Conducting Collaborative Conducting Collaborative SWPBS Tier 1 Team Meetings Presented by:

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  • Slide 1
  • Conducting Collaborative Conducting Collaborative SWPBS Tier 1 Team Meetings Presented by:
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  • www.edprodevelopment.com Providing staff development and technical assistance to schools with 25 years of experience to Tennessee schools.
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  • Name Tag/Tent Please ensure that cell phones do not ring Restrooms
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  • 9:30-9:45 11:30-1:00 3:00
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  • Take 5 minutes to create a t-shirt on a large post-it describing Who you are, your school, number of students, number of teachers. 2. Your schools progress toward implementing SWPBS 3.Your SWPBS teams progress in conducting routine, effective SWPBS team meetings You will have 2 minutes to introduce yourself and your school using your t-shirt
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  • After this workshop, participants: Will know the practices associated with effective collaborative teaming and how these practices translate into collaborative SWPBS team meeting behaviors. Have tools to support SWPBS teams in conducting effective and efficient team meetings.
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
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  • One of the most pressing questions a school must consider as it attempts to build the collaborative culture of a PLC is not, Do we collaborate? But What do we collaborate about?. Dufour, Dufour, & Eaker, 2008, p. 28 It is not enough to do your best: You must know what to do first, then do your best. Demming, 2000 in Dufour, Dufour, & Eaker, 2008, p. 183
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  • 3 minutes
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  • An integrated systems approach for establishing the social culture and individualized behavioral supports needed for schools to achieve both social and academic success for all students while preventing problem behavior
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  • SYSTEMS PRACTICES DATA Supporting Staff Behavior Supporting Decision Making Supporting Student Behavior Integrated Systems: Critical Elements for Durable Results
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  • School-wide Positive Behavior Support: A New Paradigm of School Discipline WPrevention and Teaching Vs. Control Disruption and/or Exclude Troubling Students
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  • All Students All Settings All Times School environment is predictable 1. common language 2. common vision (understanding of expectations) 3. common experience (everyone knows) School environment is positive regular recognition for positive behavior School environment is safe violent and disruptive behavior is not tolerated School environment is consistent adults use similar expectations.
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  • Tier 2: Secondary Interventions Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior 5-15% 2-5 ODRs Tier 1: Primary Preventions: Whole School Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings SYSTEMS OF INTEGRATED SCHOOL-WIDE SUPPORT: The Three Tiered Response to Intervention Model ~ 80% of Students 0-1 ODRs Tier 3: Tertiary Interventions Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior ~5% 6+ ODRs 15
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  • Tier 1: Primary Prevention: Whole School, Classroom, and Non-Classroom Systems for All Students & Staff Tier 2: Secondary Interventions Specialized Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior Tier 3: Tertiary Interventions Specialized Individualized Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior Maximizing Resources Begin Here 16
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  • SWPBS: Team-led Process Administrator(s) Specialized Support Student Community Non-Teaching ( Educational Assistants, Clerical, Janitorial) Teaching Family Representation Start with Team that Works.
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  • Conduct team meetings Coordinate assessments and evaluations Coordinate timeline of actions to be completed Identify and schedule staff development as/when needed Coordinate data entry and routine review of data Coordinate/orchestrate sharing SWPBS data with faculty and staff Coordinate school-wide reward system Obtain expertise in targeted areas Share data/Act as liaison to district and outside consultants Coordinate Marketing and Visibility plan development, implementation, & evaluation Functions/Responsibilities of SWPBS Leadership Team Members
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  • SWPBS Leadership Team SWPBS Leadership Team Do you have the following regularly attending your team meetings? Principal who can make decisions General Education Teacher(s) Special Education Teacher(s) Special Area/Related Arts Teacher(s) Educational Assistant(s) Student(s) Parent(s) School Counselor Non-classroom monitors/ Support Staff (Cafeteria,) Community Members Central Office/BoE Member Community Member
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. In your teams, identify if you have a representative team. Which members do you lack? Record how you will recruit each identified member currently missing on your team.
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  • Have an in-depth level of knowledge about SWPBS Understand how SWPBS fits into school climate Ensure SWPBS evolving and conducted as scheduled Can answer staff questions about SWPBS Are members NOT in an administrative position Act as a cheerleader
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  • Act as a liaison between the team and coach/consultant Teach other team members how to create the agenda Update members after a missed meeting Act as a cheerleader Encourages others to have meeting materials ready SWIS graphs Agenda Timer Role cards Are members NOT in an administrative position
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  • Serves as liaison between district coach/external consultant and school to facilitate conduction of SET Serves as coordinator for team to ensure School Safety Survey data are collected in a timely fashion. Serves as coordinator for team to ensure Self Assessment Survey data are collected in a timely fashion. Spot checks SWIS data entry people to ensure all three are entering data and data are entered in a timely fashion.
