Fall 2014, Issue 7

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East Los Angeles College Campus News, Monterey Park, California

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  • Wednesday, OctOber 29, 2014VOlume 72, Issue 7 sIngle cOpy free - addItIOnal cOpIes 50 centswww.elaccampusnews.com

    Stop.

    Community college network names ELAC leading institution

    East Los Angeles College is one of three new California community colleges recognized by Achieving the Dream (ATD) as a leading institution for 2014.

    ATD i s a ne twork a imed to increase community college student success. Sixteen community colleges were added to the network this year.

    The network consists of more than 200 participating colleges across the country sharing a commitment to use data and past program outcomes to determine which activities, services and courses are the most helpful

    toward student success.The programs which served 150

    students in 2009, has more than 600 students this year.

    These colleges have shown how data can inform policy and practice to help community college students achieve their goals, resulting in improved skills, better employability and economic growth for families, communities and the nation as a whole, reports the ATD website.

    ELACs first-year experience programs integrate counseling, s t u d e n t s u c c e s s c o u r s e s , supplemental instruction and access to highly impacted courses.

    The faculty has specifically focused on addressing the needs

    of new students in the subjects of mathematics and English.

    ELAC joined the network in 2011 and has since created programs that have furthered student learning outcomes. The developmental English success rates for first time college students increased f r o m a b o u t 2 2 percent in 2007 to 31 percent in 2010.

    Our entry into the ATD network c o i n c i d e d w i t h the development of our colleges Educational Master Plan, Dean o f Academic Affa i r s Caro l

    Kozeracki said. Kozeracki said the network

    explicitly influenced the process the school followed to es tab l i sh the o b j e c t i v e s a n d action items in the institutions six-year plan.

    ELAC has seen i m p r o v e m e n t i n s t u d e n t s through increased p e r s i s t e n c e , i m p r o v e d m a t h results and higher a s s e s s m e n t t e s t

    scores after part icipation in workshops.

    School representatives have been

    attending ATD national conferences over the past three years.

    The main purpose of the conference is to share ideas with other colleges about new programs that help students achieve their academic goals.

    The implementation of one new program involved full-time and part-time English faculty working together to integrate technology into a developmental English course.

    The course was for people did not pass the assessment test, and consisted of online assignments, chat rooms and high interaction among faculty and students. Thirty percent of the students who passed the class retook the assessment test and were able to skip to a higher

    BY jane fernandez and jade inglada

    Staff Writer

    level English course.East Los Angeles College has

    put in place programs that are not only successful, but that also propel our overall college outcomes forward, stated ELAC President Marvin Martinez. We are proud of our efforts to date, but will not rest on them. The college is dedicated to continued efforts to improve the outcomes for all students.

    By keeping track of student outcomes, the college has added and modified projects that have been successful for students.

    Kozeracki is excited about discovering additional approaches other leading colleges have found effective and hopes to expand the scope of the existing projects.

    Halloween Parade The Child Development Center is holding

    its Annual Halloween Parade this tomorrow between the auditorium and library. The morning group will be at 10 a.m. and the afternoon group will be at 2 p.m.

    news Briefs

    Save the Bats Week This week is National Save the Bats

    Week. Find out why its important to save bats and how to help at savebats.org.

    Keep track of Campus News For the latest news coming out of ELAC,

    Like facebook.com/CampusNews, follow on Twitter and Instagram @Elaccampusnews. For more stories go to Elaccampusnews.com.

    We are proud of our efforts to date, but will not rest on them.

    Marvin MartinezELAC President

    Elans walk to remember domestic violence victim

    About 100 people gathered in memory of Jamay Michelle Sticca at the football stadium on Saturday. Sticca was a victim of domestic violence and was murdered in 2008.

    East Side Spirit and Pride (ESSP) Club adviser and uncle of Sticca Dennis Sanchez was the first of several speakers to stand in front of the crowd.

    Sanchez thanked everyone present and introduced Sticcas parents, Ron Sanchez and Jackie Joo, who traveled from Sacramento to attend. A sign expressing peoples condolences was presented to Sticcas parents.

    The Rev. Mark Torres from Homeboy Industries also took to the podium. Thank you for taking seriously something that needs to be taken seriously, said Torres.

    Torres cited Buddhist teachings and said that acknowledging suffering is the first step in overcoming

    it. He then led everyone in a moment of prayer. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV), one in every

    four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime.

    Among the speakers was Athletic Director Al Cone, who emphasized the need for males to be a part of the solution. The NCADV states, boys who witness domestic violence are twice as likely to abuse their own partner and children when they become adults.

    Psychology Professor Jody Adewale, Psy.D., explained a big part of the problem is the state of mind of young

    people. I was talking to a group of students about the Ray Rice

    incident. I asked them what they thought about what Rice did and was surprised when some of them asked what his wife did, as if hitting her could be justified somehow, said Adewale. Domestic violence is never justified.

    Sticcas mother was the next to speak. Joo encouraged those present to never give up on their goals. Sticca was a dedicated nursing student and worked full-time, Joo said.

    BY ivan cazaresStaff Writer

    After Joo spoke, two domestic violence victims shared their stories. One of them was a young woman whos the same age Sticca would have been. An estimated 1.3 million women experience domestic violence in the United States every year.

    Joo and step brother Damian Sanchez described her as being a feisty girl. She would have been the loudest one in the crowd, they both said.

    I looked up to my sister. She always looked out for me, she wouldnt even let boys talk to me, Teylor Sanchez, her younger sister, said. In memory of her older sister, Teylor got a lion tattoo, which incorporates Sticcas favorite color, her initials and hair which Teylor compared to a lions mane.

