of the process (information literacy skills)K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitClassroom TeachersLibrary Media SpecialistK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitClassroom TeachersLibrary Media SpecialistIntegrated curriculum linking content, information literacy, and technologyK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaboration supportsConstructivist learningStudents building new knowledge ScaffoldingInformation explosionTechnology integrationStudent achievement State standardized achievement testsSAT/ACTReading End-of-Course testingK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaboration supportsEvaluationSchools/Districts (State Report Card)TeachersLibrary Media SpecialistsLibrary Media CentersK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaborationWhy Is It Important? More is accomplished jointly than could have been individually.Mattessich, Paul and Barbara R. Monsey. Collaboration: What Makes it Work: a Review of Research Literature on Factors Influencing Successful Children. Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 1992.K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitSteps to CollaborationCooperationCoordinationCollaborationNo InvolvementFull IntegrationK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitSteps to CollaborationCoordination is informal. No commonly defined goals or planning effort. No communication between the classroom-based teachers and library media specialist. Activities in the media center coordinate with topics the media specialist thinks are being taught in the classroom.K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitSteps to CollaborationCooperation is a more formal working relationship. Some communication between the teacher and the media specialist exists. No formal curriculum planning. Teacher often asks for resources to be checked out for use in the classroom. Media specialist continues to coordinate library instruction which is now based on requests from teacher.K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitSteps to CollaborationCollaboration is a formal working relationship. Communication channels exist between the teacher and the media specialist exists. Joint effort in curriculum design. Classroom and media center instruction planned and delivered jointly.K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaboration isTeacher(s) and library media specialist(s) planning togetherDeterming what students need to knowTeaching how to access informationTeaching how to evaluate informationTeaching how to interpret informationTeaching how to apply informationK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaboration meansTeacher(s) and library media specialist(s) jointly plan how and where the lesson(s) will be taughtplan the content, the information literacy skills, and technology skills to be includedplan how these skills relate to the contentdecide each person's role(s) and responsibilitiesK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaboration Moves FromCompeting to consensus building Working alone to including others from different fields and backgrounds Thinking mostly about activities and programs to thinking about larger results and strategies Focusing on short-term accomplishments to requiring long-term results K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitBenefits of CollaborationK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitStudents BenefitsLearning turned into actionInvolved in learningExcited about learningTransfer of learningIndependent use of relevant, integrated information & technology skillsConnections between subject areasIndependent learner-information and technology literateImproved student achievementK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitTeacher Benefits"Two heads are better than one"Lightens teaching loadMakes teaching more effectiveRenews excitement about teachingProvides additional resources for classroom instructionAssists with interdisciplinary instructionImproves student achievementK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitBenefits for Library Media SpecialistsChanges others perceptions of who the media specialist is and what he/she can doTeacherTechnologistProgram AdministratorIntegrates library media center resources and instruction into curriculumK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitExpands leadership role of library media specialistCreates advocates for the library media specialist Renews (or creates!) excitement about library media centerImproves student achievementBenefits for Library Media SpecialistsK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitAdministrator BenefitsChanges perception of who the LMS is and what the library media specialist can doIntegrates library media resources and instruction into curriculum (Return On Investment)Expands connections to communityImproves student achievementK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaborationMaking it happenK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitRoadblocks to CollaborationPerception of the role of the library media specialist By AdministratorsBy TeachersBy Library Media SpecialistLibrary Media Center scheduleSchool Master ScheduleLibrary Media Center staffK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitOvercoming the RoadblocksStart smallBe enthusiasticBuild rapport and trustOffer to serve on curriculum planning committeesBegin/expand dialogue with principalK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitOvercoming the RoadblocksKeep all stakeholders informedCompile bibliographies and research guidesDevelop a curriculum mapDevelop a collection mapKNOW the curriculum and content standards and DEMONSTRATE that knowledge!K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitOvercoming the RoadblocksTeach students in front of teachers Offer professional development classesResearch issues that affect teachingBuild library media center professional collectionModel/teach effective use of technologyK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitFor collaboration to work...School environment must be positive and supportive.Media specialist must be seen as a part of "the group."Media specialist must be a part of the decision-making process.Communication must be open, two-way, and continuous.Vision and purpose of the media center must be shared with all stakeholders.Media center must have adequate and up-to-date resources that are aligned with the schools curriculum.K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaborate SuccessfullyKnow where you're going;if you're unclear about some of the issues, talk with knowledgeable associatesBuild relationships and alliances. Know who the key players are and what their priorities are. Find out how to help them.Disarm the opposition. Understand where potential opponents stand and why. Get their perspectives and learn from them.Practice win/win when problem-solving. Your ultimate objective is student achievement.K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaborate SuccessfullyRespect individual strengthsAdvertise your successes, esp. word-of-mouthRemain flexibleBe willing to compromiseKeep on keepin' on!K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitCollaborationEnsures that learners have access to relevant resources at the point of instructional needProvides professional development for faculty, staff, and administratorsK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitImprovedStudent AchievementCollaboration+Reading Literacy+Information & Technological LiteracyK-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitBibliographyBuzzeo, Toni. Collaborating to Meet Standards: Teacher/ Librarian Partnerships for K-6. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing, 2002.Donham, Jean. Enhancing Teaching and Learning: A Leadership Guide for School Library Media Specialists. New York, NY: Neal- Schuman Publishers, 1998.Noah, Carolyn B. and Linda W. Braun. The Browsable Classroom: An introduction to E-Learning for Librarians. New York, NY: Neal- Schuman Publishers, 2002.Olrich, Karen Browne. Making Flexible Access and Flexible Scheduling Work Today. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 2001.Thomas, Melody. "What Is Collaboration to You?" Library Talk 15, no. 2 (March/April 2002): 17-18.Tschamler, Addie. "Top Secret: Collaborative Efforts Really Do Make a Difference." Library Talk 15, no. 2 (March/April 2002): 14-16.K-12 Information Literacy/Technology Education Integration Plan ToolkitHow nice it was from the beginning you just said it here are the hoops are to jump through. Obviously you knew which hoops were more important. And they all jumped just as you asked them to do.Jumping will now begin, research is done this wayno other way.These were the hoops we built in the library. We worked alone. Librarians determined what was important to know about the library an its operation. How many worksheets were printed on the purple ditto machines with pictures of card catalog drawers never thinking that the students might learn more if they actually touching the card catalog.It was the library budget. We decided on the books. We made up the rules.How nice it was from the beginning you just said it here are the hoops are to jump through. Obviously you knew which hoops were more important. And they all jumped just as you asked them to do.Jumping will now begin, research is done this wayno other way.AASL, in 1994 sponsored a 5 day institute. Titled Meeting in the Middle, the institute was intended to foster collaboration among librarians, administrators, and teachers.These definitions were determined at the institute. They all begin with the letter C, however, the difference between these Cs is the difference between the library almost in isolation to the program we seek today. Eight years ago. What was the status of collaboration in your school in 1994? Has collaboration increased? Part of the outcome from the institute was to define Collaboration, and identify the difference between cooperation, coordination and collaboration.AASL, in 1994 sponsored a 5 day institute. Titled Meeting in the Middle, the institute was intended to foster collaboration among librarians, administrators, and teachers.These definitions were determined at the institute. They all begin with the letter C, however, the difference between these Cs is the difference between the library almost in isolation to the program we seek today. Eight years ago. What was the status of collaboration in your school in 1994? Has collaboration increased? Part of the outcome from the institute was to define Collaboration, and identify the difference between cooperation, coordination and collaboration.AASL, in 1994 sponsored a 5 day institute. Titled Meeting in the Middle, the institute was intended to foster collaboration among librarians, administrators, and teachers.These definitions were determined at the institute. They all begin with the letter C, however, the difference between these Cs is the difference between the library almost in isolation to the program we seek today. Eight years ago. What was the status of collaboration in your school in 1994? Has collaboration increased? Part of the outcome from the institute was to define Collaboration, and identify the difference between cooperation, coordination and collaboration.To summarize, collaboration is a working relationship over a relatively long period of time. Collaboration requires shared goals, derived during the partnership. Roles are carefully defined, and more comprehensive planning is required. Communication is conducted at many levels to ensure success. Leadership, resources, risk, control and results are shared. As a result of collaboration there is a substantial benefit. Look at the new accreditation standards for school librarians. The word collaboration and leadership is used consistently throughout these standards. As we revise school library standards, those words will be found in the new standards. Principals and teachers may not have had formal education about libraries but they probably had experience with them as a child or they may have worked with a library as a teacher or administrator. Probe their memories using open-ended questions to allow comfortable responses. This will help o pen a dialogue which can deepen and broaden over time as you share a mutual concern for education. Let the principal know that you are familiar with many approaches to learning, I.e. small group research, literature-based learning centers, games to reinforce skills, case studies,, dramatizations, and so on. Being enthusiastic about the school's curriculum, offering to participate in curriculum planning, with the implications of cooperation and collaboration with the faculty will focus a positive on you and your leadership. If the principal is less than excited about entering this discourse, get him/her to talk about his/her own experiences with successful school library programs.There are success stories In many of the information science textbooks you have. Use those to your advantage if you need to. It is not threatening to talk about faraway places. It really is amazing that school libraries have developed from repositories of books and materials to full blown programs that focus on the process of learning. Adding instruction for use of the library, cooperative teaching to gain access to the best resources for units of study, access through technology to infinite resources and leadership in integration of curriculum make the books and materials come alive and flow into a seamless process of accessibility for students, faculty and staff, and administrator.Teachers on your staff may not know of your educational background. Of course, well-placed degrees and credentials can be subtle signals of your professionalism and preparation for the work you do. You are an equal partner in schooling. Actions always speak louder than words! What you do in the library and in other situations with teachers are more important than anything else you do.Teachers on your staff may not know of your educational background. Of course, well-placed degrees and credentials can be subtle signals of your professionalism and preparation for the work you do. You are an equal partner in schooling. Actions always speak louder than words! What you do in the library and in other situations with teachers are more important than anything else you do.Know the VIPs in your school., what they value and how to help with their causes. Always, know your enemy. Listen to them for understanding, wear their shoes and know why they operate the way the do! Practice one of the 7 habits of highly effective people: win/win. Everybody has a stake in the ultimate goal; reach solutions to problems in such as way that everybody wins.Know the VIPs in your school., what they value and how to help with their causes. Always, know your enemy. Listen to them for understanding, wear their shoes and know why they operate the way the do! Practice one of the 7 habits of highly effective people: win/win. Everybody has a stake in the ultimate goal; reach solutions to problems in such as way that everybody wins.In the previous slide we looked at the critical attributes of Loertschers taxonomy. In the heart or middle of those 10 taxonomies is our bottom line We are collaborating with teachers and students to see that their reading literacy is exemplary. All kinds of reading, but most of all to demonstrate that history can be reflected in historical fiction, that science can be expanded by reading biographies of scientists, and that the love of reading helps develop vocabulary. We strive to have students and teachers who are both information and technological literate. Technology and information literacy are woven throughout TEKS. Collection development forms the base of this equation. The librarian knows the TEKS. The librarian knows students reading interests.

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