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  • Facilitates team review of SET report and generation of prioritized actions. Facilitates team review of School Safety Survey outcomes and generation of prioritized actions using School Safety Data Review Manual (http://www.edprodevelopment.co m/coaches/coaches.htm)http://www.edprodevelopment.co m/coaches/coaches.htm Facilitates team review of Self Asssessment outcomes and generation of prioritized actions. (http://www.edprodevelopment.co m/coaches/coaches.htm )http://www.edprodevelopment.co m/coaches/coaches.htm Serves as internal TIPS experts in reviewing SWIS data before team meetings and presenting precision statements and drafted solutions for solution chart for team to review during meetings. Are fluent with manipulating SWIS reports/graphs through read-only access and can manipulate SWIS during team meetings for teams to refine and prioritize solutions. (May be combined with Data Collector)
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. In your teams, identify who is, or whom the team considers most appropriate to serve the functions of, Meeting Facilitator(s), Data Collector(s), and Data Analyst(s). Record any action required to ensure you have members fulfilling these functions.
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  • SWPBS Leadership Team SWPBS leadership team MUST meet on a regular basis initially twice each month moving to monthly. It is essential to establish the SYSTEM for ensuring the team meetings occur on a routine basis. Requires administrative support
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Do you have your team meetings scheduled for the school year, or at least first semester? If yes, are these on a master calendar? If no, determine when you will meet. Record any follow-up actions required?
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  • The team runs efficient collaborative meetings. Essentially, the leadership team evolves into a PLC. SWPBS Leadership Team
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  • Use of an Agenda Stand if you ..
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  • Phase I Agenda
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  • Use of an Agenda Collaborative (PLC) Behaviors
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  • PIGS Face P Positive Interdependence I Individual Accountability G Group Processing S Social Skills Frequent Face - Frequent Face -to-Face interaction (Thousand, 1994) Elements of successful or effective collaborative teams include:
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  • Teams share a belief system that each team member has a unique and NEEDED expertise. Teams experience a mutual we are in this together feeling.
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  • Teams share a belief system that each team member has a unique and NEEDED expertise. Teams experience a mutual we are in this together feeling. Teams share a common mission and vision of their team which aligns with the schools mission and vision.
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  • John Younker, Tapping the Network Journal, 1991; Dufour, Dufour and Eaker, 2008. Mission A statement that describes the nature and scope of the work to be done. The mission describes why an organization exists.
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  • The mission of Putnam County Schools is to produce individuals who serve and participate productively in society
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  • In your teams, generate your team mission why do you exist. Make sure it aligns to the mission of Putnam County Schools. Share
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  • Vision A statement that describes the ideal state - creating a picture in your mind. What would your ideal student/class/school/team look like? John Younker, Tapping the Network Journal, 1991
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  • The vision of Putnam County School System is that Education is the number one priority for our children.
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  • In your teams, generate your team vision statement if you achieve your mission, what will it look like at your school? Share
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  • Teams share a belief system that each team member has a unique and NEEDED expertise. Teams experience a mutual we are in this together feeling. Teams share a common mission and vision of their team which aligns with the schools mission and vision. Teams coordinate their efforts to achieve at least one commonly agreed-on goal collective commitments and common goals.
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  • In your team, identify your teams goals (i.e., collective commitments) for this year. These goals should identify specifically what needs to be accomplished by the team by the end of this school year. Share
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  • Administrators: This requires tight leadership and vigilance to ensure all policies, practices, and procedures align to the teams mission, vision, and goals.
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  • Teams share a belief system that each team member has a unique and NEEDED expertise. Teams experience a mutual we are in this together feeling. Teams share a common mission and vision of their team which aligns with the schools mission and vision. Teams coordinate their efforts to achieve at least one commonly agreed-on goal. Teams employ distributed leadership functions.
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  • Distributed Functions of Leadership Leadership is a behavior - any action that helps a group achieve its goal(s) and maintain cooperative relationships among members. Leadership requires constant vigilance to balancing task completion and communication.
