ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results ?· ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative…

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ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology PORTFOLIOS 1. Please circle a number to indicate, to the best of your knowledge, any current school board policy for digital storage of student work. 0 1 2 3 Our school board has no policy at the present time regarding digital storage of student work. Our school board policy regarding digital storage of student work does not require each school to provide digital storage space. Our school board policy requires all schools to provide digital storage which is made available to teachers and students as needed. Our school board policy requires all schools to provide digital storage and all teachers to use the storage for all students. RESPONSES: 151 18 11 8 Total Responses: 188 Skipped this Question: 14 80% of respondents (151 out of 188) say they have no policy regarding digital storage of student work. This data was supported by several comments about current policies, as well as the need to develop policies. Others commented on how they currently store digital work, while others spoke about storage solutions they are considering, or mentioned financial concerns. The data suggests that districts would welcome guidance on developing policies for digital storage, as well as sample policies and storage configurations. Comments about Policies for Digital Portfolio Storage Many commented that their school boards Acceptable Use Policy for technology does not speak to the storage question: Although we have an appropriate use policy / agreement, the policy does not specifically address storage. We have a policy regarding the required length of time digital records are stored, but the policy had system logs in mind. No current policy addresses requirements for storage of student data. We have an extensive system to store digital work, but NOT from a school board policy standpoint. The board has yet to develop a computer use policy although individual schools have. Some comments spoke to concerns about their boards having to develop policies: Most school boards don't have a clue on how to implement this concept. This needs to be standardized by the state. This really needs to be brought to superintendents and school boards because I don't know that they understand the ramifications of what this means, especially in terms of long term storage and finance of that as well as oversight. We need 'model policy' for our school boards. Other respondents felt confident about their relationship with their school board in terms of policy development and support: Our board leaves it to us. Our school board, while limited in funding, is very supportive. Comments about Current Storage Options at Different Grades Many commented about the storage configurations currently in use: We configure to save to staff folders, and teachers teach students to save to network folders from grades 6-12. All students have a folder on the network. The high school does operate under #3 (storage required for all students and teachers). All students 6-12 have digital storage. All students have individual space on 'H' drive starting at 5th grade. The high school has student accounts. The elementary schools do not. We do keep storage files for all staff and students, grades 3-12. We have digital storage for middle and high school students but not elementary students. I don't believe its a requirement at this point. We provide digital storage to students and teachers (personal accounts with passwords for all in building). All students and teachers have digital storage. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology As tech lab teacher, I have formally implemented electronic portfolios during 2004-05 school year. I collect input for grades 1-8 to be added together each year. 8th grade students are given their portfolio upon graduation. At elementary, students save to teacher folder yet at upper elementary and middle, have specific student storage space. Flash drives might be a solution for storage and moving the digital portfolio. It has started at the junior high level. Our tech integrator has developed a portfolio template to be used at the high school level and the middle school students do save work in a portfolio folder, but I do not know how and if it is assessed. Students in grades 5-12 have storage space available but there is no board policy or requirement - currently it is at the discretion of the network administrator. Students have network folders to use for a year. They get cleared out each year. Teachers do not have access to see student work. The district's technology committee is working on developing the protocol for digital portfolios. It's good to know that SPDC will be offering assistance on this endeavor. Digital space is allocated per student, minimal space available. We will be adjusting our tech plan to include portfolios. We have already changed credit requirements to include an additional 1/2 credit computer literacy requirement. Comments about Storage Suggestions for Future It was clear that many districts have some storage solution now, but that its not necessarily a policy to do so, and that they are thinking of doing something different in the future: Could be done with a server or servers dedicated to student work and projects. Down the line there should be a statewide web based area for public student work. Flash drives might be a solution