    Adewale said getting out of an abusive relationship is difficult because it becomes a cycle consisting of three stages.

    I t s t a r t s w i th t he honeymoon stage; then the stepping on eggshells stage, which is when the victim is fearful of their partners reactions; and finally the explosion stage.This is when the perpetrator physically abuses their partner. It then starts all over again, Adewale said.

    Participants walked around the perimeter of stadium and twice around the track. The crowd was lively and interacted with each other and Sticcas family.

    Adewale ended the meeting by asking everyone to stand up and make some noise, instead of the traditional moment of silence.

    It starts with the honeymoon stage; then the s t e p p i n g o n e g g s h e l l s stage, which is when the victim is fearful of their partners reactions; a n d f i n a l l y t h e

    explosion stage. This is when the perpetrator physically abuses their partner. It then starts all over again.

    - Jody Adewale, Psy.D.

  • www.ELACCampusNews.com

    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014Opinion2 EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE CAMPUS NEWS

    Campus News encourages letters to the editor relating to campus issues. Letters must be typed and double spaced. Submitted material becomes the proper ty of Campus News and cannot be returned. Letters should be limited to 250 words or less. Campus News reserves the right to edit letters for grammatical errors or libelous content.

    Anonymous le t te rs w i l l not be pr inted. Writers must s ign submissions and print their names and a phone number where they can be reached. Letters should be addressed to the editor of Campus News. Submissions can be made at the mailroom in building E1 or the Journalism department office in the Technology Center in E7-303.

    East Los Angeles College Campus News

    1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez E7-303

    Monterey Park, CA 91754(323) 265-8819,

    Ads (323) 265-8821 Fax (323) 415-4910

    The East Los Angeles College

    Campus News is published as a learning experience, of fered under the East Los Angeles College Journalism program. The editorial and advertising materials are free from prior restraint by vir tue of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

    The opinions expressed are exclusively those of the writer. Accordingly, materials published herein, including any opinions expressed, should not be interpreted as the position of the Los Angeles Community College District, East Los Angeles College, or any officer or employee thereof.

    PRINTING BY NEWS PUBLISHERS PRESS

    EDITOR IN CHIEFJesus Figueroa

    MANAGING EDITORDanny Vasquez

    ART DIRECTORLindsey Maeda

    FRONT EDITORJade Inglada

    OPINION EDITORMarcus Camacho

    NEWS EDITORMegan G. Razzetti

    FEATURE EDITORCortez Cruz Serrato

    ARTS EDITORLiliana Marquez

    SPORTS EDITORAndrew Ruiz

    PHOTO EDITORJulianne Obregon

    COPY EDITORRussell J. Zazueta

    CARTOONISTKien Ha

    ONLINE EDITORSSergio Berrueta Liliana MarquezJane Fernandez

    Tadzio Garcia

    SOCIAL MEDIACynthia Laguna

    Julianne Obregon

    STAFF WRITERSCarlos AlvarezAyana ArroyoDulce CarrilloIvan Cazares

    Arthur CervantesDamien GuzmanMaria C. IsidoroJoseph Ovalle

    PHOTOGRAPHERTadzio Garcia

    ADVERTISINGStefanie Arocha

    DISTRIBUTIONJesus Figueroa

    ADVISERSJean Stapleton

    Sylvia Rico-Sanchez

    Counselors ignore students goalsThe counselors at East Los

    Angeles College concentrate on getting students out of community college, but they fail to serve students needs toward finding a major or concentrating on a major.

    Many students come to community college undecided or unsure about their major.

    As part of the registration process, incoming students are asked to visit with a counselor and develop an educational plan as well as take assessment tests for English and math.

    From the 2007-08 to the 2012-13 the overall average of transfer or completion rate is 41.7 percent based on http://scorecard.cccco.edu/, which scores each college as part of Californias student success initiative.

    The score is based on students who entered college testing at a college level math and English, 69.9 percent, and students who didnt, 37.8 percent.

    The student success initiative, which recommends 22 policy changes, was designed to increase the amount of students who graduate, obtain a certificate or complete a degree.

    The educational plan counselors suggest for incoming students usually consists of only general education classes that will help a student graduate.

    An education plan like that will probably not help the student figure out their major, their area of interest or further their knowledge on a topic they already have chosen to focus on.

    The purpose of visiting a counselor should be focused on benefiting each students needs and less on obtaining a better transfer/graduation rate for the school.

    A counselor should talk with each student and try to accommodate each individual students likes with an efficient and effective educational plan.

    As a journalism major, when

    visiting with a counselor, I was complimented on knowing my current events and speaking well, but my educational plan included no journalism classes.

    The counselor did not realize how important it would be for a journalism major who will apply for a job in the journalism field to have the title of editor in chief on a rsum.

    Californias student success initiative hopes that with the 22 policy recommendations it will

    strengthen programs that work and the programs that dont can be restructured to work.

    Many majors include classes which consume a large amount of time and make it difficult to take several classes in the same semester.

    A better understanding of a students goals and needs can help a counselor better advise a student on their educational plan and on the courses that can be taken concurrently during the

    same semester.A few extra minutes talking with

    each student, details the courses and programs offered at ELAC and some consideration of a students career and educational goals may help make the college experience more enjoyable and productive for students.

    With an education plan that provides each student with a structured and focused path, students can have a more enjoyable and successful college experience.

    Although we hear about it, every time we turn on the television, students shouldnt be too worried about catching the Ebola virus.

    While in class, a student near me was continuously coughing. Without really thinking about it, I found myself already deep in thought, about the Ebola virus.