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  • Commonly Used Roles Time Keeper Facilitator Keeper of the Rudder Scribe or Recorder Jargon buster Norm Prompter Equalizer Task Master EncouragerCommunicator
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  • Role 11/21/0312/01/0312/08/0312/15/031/04/041/11/041/18/04 Facilitator JenniferDebbieStephanieJessicaDeniseMelissaKristi Jargon Buster FrankNedJenniferDebbieStephanieJessicaDenise Equalizer JayneDeniseFrankNedJessicaDebbieStephanie Task Master PatSheriJayneDeniseFrankNedJessica Rudder KristiJessicaPatSheriJayneDeniseFrank Scribe DeniseMelissaKristiJessicaPatSheriJayne Time Keeper StephanieJessicaDeniseMelissaKristiJessicaPat Example of Role Schedule
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  • The principals and the meeting facilitators role: Teach your team these distributed leadership functions. As with all good teaching, this requires modeling and descriptive feedback.
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Reflect on these roles. Discuss amongst yourselves your teams current use of these roles which ones do they use? Not use? Discuss what you need to do to ensure your team uses these roles on a routine basis. Record any actions from your discussion.
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  • Teams share a belief system that each team member has a unique and NEEDED expertise. Teams experience a mutual we are in this together feeling. Teams share a common mission and vision of their team which aligns with the schools mission and vision. Teams coordinate their efforts to achieve at least one commonly agreed-on goal. Teams employ distributed leadership functions. Teams demonstrate parity and respect amongst each other.
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  • Teams have methods for holding one another accountable for agreed-on commitments & responsibilities, such as task follow-through,
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  • Teams have methods for holding one another accountable for agreed-on commitments & responsibilities, such as task follow through, distributed leadership roles
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  • www.edprodevelopment.com 57
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  • Teams have methods for holding one another accountable for agreed-on commitments & responsibilities, such as task follow through, distributed leadership roles and commitment to mission and goals.
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  • Teams establish norms and ground rules for team meetings
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  • Common Responsibilities: Ground Rules & Norms Why Have Them? Team norms or ground rules help to: 1.Create common expectations and understanding among team members. 2.Encourage productive team behavior. 3.Enhance self-management of the team. 4.Provide a written record of behavior guidelines and expectations. Facilitate new team members learning the expectations. 5. Identify predictable problems including the following: a. Important people not included b. Undisciplined behavior at team meetings c. Long, drawn-out discussions d. Complaining e. Dominating team members
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  • Consider. Allow at least 45 Minutes!!!
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  • Initial Agenda
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  • In your teams, review your ground rules already developed. Do you adhere to these? Are these on your agenda? Generate additional ground rules based on the following slide.
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  • Consider. Share
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  • Teams establish norms and ground rules for team meetings Teams set goals for improving relationships and/or more effectively accomplishing tasks. Teams discuss and understand each others teaching, supervisory, and discipline styles. Teams have methods for regularly assessing, processing & discussing their functioning and interpersonal skills
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  • Team Observation Checklist
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  • (1)Meetings will start promptly at 9:30 and end at 11:30 unless otherwise negotiated. (2)SWPBS Team will meet 1x/month. (3)Meeting minutes will be located in a notebook outside Pams office, accessible to team members. (4)Meeting minutes will be taken in scribes preferred method. (5)Scribe will email meeting minutes to those who have email addresses and mailed to those folks who do not have email addresses. (6)Meetings will be held as long as 5/8 members are present. (7)Meetings will be cancelled if we do not have a quorum or if school is cancelled. (8)Major decisions will be made by consensus fist to five. (9)Team members will email or call Pam if going to be late or cannot attend. Pam will share with Barbara P. if she is unable to attend. (10)Task master will either type and disseminate via email or hand write, copy and disseminate at the end of each meeting/put in team members mailboxes.
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Decide who will import your teams ground rules into the agenda and record this as a task to be accomplished by your first meeting.
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  • Teams regularly focus on the development of small-group interpersonal skills that create safe environments to communicate. These include: - active listening - affording team members respect - effective brainstorming
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  • Line up according to your month and date of your birthday! Form teams of 6.
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  • Record brainstormed ideas publicly. Elicit ideas only. No criticism or questions. Push for between 8-18 ideas. Go for the Gusto!
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  • Line up! In your group, brainstorm additional ways you can meaningfully acknowledge students for rule following behavior.