for storage and moving the digital portfolio. Staff and students have storage available to them. Looking forward to seeing a 'template' for this. This [policy question] relates most specifically to the portfolio process many schools lack in collecting artifacts. How do you mandate organization or is it a culture? We need to provide a higher level of training for our teachers. We will need to increase storage resources. We're really just starting to get our technology plan implemented. We are looking at Moodle. Right now, every kid has their own folder but we're not managing the content. Comments about Budget Impact Some comments reflected financial concerns: If work is saved with portfolios in mind, I do not know if enough space is available and what the fiscal implications would be. Budget committee wants to cut all new equipment purchases. [This is a] massive undertaking - huge $ investment necessary. My issues center around 4 different districts and 4 distinct challenges. Resources are a BIG challenge in all 3 districts! This really needs to be brought to superintendents and school boards because I don't know that they understand the ramifications of what this means, especially in terms of long term storage and finance of that as well as oversight. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology 2. Please circle a number to indicate, to the best of your knowledge, how students currently store digital artifacts at your school(s). (If you work at the district/SAU level, use comment area to distinguish any variances in current practices from school to school.) 0 1 2 3 4 There is no consistent practice in our school regarding digital storage of students work. Some of our teachers ensure that students save their work on CDs in some of our classes. All of our teachers ensure that students save their work on CDs in all of our classes. Some of our teachers ensure that students save their work in a file folder on the school server in some of our classes. All of our teachers ensure that students save their work in all of our classes on the school server or a purchased web storage system. RESPONSES: 60 18 2 98 21 Total Responses: 199 Skipped this Question: 3 Nearly half (49%) of respondents said some, but not all teachers, save their work on the school server, while 30% of respondents indicate there is no consistent practice at their school for digital storage. This data supports several comments about the range of current practices in use in schools across the state. The data suggests that districts would benefit from models of affordable storage configurations appropriate for elementary, middle, and high school levels, as well as assistance on ways to adapt classroom curriculum as storage options change and as they become more familiar with the ICT standards. Comments about Current Storage Methods Many commented about current use of the school server for storage of student work. Usage ranged from no teacher direction to specific requests from teachers to save on the server, and usage tended to be different from elementary to middle to high school. It was also apparent that some participants were aware of storage practices at their own school but not at the schools within their district where students had come from or were going to: Only a few teachers have students save to folders on server (many older students do this without their teachers' awareness). At high school, some teachers have students save to folders on server. At other schools, some teachers have students save work to CDs. Access is available to ALL, and many teachers direct students to use their assigned accounts and 100 MB storage on the high school network. All teachers and students have folders on file server. Currents clean out at end of school year. Need to rethink and look at space. All teachers that make use of digital media require students to save work on school server. Physical education, elementary, and other teachers don't. Our middle and high school students have file folders, as do all teachers. Elementary students do not. There is no consistent practice among middle school classroom teachers. The students are supposed to save to personal drives on the server and to class/individual folders on server for primary school. However, not all teachers ensure that the students do this. It is done whenever students are in the lab. We save the students' work (grades 1-8) on our server Grades 5-8 have always saved their work on personal drives. Grades 1-4 have saved to a class folder, which was purged at the end of the year. This year, we created individual folders for each student in grades 1-8 (within a class folder). The individual folders will then 'move' with the students (i.e., from grade 1 teacher to grade 2 teacher). Each student has his/her own folder on the server. Elementary students can store some work on the network but it is up to the teacher and not really used for any assessment in most cases. I think middle school students can save on the network. I don't think the HS students save on the network. Folders with student names are on a school server. Grade 5-8 students use their folders but not on a regular basis. I'm not sure what the elementary schools do, or whether HS students have any long term storage on the server. At the middle school, they have user accounts that they will keep through 8th grade. Most students save their work on discs when they are unable to access the server. Network storage for high school students but not at lower levels. Required strongly -> save work both on school server (and also duplicate files recommended on flash drives). Students all have space on the server and are encouraged to save work there. Teachers are less comfortable with this process. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology The school has a shared drive on which students may save work. However, student work on the shared drive is not password protected, nor is the drive backed up frequently enough to ensure complete saving of the work. They [students] are told to provide disks, CDs, or jump drives and to not save things on computers. This is a passive system. All K-12 students have an individual storage location on our server. This is more consistent in the 8-12 classes. Once again, digital portfolios will drive our decisions in K-6. This step is modified to: Data is collected each year All students [in classrooms and computer lab] work in and save to their 'computer folder' from grades 1-8. At the end of 8th grade, all folders by year go on a CD and are given to students. We have file servers at our HS and they are used, not mandatory. K-8 schools use disc as needed. We have limited space. We have some storage on CD and some on a file folder on the server. There is no consistency in the district. Comments about Planned Changes in Storage Methods There were several comments about what the district is doing or needs to do to change their storage infrastructure: [The] elementary school has just recently begun to address and acquire the needed infrastructure to enable teacher and student access to computers and technology. [The] middle school has the infrastructure but lacks accessibility for teachers and students to technology. [The recently renovated] high school has the infrastructure and accessibility for all but needs staff development, as do all schools, to achieve the standard. In the elementary, we are moving towards a more standardized approach to digital storage. Tech department is currently working on solutions. In the past, all middle school students have had storage on a school server. We plan to make the storage available to them in elementary, as well, using 'open directory.' Middle school is purchasing a network server this spring for student work. The determining factor is whether or not the technology used has disk drive storage capability vs server access. 'Home' is an important factor. Storage will not be an issue. We are entertaining thoughts of creating web-based portfolios in each of the students' home directories on our Novell network that will follow them from elementary through grade 12. Server space is available. Not all teachers know how to have students use it. Some teachers use it all the time. Comments about No Storage Methods There were a few comments about no existing storage infrastructure being in place: [There is] no coordinated storage. There are pockets of interest and a handful who have experimented (2 or 3 in 182 staff) across 11 schools. [There is] no existing infrastructure and/or delivery system for individual student storage. Training is an issue, too. [There is] no storage in place at our school or elementary level, but the high school in our district provides each student with a folder/space for work. Comments about Teacher Use and Training Needs There is a need for workshop sessions to discuss and create K-8 curriculum standards. Foundational level needs to be further defined. Continued training and coordination with our computer/tech coordinator will get us to level 4 [i.e., all teachers using server storage]. Although ALL our teachers should ensure, only some of our teachers do. I think this [question 2] relates back to 'purpose.' What is the purpose of the portfolio? If the purpose is portability and HS entrance, this behavior might differ from if the portfolio is specific to measuring ICT literacy. It's not the teachers at the K-5 level. It is the one person who teaches how to use software who ensures that students know how to save their work. There is no tech program that addresses elementary benchmarks - and no money to get one! Training is an issue, too. Of course, there are always some teachers who do not utilize technology. Server space is available. Not all teachers know how to have students use it. Some teachers use it all the time. Teachers are less comfortable with this process [of saving student work on the server]. Very few teachers in my school are aware of this availability. Most teachers do not use technology or do not require students to share work. Very inconsistent here - some teachers ensure all student work is saved to their network folder whereas other teachers allow students to do much of their work at home. How do we ensure students can share their proficiency if a large percentage of technology related work is done at home and brought in to school completed (i.e., hard copy)? ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology We are a laptop initiative school and are pushing the envelope in our district. It's coming, slowly. Our SAU needs goals and objectives for technology. We are dual platform (Windows and Apple) so although students are capable of saving to servers, the teachers don't necessarily advocate it. Currently we are offering teacher tech seminars to help. We will need money to train our staff to be able to do portfolios. We would like workshop sessions to discuss and create K-8 ICT curriculum / rubric. 3. Based on your knowledge of your school / district, what kind of portfolio assistance do you think needs to be provided so that your school / district can best address portfolio creation and storage requirements? 