    The following day I talked with my friend about it and discovered that he too found himself thinking about the virus.

    As I waited for class, I overheard a group of students, sitting on a bench, conversing about the same topic.

    With constant updates and daily reminders on social media sites and news channels, its no wonder the people are worrying about the virus.

    We are given new information regarding Ebola every day. There are people on different news channels showcasing the way they are protecting themselves to ensure they dont get infected.

    In states that have been infected with the virus, there was a school shutdown and people were too frightened to buy food from their regular food truck.

    With only three people currently infected with Ebola, within the United States, the worry should be slim. Students should think more about their midterms then getting infected with Ebola.

    After reading into it, I discovered that Ebola shouldnt be feared so much because it is only transferable by coming in to contact with bodily fluids of a person who is already infected.

    Another way of becoming infected are through objects that have been contaminated with the virus. Also, a person infected must already be showing the symptoms to be able to pass the virus on to someone else.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Students fear of Ebola epidemic is pointlessBY aYana arroYo

    Staff Writer

    (CDC) website, this means you cannot get Ebola through air, water or food.

    Plus there have been no reports of someone being infected with Ebola in California, which means that cough your friend had the other day was probably something else.

    Even though the chances of being infected with Ebola are small, students and staff should

    still take precautions to avoid getting themselves and others sick.

    There is a greater chance of getting infected with influenza.

    According to the CDC, it is best to get an annual flu vaccine in October, because it takes about two weeks for the antibodies to take full effect and help the body prevent itself from getting sick.

    Students can visit their doctor or local pharmacies to get their

    annual flu vaccine and avoid getting sick.

    If students find it difficult to get their vaccination outside campus, due to time issues or other reasons, students can get their vaccination on campus.

    The Student Health Center located in G8-111 offers the vaccine, visit the center for more information or call (323) 265-8651

    BY Jesus figueroaStaff WriterC a m p u s

    What has been your experience with the counselors at ELAC?

    Being a part of the EOP&S program, they are very helpful. They really

    try to see what your best interests are and dont discourage you. They

    keep your options open.

    - Yesenia Salazar

    Ive been there once and they didnt help out that much. She just gave me a list of classes to take. They didnt recommend

    any universites.

    - Jose Marin

    Voice

    Fast Facts

    Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Thomas Frieden said Thomas Duncan arrived back from Africa on Sept. 20. Duncan didnt show symptoms until Sept.24 and on Sept.28 was admitted to the hospital

    There has only been four confirmed case of Ebola and five people have been quarantined.

    Worldwide there are between 250,000 and 500,000 people who died from the flu per year. During flu season, between 3 and 5 million people will have, what is considered, a serious case of influenza.

    More poeple die from car crashes than Ebola. The National Highway Traffic Saftey Administration (NHTSA) reported 33,562 people died in traffic crashes in the U.S. and included an estimate of 10,322 of those people died in a drunk driving crash.

    Sources: www.heavy.comwww.coldflu.comwww.responsibility.org

  • EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE CAMPUS NEWSWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 News 3

    www.ELACCampusNews.com

    The Monterey Park Bruggemeyer Library and its partner organization, Asian American Economic Development Enterprises (AAEDE), are

    seeking paid tutors for the 2014-2015 Session of the Reading Rockets literacy program. Reading Rockets is an afterschool literacy program designed for at-risk children in 2nd through 6th grades. Students receive personalized tutoring to develop vital literacy skills and build confident readers. Reading Rockets was recently awarded the Public Library Associations 2013 Innovations in Literacy award which recognizes unique and inventive literacy pro-grams that result in a measurable impact on the li-brarys community. Tutors must be current college students or recent graduates at least 18 years of age and must be avail-able every Monday through Thursday from 3:005:30 p.m. between October 13, 2014 and May 28, 2015. Tutors will receive an hourly rate of $10.00. Applicants should possess a combination of skills and experience suited to successful work with children and families. Flexibility, energy, sense of humor, patience, positive attitude, and the ability to work independently and exercise sound judgment are necessary. Bilingual ability in Mandarin or Cantonese is desirable, though not required. There is no deadline however, space for the position is limited and this opportunity is on-ly available until the position is filled. We are looking to fill this position ASAP. If selected, tutors will also be required to complete the following:

    Fingerprinting and background check Drug test Employment contract

    For more information or if interested in applying for the position, please contact Diana Garcia at (626) 307-1358 or dgarcia@montereypark.ca.gov.

    Reading RocketsReading Rockets Youth Literacy Program at the Monterey Park Bruggemeyer LibraryYouth Literacy Program at the Monterey Park Bruggemeyer LibraryYouth Literacy Program at the Monterey Park Bruggemeyer Library

    Monterey Park Bruggmeyer Library 318 S. Ramona Avenue Monterey Park, CA 91754 626-307-1358 www.montereypark.ca.gov/Library

    Asian American Economic Development

    Enterprises, Inc.

    A taste of Latin culture comes to East Los Angeles College with the annual Dia de Los Muertos Festival on Nov. 3 starting at 10 a.m.

    The Chicano Studies Department will host the event at the S2 Art Complex courtyard.

    The event will include a toy drive where people can donate a new, unwrapped toy to the Wish Upon an Angel Foundation booth.

    The toy drive is for the non-profit organization founded by Chicano Studies Professor Angelita Rovero-Herrera.

    Herrera started the foundation in honor of 5-year-old Mario Molina,

    who died of leukemia, and 15-year-old Kyle Rodas, who died from brain cancer.

    The toy drive is for children diagnosed with cancer and Herrera will donate the gifts in their names to local hospitals.