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  • Teams regularly focus on the development of small-group interpersonal skills that create safe environments to communicate. These include: - active listening - affording team members respect - effective brainstorming - efficient decision making strategies
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  • Decide and Announce (e.g., facilitator decides and announces time limit to agenda item) Sample, Decide and Announce (e.g., facilitator asks three team members how much time needed for agenda item, then decides and announces time limit) Majority Vote (e.g., facilitator asks all team members how much time needed for agenda item, then uses majority to set time limit)
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  • In your team, you have your choice of three different rewards for attending this workshop. Using Majority Vote, what is your teams decision? $100 One hour and paid lunch at a place of your choosing Get out of bus duty for a week. Discuss the pros and cons of Majority Vote.
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  • Decide and Announce Sample, Decide and Announce Majority Vote Consensus (e.g., facilitator asks all team members if they agree to the school reward ticket being called the Pirate Treasure and uses team consensus to determine if this is a go.)
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  • 5 4 3 2 1 0 I am all for this idea. I can be a leader. Im for the idea. I can provide support. Im not sure but Im willing to accept the groups opinion. Im not sure. I need more discussion. I cant support it at this time. I need more information. No. I need an alternative I can support. CONSENSUS
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  • Back to the same activity: You have your choice of three different rewards for attending this workshop. One of your team members posed the $100 option. Using the fist to 5, determine if your team has consensus on this choice. If you do not, engage in further discussion until you have achieved consensus. Reflect on pros and cons of decision making via consensus.
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  • Strategies for Narrowing Down Options For Decision Making Dot/Check-mark Method Delphi Weighting
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  • Strategies for Narrowing Down Options For Decision-Making Dot/Check-mark Method
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  • EXAMPLE A group had to decide upon one sporting event they all would go and see. They first brainstormed a list of options.
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  • ______ Option1 football ______ Option 2 mens basketball ______ Option 3 tennis ______ Option 4 Lady Vols basketball ______ Option 5 soccer ______ Option 6 beach volleyball
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  • EXAMPLE A group had to decide upon one sporting event they all would go and see. They first brainstormed a list of options. They next put dots next to their top 2 choices (dependent on number of options available.)
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  • ______ Option1 footbal l ______ Option 2 mens basketball ______ Option 3 tennis ______ Option 4 Lady Vols basketball ______ Option 5 soccer ______ Option 6 beach volleyball Majority rules? Do we have consensus?
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  • Strategies for Narrowing Down Options for Decision-Making Dot/Check-mark Method Delphi Weighting
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  • First: Assign each potential solution a letter of the alphabet. For example, one team generated four solutions. They assigned each solution a letter of the alphabet as follows: A. Increase staff supervision A. Increase staff supervision B. Re-teach school rules in hallway B. Re-teach school rules in hallway C. Get students to create rules posters C. Get students to create rules posters D. Create directional signs for traffic flow D. Create directional signs for traffic flow
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  • The solution believed to be MOST important is assigned the greatest number. The solution believed to be NEXT MOST important is assigned the value of the total number of identified behavior problems minus 1. The behavior believed to be the third most important to address (if there are five or more) is assigned the value of the total number of identified behavior problems minus 2. ETC. The solution believed NEXT LEAST important to address The solution believed NEXT LEAST important to address is assigned the value of 2. The solution believed LEAST important is assigned the value of 1. Second, Each team member assigns a priority value to each solution, rank ordering the solutions from most to least important. The rank ordering, HOWEVER, occurs in a specific manner and is described as follows: FirstThird FifthFourthSecond
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  • Third, EACH teachers value is added to obtain a total sum value for each solution identified, thereby creating a rank order prioritization list. For example in the example provided: BehaviorTeacher 1 Assigned value Teacher 2 assigned value Teacher 3 assigned value Teacher 4 assigned value Total assigned value A. Increase supervision 2443 13 B. Re-teach 4232 11 C. Student Posters 3324 12 D. Signs 1111 4
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  • Thus, the teachers rank ordered the solutions as follows: Most important: increase supervision (13) Next most important: students create rules posters (12) Next most important: re-teach (11) Least important: directional signs (4) Fourth, make a final decision using either majority or consensus decision making.
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  • 1.In your teams choose a recorder for this activity. Recorder, you will need to record in such a manner that your table group can see what you are recording.
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  • 2. The Problem: Your district has given you all the money you need to go to lunch together. You will need to be back here in 2 hours. 3. As a table group, brainstorm for 2 minutes, all your options. Publically record these on the team brainstorming handout.