0 1 2 3 I think we dont need any portfolio assistance because we already have the necessary staff, storage arrangements, and expertise to organize student files in a way that facilitates assessment of portfolio contents. I think our teachers will have no problem with basic file storage but will need assistance in establishing common organizing structures for student work to facilitate assessment of portfolio contents. I think our teachers will need assistance in (a) establishing common organizing structures for student work and (b) making curriculum revisions to ensure students produce digital artifacts to create quality portfolios. I think our teachers will need assistance in (a) establishing common organizing structures for student work, (b) making curriculum revisions to ensure students produce digital artifacts to create quality portfolios, and (c) basic file storage arrangements. RESPONSES: 4 18 71 101 Total Responses: 194 Skipped this Question: 8 Nearly all (89%) of respondents indicate teachers in their schools will need portfolio assistance, including portfolio organizing structures and curriculum revision assistance, while a large portion of respondents (57%) said they will also need help with file storage. This data is supported by comments that indicate many districts are already working on changes to their current program, but that they need assistance and guidance and feel their administration will need to be informed and supportive of their efforts. Their comments suggest that districts would benefit from (1) access to portfolio training materials and portfolio models that they can take back to their own districts and incorporate into local work, (2) training that includes portfolio models which have already been created in districts, (3) training delineated for grade levels at elementary, middle, and high school, (4) training that begins with mapping current school curriculum to the standards in order to create portfolio requirements, and (5) training that helps key staff to collaborate on this work from their respective roles as administrators, classroom teachers, library media specialists, technology integrators, computer lab teachers, and technology coordinators. Comments about What Districts Are Already Doing to Address New Standards Many participants cited proactive steps that are already underway, indicating a positive outlook: As a school library media specialist, I have been trying to work integrated info lit skills into subject area curricula for many years. I am well aware of the challenges with this. It is a worthy goal! Grade 8 students currently build a portfolio in 3 ring binders that contains examples of achievement/work in content areas of math, social studies, language arts, and science. Teachers have developed rubrics for all of these props that meet NH frameworks and GLEs. Given adequate accessibility and infrastructure, it is not much of a stretch to use the grade 8 model and move it down to lower grades and up to high school. We are already developing this assistance through an initiative in our new tech plan. We adopted the NETS standards with our previous plan, but we're now building rubrics at each grade level to assist teachers as they assess whether or not their students are meeting these benchmarks. I think we have adequate resources in our district to provide professional development or assistance. The technology educators will be meeting next month to begin this process. We will also pull in teachers working on curriculum for discussions - revisions. This is what we are working on now with teams of teachers K-4 and 5-8. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology We are working as a group to make this happen. We currently have a committee working on this. We have taken a step in the right direction by hiring a technology integration specialist. We have developed K-8 benchmarks to begin portfolio discussion this spring. Comments about Administrative and Financial Support Some participants cited budget concerns and about their administrators needing to be more informed: But not just teachers! Administrators need to hear these new standards and be aware too! So do school boards - think about going to the state school board association meeting to tell them, too. Help! Resources are short, as well as knowledge to do this work. Time is short, too. Many (teachers) are already capable. However, many would need substantial support and assistance. Monies are at a shortage for more storage space and another technology person for our district. Our district is probably all over the place here, but would like to see a unified process. Teachers will also need a computer to do so. The assistance needed would be due to budget constraints. This will be a total shift in my district. We will need mandatory staff development workshops for our staff. We need to have more discussions at the administrative level on the long term storage issue. Comments about Acceptance of Approach I do believe our teachers will, for the most part, do a portfolio continuing collection of student progress. Most teachers in our district don't have enough (if any) background / knowledge in computer technology. Until you get teachers competent, ICT literacy with students won't work. We'd be starting from scratch; above all would be to shift the teachers in their BELIEF that this is the way to go. We have technology staff that can do this. All teachers