    T h e even t was popular last year, bringing in nearly 800 people. Herrera said she is hoping to double the amount of people who attended last year.

    The event will feature musical and dance performances from groups such as Grupo Cuauhtli, Conjunto Los Pochos, Domingo

    Dia de Los Muertos festival gives back BY marcus camacho

    Staff Writer

    CTE fair helps direct students futuresBY jade inglada

    Staff Writer

    Technology Program trains students on how to work in the medical field. There are about 250 students currently enrolled in the program.Students are able to learn hospital billing and how to read codes for insurance companies.

    Mechanical Engineering major Tiffany Alvarez was part of the Health Science and Medical Technology booth . Alvarez

    Bands/Entertainment

    A variety of department career information and clubs were available to students during the Career and Technical Education Fair last Wednesday in the S2 and P2 quad.

    The Off ice of Workforce Education and Associated Student Union hosted the CTE Fair.

    The purpose of the fair was to offer information to students on the different path options available at East Los Angeles College.

    This could be achieved by joining a club with students working toward similar goals or following department-based criteria for a certificate, easing the transfer process to a four-year university.

    We have programs designed to help you find your path. By taking few of our assessments, we can find out what career or job is best for you, Career Job Placement employee Randy Lee said.

    Career Job Placement offers help in completing cover letters, resumes and in preparation for a job interview.

    The Architecture Department was one of the 21 booths at the CTE Fair. The department has an average of about 300 students per semester. A large number of students transfer to local universities such as the University of Southern California, Woodbury University and California State Polytechnic, Pomona, every year.

    Architectural majors are also able to receive certificates or an associate degree in architectural drawing and architectural computer aided design. The architecture program offers fifty courses in design, technical documentation, computer-aided design and building code.

    The Health Information and

    explained how a lot of students often dont know the variety of options in the medical technology field to major in.

    Mechanical i s more l ike synthetics, how things work together, while biomechanical is creating the fake arm, leg or body parts, said Alvarez.

    The Automotive Club shared information about the club and

    its current goal to raise funds to participate in the Shell Eco-marathon competition in April 2015. The marathon gives participants a set amount of time and fuel to design, build and test ultra energy efficient vehicles.

    Automotive technology is not just about fixing cars. Its about design and fabrication concepts. The industry is changing, looking

    for more eco-friendly vehicles like hybrids, but with new technology, club member Juan Gonzalez said.

    The students also shared that they offer automobile repairs for a $10 donation that goes to the program. Students are graded on their performance when repairing automobiles. The department only asks for customers to pay for their own car parts.

    Chi ld Development major Cassandra Avila attended the fair to look into the Child, Family and Education studies booth. Child development is something I want to have a career in because I love kids. I love the way they interact with one another, Avila said.

    Avila said she found the fair helpful. She learned about the different careers that are available and what is required for each one.

    The Art Department offered information for some career options such as animation, illustration and character design.

    According to Frame by Frame Animation Club President Erica Mazariegos, many students are interested in pursuing a career in animation. One popular type of character design of interest is in horror.

    I was debating on majoring in Psychology or Criminal Justice. After comparing information from both departments, I think Im going for Psychology,student Jazmin Espinoza said.

    It was a great way of finding out information, especially for people who are new to the school and dont know where to go to ask for help, or even for students who are still trying to figure out what they want to do with their life, student Leslie De La Torre said.

    Career guidance intern Yvette Ivaven said they expected more than 1,000 attendees to check out the fair.

    ELAC Shipping and Recieving staff member Regis Bell performed his single Luv U Down! as RB the Evolution.

    Free lunch was given to the first 500 students with a valid student I.D. There was a raffle to win an iPad and entertainment throughout the fair.

    Cardling Del Real, Gil Milanes, Jessica Munoz, Stephanie Garibay and Jenny Gramillo contributed to this story.

    pathway to the futureStudents were given the opportunity to ask questions and get more information about some of the departments available on campus at the Career and Technical Education Find Your Pathway fair held in the Perfoming and Fine Arts Complex on Oct. 22.

    CN/JuliaNNe obregoN

    Siete, Viento Callejero, Quintol Sol and Circulo Ajolote.

    There will be more than 40 booths including face painters,

    artists, Day of the Dead art, jewelry, handbags and clothing. The festival

    means a great deal to Herrera.

    Although the festival is in its third year, the Annual

    Altar Exhibit at the VPAM is in its 11th year.

    The tradition of the event was passed on to Herrera by retired professor and chair of the Chicana/Chicano Studies Department Sybil Venegas.

    Being that Im part t ime instructor in the Chicano Studies Department, Dia de los Muertos is my absolute favorite holiday, Herrera said, and once I took over the Dia De Los Muertos Altar Exhibit three years ago, I thought big. I thought a festival would coincide just great.

    Her re ra says wi thou t the Associated Student Union (ASU), the event might not have been possible and she appreciates what they did for the event.

    ASU is the sponsor and pays for the entire event. Dean Sonia Lopez and Magaly Rojas have been my saviors. Each year, I am growing this event. Herrera said.

    They are the most supportive and amazing organization I have had the pleasure to work with, she said.

    The altar exhibit will open with a reception on Saturday at 11 a.m. and run through Nov. 19.

    The Chicano Studies 7 and Chicano Studies 54 students have constructed 11 altars for the exhibit which focus on various elements of Chicano Culture and History.

    The altars will pay homage to the indigenous ancestry such as the Virgen de Guadalupe/Tonantzin, farmworkers, Cesar Chavez, casualties of the Zoot Suit Riots and Mexican Singers.