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  • 4.Use the dot/check method to narrow down your choice. 5.Next, use the delphi weighting procedure to narrow now your choice. Share Pros and Cons
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  • Teams regularly focus on the development of small-group interpersonal skills that create safe environments to communicate. These include: - active listening - affording team members respect, - efficient decision making strategies - effective problem solving
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  • The Focusing Four Brainstorm Record brainstormed ideas on chart paper. Elicit ideas only. No criticism or questions. Push for between 8-18 ideas.Clarify Ask author for clarification if/where needed. Stop clarification when questioner indicates understanding. Condense and separate ideas per request. Team members need to defend request/need.
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  • The Focusing Four (Cont) Advocate Team members may advocate for as many items and as many times as they wish. Advocacy must be brief and phrased in the positive.Canvass Ask team members to identify which 3 ideas they feel are most important. They do not need to be placed in rank order. Take a hand count to determine which items are of most importance to the group (majority vote).
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  • 1.At your tables, number off 1 -4. 2.Numbers 1,2,3,4 sit together. 3.You have the following problem to solve: You and your teammates are on a boat, and it is sinking. You must decide what 3 items you are going to take off the boat with you using the Focusing Four strategy. You must all come to consensus about the three choices. 4. Return to your home base and share your experiences with your assigned problem solving process. What was good about it? What was hard? Whatd you like? Dislike?
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  • STEP 1: Define the problem Group Problem-Solving Process STEP 2: Diagnose the problem STEP 3: Brainstorm solutions for the problem STEP 4: Evaluate pros and cons of each solution STEP 5: Choose and implement a solution STEP 6: Evaluate the success of the solution and revise as needed
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  • On the next slide and in your handouts are SWIS graphs. Using the Group Problem Solving Process go through steps 1-5 to choose at least one action to implement based on the graphs. Be prepared to share your steps.
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  • Referrals By Problem BehaviorReferrals By Time Referrals By LocationReferrals By Student
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  • 5Management supports the process 5They have been trained in the process 5All members have committed to the process 5They have established goals and expectations 5They adhere to team norms of behavior Teams Succeed When
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Reflect on practices to support effective brainstorming, decision-making, and problem solving practices. Discuss amongst yourselves your and your teams current use of these which ones do they use? Not use? Discuss what you need to do to teach and support each other to use these practices on a routine basis. Which ones will you address first? Second? Record your actions Share
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  • Teams engage in frequent face to face interactions SWPBS leadership team MUST meet on a regular basis initially twice each month moving to monthly. It is essential to establish the SYSTEM for ensuring the team meetings occur on a routine basis. Requires administrative support
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  • Physical Environment Sit in a circle Comfort FACE-TO-FACE INTERACTION
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  • Finding Time To Plan Purchased Time (Hire subs, compensate for spending holidays or vacations planning.) Rescheduled Time (Revise calendar year and/or daily timetable) Freed-Up Time (Community volunteers to conduct day program or to free up teacher for planning/; Specials scheduled during same time block; Student Interns) Borrowed Time I O U (Add 15 minutes for 4 days, gain 1 hour on 5th day.) Released Time (Inservice, institute, and professional development days; scheduled planning per mo.) From: The Learner-Centered School, p. 51-52. (Extrapolated from Time for Reform)
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  • Finding Time To Plan New Time (Teacher incentives to motivate use of own time) Better-Used Time (Rethink faculty & department meetings already on schedule use memo, notes, or bulletins when possible) Found Time (Serendipitous times that occasionally occur; student teacher, visitor, assembly, snow day) Common Time (Scheduled block time for teacher teams) Tiered Time (Layer with existing functions such as lunch and breakfast meetings) From: The Learner-Centered School, p. 51-52. (Extrapolated from Time for Reform)
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  • Finding Time To Plan In your teams take the next 3 minutes to brainstorm (Remember no critiquing during brainstorming) where you could find the time/more time for your team to plan together. Be creative.
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  • ActionBy When 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Do you have your team meetings scheduled for the school year, or at least first semester? If yes, are these on a master calendar? If no, determine when you will meet. Record any follow-up actions required?
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  • Stages of Team Development Forming Functioning Formulating Fermenting
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  • Establish a plan with designated assignments
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  • www.edprodevelopment.com
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  • Evaluation 1. P o s t t e s t 2. E d P r o D e v el o p m e n t E v al u a ti o n 3. T A S L E v al u a ti o n ( T A S L s e e k e r s )
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