will not be able to do on their own. Our teachers need assistance and leadership all the way. Comments about How to Structure Training Suggestions were made about how to offer effective training. These comments should be combined with those made about training needs under question 2: Different grade levels are at different levels of computer literacy and therefore have different needs. Each student in grades 6-12 has a folder available to them on the school network. There is no formal organization established. We need to know how to assess content. Examples of portfolio structures and rubrics would be helpful. How do we show ethical use of technology? [There is] great disparity amongst teachers in abilities. Helping schools define purpose and vision would be the most valuable consultation. Many schools cannot articulate a purpose and vision that is clear and tangible. I believe we will need to have some type of training for teachers. We will need assistance in establishing what to do. I look forward to viewing sample portfolios. I think portfolios are needed and quite beneficial, however I feel that we need more direction from the DOE for consistency (i.e., templates). I would love a meeting on structure of portfolios. Making curriculum revisions is most applicable. Most teachers in our district don't have enough (if any) background / knowledge in computer technology. Until you get teachers competent, ICT literacy with students won't work. Some of our teachers are at level 1 or better [i.e., understand storage structure], but we have a number of teachers who need everything. Therefore, building wide we need quite a lot of intervention. Teachers are knowledgeable about building portfolios. We could use direction on requirements/standards. We do not have the personnel or capacity to monitor and evaluate portfolios for all of our students. Teachers in our district need professional development that will help integrate technology into curriculum. We do have the storage capability; however there will be a need for helping teachers with curriculum revisions. We have the hardware but need the rubric guidelines to meet state requirements. We haven't given any thought to portfolios. We will need professional development for all teachers PLUS administrative and assessment training for those who will be responsible for those jobs. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 4. Based on your knowledge of the high school in your district, indicate to what extent the current course options meet the new standards. This will help identify any areas of weakness. 0 1 2 3 Our high school doesnt provide any of the topic areas in standard 306.42(c). Students have been expected to complete the middle school course and/or a basic proficiency test in order to meet the credit. Our high school provides a combined course addressing all four topic areas in standard 306.42(c). Our high school provides a range of courses that each address one of the four topic areas in standard 306.42(c). Our high school provides both a combined course addressing all four topic areas in standard 306.42(c) and also other courses which address one or more of the topic areas. RESPONSES: 24 17 54 18 Total Responses: 113 Skipped this Question: 89 Most (64%) of respondents said their high school offers courses to address the four topics in the new standards, either through a range of courses (48%) or through a course which combines the four topics into one (16%). A smaller number (21%) of respondents indicate their high school courses dont address any of the topics within the new standards, expecting students to complete the high school credit in middle school. This data is supported by comments indicating there is great variety in NH high school course offerings from one high school to another regarding courses that would meet the topics within the ICT literacy standards. The data suggests that districts could benefit from curriculum mapping assistance specific to the ICT standards, as well as a forum, either online or face-to-face, where they could learn how other high school course options are configured to meet the standards. Comments about Topics Addressed by Current Courses Some participants said they offer some of the high school specified topics: [Our courses] address two of the four topics (1 and 2). [We have a] mandatory computer applications class and one credit tech communications (e-portfolio, html, web, multimedia). All [four topics] exist, however with only 1/2 credit and computer literacy required, most never take a higher level tech course. Based on my 12th grader, I would say it has been 0 [our high school doesnt provide the four topics listed in the new standards]. It may have changed since 7/1/05. Individual courses make great use of technology -- Powerpoint, Excel -- as well as great online research tools. [We] absolutely do not provide a range of courses that each address one of the four topics. Computer lit for 9th [grade] addresses old standards, but could be tweaked for new. Our courses collectively address each of the 4 topics but not in each course. Our district's high school only offers course work related to c.1 (common productivity and web based software) and c.4 (programming concepts). Our high school has a wide variety of computer classes, but not tied to digital portfolios. Our high school offers a computer applications course which covers many but not all requirements. Our technology courses are provided through the business department and in Project Lead the Way. There is no tech/computer department and no 'survey' course in the high school. There is a general survey/intro course in the middle school. We are part of a technology center which provides some of the courses to SOME of our students. We are working on revamping our HS curriculum and we also have an IT&Me course and IT&Me Works course. We have various electives such as CAD, business education, GPS (vocational center), HS computer literacy, desktop publishing, and web page design. We used to have a required ICT literacy type class (class of 2006). We have desktop publishing, web page design, MS office class that help meet standards now. Computer literacy was moved to 9th grade. [There is] no proficiency test. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology Comments about the Big Picture Currently, we offer computer applications - required 6 blocks per semester. Cisco went by the wayside, [because] teachers didn't keep up [their] certification and it wasn't enforced. I feel that it has to be changed from the top down. Technology is not a priority but I feel we have a good base. I don't feel we teach networking adequately. I expect these four are covered if you search across many course curricula; but do not hit all kids. Nothing fits. Our H.S. literacy course covers Word and Excel. The problem is that these are all electives and there is no real coordination to ensure that all 4 competencies are met by any one student. There's been an interesting evolution at [our district]. This year, the middle schools have started providing the basic course you spoke about today, but using old high school standards. We currently send our students on to Concord. We would need to talk with them about offerings. We need to work with them to see what they want to redo. Answering this question in the context of a curriculum map would be VERY relevant. Students in the past were only required to complete middle school 1/2 credit to cover HS credit. The 0 answers (not providing topics at high school level and yet teaching credit at middle school) has been hashed around in several committees. I would like to see some virtual offering and eLearning online for students. Our school is small, so our offerings are less than what I would like to see for students. We do not have the capacity to offer courses for all students (hardware, personnel, etc.). What constitutes a computer course? Comments about No High School or Dont Know Many participants who work at the K-8 level commented that they are unfamiliar with what their high school offers: I am in the elementary so I am unaware of courses offered to fill the requirements. I am not familiar enough with the high school's current/future course options to comfortably answer this question. I am not sure of our high school's technology program. I am too new to our district to rate our high school on this question. I'm embarrassed that I don't know, for sure. I have no idea. There is not much 'sharing' from the high school. YES NO MAYBE 5. Does your school / district already have curriculum materials, courses, and a portfolio process in place that you feel is already consistent with these new standards? 8 128 28 Total Responses: 164 Skipped this Question: 38 YES NO MAYBE 6. Are you willing to share it with other districts by making it available through the New Hampshire ICT Literacy website? 23 20 24 Total Responses: 67 Skipped this Question: 135 Most participants (78%) who responded to this question said their district has no materials or process that they can share. If they do have something in place, respondents were split three ways in their willingness to share what they have with other districts (will share, may share, wont share). Although many did not answer questions 5 and 6 or felt they had nothing to share yet, many respondents commented on what they were doing at either the high school or the K-8 level or about how they intend to approach this work. The data suggests that much work needs to be done in order to build a common repository of materials accessible to all New Hampshire districts and useful in meeting individual district needs. It also suggests that a strategy to extend the standards resources on NH Educators Online (www.nheon.org) might begin with a needs assessment of (a) the purpose of providing such resources to all districts and (b) the best format to provide resources of value and usefulness. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology Comments about High school Work In web design, students have created portfolios which include: intro, resume, academic with project samples, extra curricular evidence, community, and photo gallery. IT and ME is already out there. We have a 3-part senior project: (1) 5-7 page research paper with MLA format, 2) performance piece with actual physical result, 3) presentation to community (twice, once to an assessment team and once to parents & visitors). We have courses (such as computer graphics, Cisco, computer animation, etc.) to share but do not have a portfolio process to share. Comments about K-8 Work As an elementary school, we currently offer a basic keyboarding class, as well as teach various software use and after school programs such as Digital Photography. At the elementary level, I have some ideas of what we might place in a digital portfolio K-5. [We have a] middle school computer ed program - portfolio and performance assessments (rubrics) Its not completed yet, but we are working on web-based portfolio structure. We don't have a portfolio process - everything