    Other ELAC clubs will be selling food and using this event as a fundraiser to help promote their clubs.

    - Aztec Dancers- Quinto Sol- Folklorico- Domingo Siete- Viento Callejero- Los Pochos

    10-10:45 11:-11:45

    11:45- 12:15pm12:30-1:30 1:45-2:45

    3-4

    Several clubs will be selling food at their booths.

    ESL Club: Boba, Doughnuts, water and sodaFrame by Frame Animation Club: Oreoball, peanut butter bars, pan dulce and art paintsS.A.S.A: Water, chocolate cookies, pizza and sodasESSP: Carne asada nachos, regular nachos, cupcakes, cocadas, aguas Fresca (Jamaica, Pineapple, and horchata) Hot Cheetos and purified water Dream Wavers: Aguas frescas (cucumber, lime and orange lemonade)Veterans Club: TacosAdmin. of Justice: not specifiedChicano Studies Department: not specified

    Club Menus:

  • www.ELACCampusNews.com

    EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE CAMPUS NEWSWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014SportS4

    #elaccn

    Dear Citizens, twenty two years with no change with the same Congressional representative in office who does not fight for us and advocates nothing is enough. it is time to elect a new leader and academic who can work and fight for the better of all citizens and increase social security benefits. i will reduce student tuition fees. i will fight to obtain price controls on food and gasoline and reduce taxes for the benefit of all. More jobs, educational benefits, and the reduction of crime are just a few of my objectives when elected to Congress.DistinguiDos CuiDaDanos, Mi prioridad es dirigir mas fondos hacia programas de trabajo para todos los cuidadanos e incrementar los beneficios del seguro social. reducir los pagos de matricula estudiantil. Luchar para obtener control de precios de comida y gasolina y reducir los impuestos para el beneficio de todos. atentamente, David sanchez, Ph.D.

    40th District incluDes:

    congress has FaileD! FallaDo el congreso!

    on tuesDay, november 4th elect DaviD sanchez

    Democrat For congress

    www.davidsanchezforcongress2014.us

    new LeaDershiP is the onLy answer to Prevent a DeePer reCession.

    40th District incluDes: bell, bellFlower, bell garDens, cuDahy, commerce, Downey, e.l.a., Florence, huntington Park, maywooD, Paramount, south central l.a.

    DAVID sAnchez

    time For change, vote!

    for congress 2014 40th Congressional DistriCt

    David sanchez, Teacher & Academic

    The womens soccer team beat El Camino College 4-1 yesterday avenging their one-sided loss to South Coast Conferences first place team Cerritos College last Friday.

    Huskies Head Coach Tessa Troglia said that getting the win against El Camino after the loss against Cerritos was important and that the team needed to bounce back quickly from the loss.

    ELAC is now 8-4-3 overall, 5-2-2 in conference.

    The Huskies needed a team effort against El Camino to make up for the loss of teams leading scorer Carla Quijada. Quijada missed her second straight game yesterday after injuring her knee in last Tuesdays game against Los Angeles Harbor College.

    Quijada leads the team with 21 goals and she is currently the third leading scorer in the South Coast Conference and according to Troglia.

    Quijadas doctors have not yet cleared her to return to the field.

    Troglia said that she was pleased

    that different contributors were able to step up and that sophomore Cristal Montoya and freshman Arye Loone took on prominent roles.

    Sophomore midfielder Cristal Montoya made up for Quijadas absence, leading the Huskies with two goals.

    Montoyas two goals proved to be the most important of the game. Her first goal tied the game in the tenth minute and her second goal in the last minutes of the first half became the deciding goal of the game.

    Montoya said that scoring both goals felt good, especially her second that was assisted by sophomore forward Maria Beccerra but that getting the victory was more important because the team needed to win in order to remain eligible for postseason play.

    Troglia said that she has been encouraging Montoya to shoot more often and she was hopeful that this game will give her the confidence to contribute more offensively.

    El Caminos Head Coach John Britton was disappointed with his teams weak defensive performance in the second half.

    East LA was a better team but

    all four goals were preventable, and it annoys me that we worked really hard (throughout the game) to give up two goals late in the game that were clearly avoidable, Britton said.

    Goals from freshman forward Araye Loone and sophomore Blakely Ficenec late in the second half put the game out of reach for El Camino.

    The Huskies currently rank fourth in the SCC with six games remaining on their schedule.

    Troglia said that the win against El Camino was a game that the Huskies should have won and every game is a must win.

    According to Troglia, the Huskies have to win the rest of their games in order to make the Southern California Regional playoffs.

    Trigola said that she will have a better idea about the teams playoff hopes after their game on Friday against Long Beach City College.

    She also said that the players on the team are maintaining a high commitment level this late in the season and that the Huskies just have to focus on taking it one game at a time.

    Womens soccer team bounces back against El CaminoBY cortez cruz serrato

    Staff Writer

    Mens soccer sets for third conference tieThe mens soccer team failed

    to score a victory over the No. 12-ranked El Camino College after Warrior Carlos Rosales scored the equalizing-goal to end the match, 1-1, yesterday at Weingart Stadium.

    The 82th minute equalizer by Rosales prevented East Los Angeles College from obtaining its third South Cost Conference victory.

    This was the second consecutive tie for the Huskies. ELAC now stands 5-6-5 overall, 2-4-3 in conference play while El Camino (7-1-7, 5-1-3) got its third consecutive tie in conference play.

    El Camino Assistant Coach Ever Morataya said that the ties against Cerritos and Mt. San Antonio colleges respectively affected the team, but that they are still fighting for conference points.

    We knew it was going to be very physical. Its always hard to come to ELAC and try to get a (good) result because they know how to play. I think they deserved the tie, Morataya said.

    Although Husky Alfredo Leon scored the opening goal for ELAC at about the 30-minute mark and the Huskies held the advantage for majority of the game, Rosales strike just minutes before the end left the Huskies unable to come back.

    Leon opened the score after the Huskies sent the ball to the wing and crossed it.

    Husky Cesar Alvarez had the ball and held possession. Then, he tried to take a shot and score, but the ball was deflected.

    Leon got the ball in the air, volleyed it and drove it into the top corner of the net.

    This was Leons second goal of the season.

    We were all happy because we followed the game plan while playing against t h e n u m b e r o n e t e a m i n conference. It was hard work and we scored to go up, Leon said.

    According to ELAC Assistant Coach Ricardo Raygoza , t he Huskies entered the game with a 4-3-3 formation.

    T h e g a m e plan was to come out victorious with three points. We have been working on that for the past week or two. Three forwards on top gives us a better opportunity to score. It does eliminate a little bit on the midfield, but we get better chances to score, Raygoza said.

    The game plan succeeded with a solid defense and a physical game, ELAC prevented El Camino from scoring throughout the half.

    We made sure that they (ELAC) understood that they had the lead

    and that they worked hard for it, so they needed to work extra hard to not let it go, Raygoza said.

    He also said that they asked the players to be well organized and to make sure they moved the ball around.

    We make sure tha t they understand that they need to defend just as much as they fight for the ball, Raygoza said.

    T h e E L A C de fense kep t preventing El Camino f rom s c o r i n g a n d ELACs goa l s co re r Leon , El Camino got lucky with the equalizer.

    They were c o m i n g t o t h e g a m e a s first (place) in c o n f e r e n c e . We needed the points, but were

    not able to hold them at the end, Leon said.

    We had plenty of chances to score, but couldnt capitalize. The plan was just to hold them and play which we did, but at the end they got lucky and capitalized.

    For ELAC Assistant Coach Melvin Rubio their defense did a great job.

    Paco (Juan Gallegos) particularly showed great leadership in the back. We called Alex (Guerrero) to play

    in the back and he definitely stepped up. Overall the team played well, but the ending was very unfortunate, Rubio said.

    Both teams struggled throughout the match despite having plenty of chances to score.

    The Huskies came close to scoring again during the second half when Alvarez gave a pass to Guerrero who attempted to score, but sent the ball over the crossbar.

    Then came in Rosales to score the equalizer for the Warriors, his first goal of the season.

    As soon as I saw the ball bounce in front of me, I thought, Put it in the back of the net. After I scored I wanted to go for another one to get the win Rosales said.

    Rosales also said that the Huskies closed in the back and that made it complicated for the Warriors to score.

    ELACs Jose Gudino had another clear chance to make the score 2-1 with a powerful shot that hit the cross bar during the last minutes of the match.

    We had a very good game. Everyone went hard, but we just couldnt finish at the end. We were up 1-0 and they (El Camino) just found a way to beat us, they caught us off guard and scored the goal, Leon said.

    The Huskies will face Long Beach City College Friday on the road at 4 p.m. The Vikings (6-4-5, 4-3-2) currently have 14 conference points.

    The Huskies cross country teams shocked a field of four-year colleges and universities with their results at the 7th Annual West Coast Jamboree at Irvine Regional Park in Orange last Saturday.

    The meet consisted of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletic teams from across the country as well as East Los Angeles College, the only community college to participate.

    Sophomore Laura Aceves finished third for the Huskies in the womens 5-Kilometer run leading the womens team to 11th place.

    The Huskies stunned Hope International,Vanguard and William Jessup universities, 12th through 14th finishers, respectively.

    Aceves finished in 17:53.5 minutes edging fourth place finisher Karis Frankian of The Masters University of Santa Clarita by 3.1 seconds.

    As a result, Aceves joined the NAIA West Coast Jamboree Womens All-Time list with the 11th-fastest time.

    I was pleased with my finish. I ran (36) seconds faster than I did here last year by keeping a pace with the top runners, Aceves said.

    The womens team ran to their best results in five years of competing at the Jamboree even without sophomore Guadalupe Yanez, a top runner recovering from injury.

    Freshmen runners Stephanie Trelles, Viridiana Hernandez and Luz Badillo finished in the No. 2-4 spots for the Huskies.

    The freshmen were followed by sophomore Ruby Padilla, freshman

    Maybell Sanchez and sophomore Vanessa Buelna to round out the top seven finishers for the womens team.

    This was Buelnas best finish all season. Vanessa began walking laps with her father at age two, which led running. This was to work with the (breathing) problems she had, Lillian Buelna, Vanessa Buelnas mother said.

    She would do two laps before she could play. This led to a lifetime of running. Im so proud of her. Vanessa Buelna finished in a top-seven spot for ELAC.

    The top seven women advance out of next weeks meet to the SoCal Cross Country finals in two weeks if the Huskies run fast enough to move on to the postseason. With a previous state ranking, the Huskies are expected to advance.

    Both ELAC teams will compete in the SCC finals Friday beginning at 10 a.m. at Hahamonga Watershed Park in Pasadena.

    The mens team will race the entire team for the first time this year at the SCC finals including Andres De La Cruz and Salvador Ascencio, both who are recovering from injuries.

    We work together to win, but it is up to each of us to improve our times to advance to (SoCal), sophomore Omar Alvarenga said.

    Cristian Flores led the mens team finishing as ELACs top runner. The mens team beat San Diego Christian University of Santee for 12th place.