else is at a good starting place. I think our curriculum already addresses the standards. We need to figure out how to include it in a portfolio and to further integrate it into core classes. iMapping curriculum website [We can] show examples of student work from grades 1-8, and share lessons (overviews) of how we produce our portfolio work. [We are] still working on the management piece of the portfolio process. We have a draft of a 9-12 digital portfolio using web (html) pages. We still need to design an assessment rubric. We have skills and rubric documents based on NETS in place this year, but they don't include a portfolio piece. I think it will be easy to add this piece. You can view our skills, rubrics, and a teacher 'cheat sheet' at http://www.sau17.org/tech/literacy.htm. Comments in general about possibly having material to share Several participants indicated theyd love to share when their materials are ready: As we work we would love to share our progress. [Here are] some online resources I have recently purchased - Nettrekker, Student Resource Center, Choices, Encyclopedia Britannica. As tech partners participants in 2004-05 service project, we created a 'booklet' Powerpoint and brochures produced on computers. We are in the process of developing a portfolio process and should have a good foundation by the end of the school year. Comments about Funding [Our district] has had a default budget for three years. This year, the adapted budget was BELOW the default. Talk with these groups: school board association, principals association, superintendents group. We are hoping to address this in our tech plan this year. We had a digital portfolio with our Competency Based Assessment program. It was disbanded as of last year. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology ASSESSMENT RUBRICS 7. Please indicate your familiarity with the following resources by checking the appropriate box: Resource Never heard of it Heard of it but havent used it Used it at least once or twice Use it often ICT Literacy Maps for Content Areas developed by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills and located in Publications section of site http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/ 53 96 34 10 Second Information Technology in Education Study http://sitesm2.org/ 137 45 6 1 The Digital Portfolio: A Richer Picture of Student Performance found in assessment resources section of the CES National Web http://www.essentialschools.org/cs/resources/view/ces_res/225 111 56 19 2 RubiStar for creating project-based learning rubrics part of the 4Teachers.org website http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php 60 37 51 38 Kathy Schrocks Assessment & Rubrics Section of her website http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/assess.html 44 41 67 38 Dr. Helen Barretts websites on Electronic Portfolios: http://www.electronicportfolios.com/ or http://www.helenbarrett.com/ plus more on the ALI site: http://ali.apple.com/ali_sites/ali/exhibits/1000156/Introduction.html 139 27 18 7 Digital Transformation: A Framework for ICT Literacy report by ETS on an international panel convened to study ICT http://www.ets.org/research/researcher/ICT-REPORT.html 120 50 18 6 ICT Literacy.Info Resources http://www.ictliteracy.info/ICT-Research.htm 73 73 38 7 737 425 251 109 8. Based on your knowledge of your school / district, what kind of assessment rubric development assistance do you think needs to be provided so that your school / district can best address the assessment requirements? 0 1 2 3 I think we dont need any portfolio assistance because we already have the necessary expertise to work on this. I think we could use some help but would handle it on our own if there wasnt any outside resource available. I think our teachers will need assistance from outside resources, such as rubric development sessions provided by the Center Network. I think we will want to use common assessment rubrics designed by a statewide committee made up of representatives from various districts. RESPONSES: 10 45 87 45 Total Responses: 187 Skipped this Question: 15 Nearly half (47%) of those responding to this question felt teachers will need help with rubric development, while another 24% felt they might use some help but would handle it on their own if no help was available. Another 24% said they would use common rubrics if developed by a statewide committee. This division of thought on rubric assistance is reflected similarly in the variety of comments. The data suggests that a statewide committee to develop common rubrics would be valuable, and that rubric development sessions held at the Centers would also provide valuable assistance to districts. It also suggests that these two aspects of the work should occur simultaneously, perhaps with committees at each Center providing input to a statewide committee. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology Comments about Level of Assistance Needed or Wanted Some participants felt confident their district can develop their own assessment rubrics and probably didnt need assistance: At this stage [we don't need any assistance.] Perhaps when we get started we'll need assistance. For now, it is difficult to say whether we'll need help or not. Because we have not addressed portfolios, I don't know what level of assistance we would need or if we would want to use a common rubric. I feel that we have a very good start in the process and need to work on the portfolio piece to reflect in an electronic way what our rubric does on paper. Right now, we are using the rubrics created by Learning Resources, Inc. based on ISTE. We have K-8 benchmarks based on ISTE student standards. We have been working on standards, lesson plans and rubrics K-8. We need some guidelines, but I would prefer to make our own rubrics. We are currently in process of writing and putting together our 6-8 rubric. No, but you should create a blog. We need a strong e-portfolio: Using NETS, broken down by grade, [our district will] make a plan for teachers that will give them examples of technology integration projects that will make good examples for portfolios. [The district can] move the computer teacher (specialist position) into integration. [Our] Library Media Specialist is already teaching Info Literacy. The Lead teacher on each grade level team can help with integration. Some schools hire an extra library media specialist to promote integration. The role of the new integration specialist is key. We are having a technology fair. Student work created for the fair will be saved to use in future student portfolios. Some participants felt it made more sense to adopt a common set of rubrics: Common assessment rubrics developed by others makes a lot of sense as well. Common statewide rubrics would be something we would like to work on given the opportunity. In order to keep us all on a level playing field, a common rubric would be great for a kick start! Many of our teachers are NOT open to the 'not invented here' syndrome. Others are more than willing to get help from and share their thoughts on assessment. Consistency has a value in standards development! I would like to work with others to develop assessment rubrics. This depends on which district we're talking about at this time. At least one district will approach this differently. [We will need assistance,] at least in the first 2 years of this transitional process. I would LOVE to sit on a committee and help build the assessment piece. We would want to use and/or develop what is most convenient / immediately accessible for us. We are currently starting the process. We would love to work with others. We don't want to go out on a limb and find we are going in the wrong direction. I think our teachers will welcome statewide rubrics to start but will want to eventually develop their own versions that are specific to their programs. We need to discuss this with PD and technology standards committee. Were willing to work on common rubrics! We would like consistency, especially with a student population that tuitions to other districts. We would like to maintain some local identification in the process. I think standard rubrics need to be developed and shared with each school district. Appropriate rubric development is the key to success. It will guide teachers and activities. Comments about the Kind of Rubric Assistance Needed [We need assistance with] core curriculum. [We need] help - examples of portfolios, district plans, tech plans. I believe that the teachers in our district are all over the map on this subject. Many, especially in grades K-6 have zero to little access to technology in order to access ICT standards/rubrics, although I know that they have developed rubrics in their content areas and have the capability to work their way through developing rubrics for the standard. Once we have a rubric in place on the digital portfolio, I think we have the resources to handle it locally. The process of development of rubrics would be easier with a facilitator who could help direct the process. There are software packages available such as Choices that would facilitate integration of digital portfolio and other student work into a package that would include resume, course selection, history, interest surveys, capability tests, etc. We would love to see sample rubrics that would meet standards for ICT course and how standards can be integrated in core content courses. ICT Literacy Seminar Questionnaire: Narrative Results as of 3/24/06 New Hampshire Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology Participants were encouraged to make General Comments: I echo the sentiment that you should present this to superintendents and school boards association. In fact, it was only by chance that I learned of the new state minimum standards and have started reading them. Again, I think it is essential that someone highlight to superintendents the major changes in state minimum standards -- some have major implications. The message of the existence of standards needs to be delivered to school boards and superintendents directly. I think consistency across the board and direction is a must. I believe rubrics need to begin top down, from SAU tech committee, to the school tech committee, to the teacher. I would encourage a more detailed description of the standards. I would encourage that collaborative effort. Is there state help available? Please provide all the guidance and information rather than leave us to argue with our administration. It would be much appreciated! Current 9th graders think they have 1/2 credit from 8th grade - do they? The problem, of course, in common assessment rubrics is money and technology. Districts limited by funds might need state aid to provide the hardware and software. This entire concept needs to be standardized by the state and not a district. We want to make sure we are meeting state requirements. We would need money to implement this. Tell administrators and school boards! Vermont - digital portfolio program