    All of ELACs seven runners placed ahead of the entire San Diego Christian team.

    For more on this story, visit elaccampusnews.com.

    CN/JuliaNNe obregoN

    BY liliana marquezStaff Writer

    Cross country team shocks four-year universities

    BY tadzio garciaStaff Writer

    goalMembers from El Camino College Garett Bucheli, left, Jose Sanchez, Luis Najera and Branddon Cando fail to prevent ELACs Alfredo Leon from scoring yesterday during a South Coast Conference match at Weingart Stadium.

    We knew it was going to be very physical. Its always hard to come to ELAC and try to get a (good) result because

    they know how to play.

    ever morataYaEl Camino Assistant Coach

    CN/TaDZio garCia

    STriKiNg TeCHNiQueEast Los Angeles College forward Blakeley F icenec attempts a crossing pass to a midfielder in a 4-1 win against El Camino College yesterday at Weingart stadium.

  • www.ELACCampusNews.com

    EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE CAMPUS NEWSWEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014 Arts 5

    Robert Beltran successfully brings William Shakespeares Julius Caesar to life at the Casa 0101Theater in Boyle Heights.

    Julius Caesar has forty-four roles that are played by eighteen actors whom are mostly Latina/o.

    Caesar, played by Vance Valencia, is a highly respected man among the Roman citizens and when he returns victorious from war a plot for his death is put into play.

    The play begins when Flavius, played by Ray Rios, and Marullus, played by Uvaldo Baltazar, happen upon citizens that have abandoned their work to celebrate the return of Caesar.

    Flavius and Marcus show their disapproval of the citizens actions and proceed to remove any decorations they see on statues of Caesar.

    On his way to the arena, a stranger comes to Caesar to warn him to be cautious of the fifteenth of March.

    Caesar quickly dismisses the stranger and proceeds to the arena with his entourage.

    As Caesar leaves, Cassius, played by Fidel Gomez, and Brutus, played by Rachel Gomez, stay behind.

    Together Fidel Gomez and Rachel Gomez brought their characters to life and created a memorable act.

    Cassius is filled with jealousy over Caesars power and tries to convince Brutus that he would be a better ruler.

    When they hear shouts coming from the distance, Brutus shares his fears of the possibility that Caesar will become king.

    After the games have finished Cassius and Brutus are told by Casca, played by Danny Mora, that Caesar was offered the crown by Antony, played by Lauren Ballesteros, and he refused it three times.

    Fearing the possibility that Caesar would change if he chooses to be crowned, Brutus agrees to do along

    Casa 0101 brings Julius Caesar to East LABY JULIANNE OBREGON

    Staff Writer

    with Cassiuss plan.Even though there were a few

    stumbles in lines, the actors and actresses worked well together and made the play memorable.

    Performances by Ballesteros, playing the role of Antony, and Rachel Gomez prove that women can effectively play the role of men without taking away from the quality of the story.

    The use of lighting was effective, bringing more drama to the climatic scenes.

    The play was well executed and

    is worth watching. Four ELAC students were given

    the opportunity to be a part of the production.

    Evan Garcia, plays several roles; Titinius, Lucillius, Antonys Servant, Publius, Cobbler and Third Citizen; Karlo Ishibashi plays Octavius; Mario Valdez, plays Trebonius, Lepidus and Citizen; and Peter Mendoza, was the Fight Choreographer.

    The play is two hours and thirty minutes long with a ten minute intermission.

    Jul ius Caesar wil l have performances at the Casa 0101 Theater on Fridays and Sundays at 8 p.m. and on Sundays at 5 p.m. from now until Nov. 16.

    No performance on Sunday, Nov. 9.

    This is the f i rs t t ime the Shakespeare tragedy has been played in the Casa 0101 Theaters main stage and is part of Encuentro 2014, A National Latina/o Theatre Festival.

    For more information visit casa0101.org.

    Nightcrawler takes audience to dark corners of LA

    Courtesy of open road films

    deViousLouis Bloom, played by Jake Gyllenhaal, comes into the local news station in hopes of selling his footage of a bloody accident. News Manager Nina Romina, played by Rene Russo, sends Louis to the right people.

    BY AYANA ARROYOStaff Writer

    Courtesy of big maChine reCords

    New sound shows growth of Taylor Swift

    Hanging up her hat and cowboy boots Taylor Swift decided to steer away from country music with her newest album, 1989.

    Swift tried something new and it does not disappoint.

    With most of her songs, being up beat and playful, Swift doesnt seem, at all, a newcomer to pop music.

    1989, has a total of 13 songs, on the standard version, and 19 on the delux version, which have a very fun-dancing beat.

    The listeners can no longer find the relatable, meaningful lyrics found in her previous four albums.

    Swifts newest album still delivers catchy tunes that the listeners cant help, but sing along to.

    1989, was named after Swifts birth year.

    Swifts music is set apart from other pop stars.

    This approach with all the songs on the album being as fun as her recent hit single Shake it off makes a difference.

    There are still some songs about heartbreaks such as All you had to do was stay but Swift decided

    to no longer focus on those same subjects as she did on her previous album Red.

    Instead she focused on the pure thrill of life and its experiences.

    1989 is not for crying over an ex-boyfriend, its for getting up, dancing and shaking off the difficult times life may bring.

    Swifts album has no other message, like her previous four albums did.

    Instead, 1989 is just a very blunt phrase of being completely comfortable with who someone is and not caring what anyone else thinks about them.

    The album allows the listener to feel as bubbly as Swifts sound on it. It makes listeners feel at ease and comfortable.

    With her first full pop album, she stepped out of her comfort zone, into a genre already filled with endless amounts of huge pop stars and is hardly noticeable with the results of this work.

    1989, is Swifts riskiest album and as a result her best so far.

    The album was created by Swifts experiences and the journey of discovering who she is and songs show that to its listeners.

    Swifts 1989 is now available in stores and on iTunes.

    BY JEsUs FIGUEROAStaff Writer

    The cut-throat world of broadcast journalism gets a frightening and intense portrayal in Nightcrawler.

    The meticulous manner of Louis Bloom, played by Jake Gyllenhaal, captures the audiences attention from beginning to end.

    Louis is an outcast and loner with great ambition.

    Gyllenhaal portrays Louis as intense character who is capable of doing anything necessary to get ahead.

    The intensity of the character does not fade throughout the film and yet the audience ends up rooting for him.

    Louis finds excitement and acceptance through f i lming dangerous crime scene footage for local television stations.

    The local news manager Nina Romina, played by Rene Russo, brings the notion of whatever bleeds, leads to the mind of Louis, who becomes more determined to make his pretense known as a stringer or nightcrawler.

    Russo brings a realistic feel to her role which makes audiences believe

    her troubles and struggles. She comes off as desperate and

    composed through the turmoil she has to deal with, but she does it in a manner which makes it relatable.

    Quickly, Louis realizes that to be at the top of his profession he will need help.

    The awkward charisma of this character thats work driven brings in Rick, played by Riz Ahmed, as an unpaid intern who follows along with Louis crazy ideas without much question.

    Ahmed has a hard task to do as he plays a junkie who is trying to keep a steady job.

    The submissive character he plays contrast well with Louis and the team has a feel of unity.

    The movie begins to take a quicker pace as the story progresses meaning for a fantastic thriller.

    The ending is eerie and strangely feels true to life.

    Nightcrawler is out in theaters this Friday and is rated R for violence including graphic images and for strong language.

    During a round table discussion Gyllenhaal talked about developing his character and the influences which helped in making his portrayal

    of Louis life-like.We (Gyllenhaal and Giltroy)

    talked a lot about coyotes. We talked a lot about the animal kingdoms here and around LA, especially those that come out at night, the wild animals that come down and are just surviving, Gyllenhaal said.

    Dan (Giltroy) is very thin and theres this aspect to him. He sits very straight when he talks. Theres something about him. He was an influence on me in developing the character. His clothes fit him a certain way. I was really inspired by that.

    Gyllenhaal said that theres a point where you start to root for Louis even when you are not supposed to.

    Theres a point, when he goes in to that house, where you are just like No. Dont go into that house, or Dont get caught by the cops, Gyllenhaal said.

    The realistic feel of this movie is overshadowed by the depth and darkness of its content, but Russo takes it as it just being life.

    People say Oh my god, the films so dark. I say at some points it is dark, but in some points, its also realistic, Russo said.

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    last embraCeJulius Caesar, played by Vance Valencia, and wife Calphurnia, played Christine Avila, embrace as she tells him her prophetic dream of his demise.

    Cn/Jesus figueroa

  • www.ELACCampusNews.com

    WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2014Feature6 EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE CAMPUS NEWS

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    Kaiser blood drive visits South Gate campus

    GivinG backStudents Carla Cristales, left and Hugo Alverado sign up to donate blood with Kaiser Permanentes Blood and Platelet Recruitment Coordinator Tiffany K. Laffitte at the East Los Angeles College South Gate Center on Tuesday.

    BY Jade IngladaStaff Writer

    cn/Jade inGlada

    Students and the local community were given the oppurtunity to donate blood with the Kaiser Permanente recently introduced ALYX Component Collection System at the South Gate Center yesterday.

    This was one of the first times Kaiser offered this option at ELAC.

    The ALYX System is a machine that collects a donors blood through a small needle and separates red blood cells from plasma and platelets.

    This process takes twice the amount of red blood cells and replaces the blood with saline when the plasma and platelets are sent back into the donor. Donors must have 38-40 percent iron levels to use the machine and also be within height and weight regulations.

    Using the ALYX system is equivalent to making two donations in one visit, Laffitte said. Its cleaner

    and more efficient than donating through the traditional method that uses blood bags and a filter.

    Blood and Platelet Recruitment Coordinator Tiffany K. Laffitte was in charge of the blood drive.

    Roni lets us use the rooms here for free since were a nonprofit and she loves to sponsor the blood drives, Laffitte said.

    Inouye is in charge of student activities at the South Gate Campus.

    Kaiser Permanente has been holding blood drives at the South Gate campus for about three years. We usually have a good turnout. Everyone around here is really supportive and were grateful to be here, Laffitte said.

    Students Juan Torres and Ricardo Gonzalez are returning donors at South Gate.

    This is my second time donating at South Gate, Torres said. I like the way they run things here, theyre pretty organized.

    Almost 100 people signed up to donate. According to Laffitte, most

    of the people that donate blood have already donated before.

    All donors received a t-shirt and a $5 In-N-Out gift card. People that used the ALYX system to donate blood received two gift cards. The motivation is a double-double, Laffitte said. Poor college students need to eat.

    Community were welcomed to give blood as long as the donors were at least 17-years-old, weighed over 100 pounds and had a photo I.D. By donating, a person has the opportunity to save up to three lives.

    People that were sick, had a tattoo that was less than a year old or had any serious heart problems over the past six months were not allowed to donate. Its not that theres anything wrong with their blood, were just more concerned about their health, Laffitte said.

    Unless the Associated Student Union sponsors the blood drive at the main campus, a healthcare establishment has to pay to rent the space if its holding the drive.

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