Integrating Digital and Media Literacy in All Content ?· Integrating Digital and Media ... techniques…

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University of Wisconsin-Green Bay University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Division of Outreach and Adult Access, 1-800-621-2313 or 920-465-2480 Email: educationoutreach@uwgb.edu Website: www.uwgb.edu/educationoutreach 1 COURSE SYLLABUS Integrating Digital and Media Literacy in All Content Areas Please note this is considered a Fall 2013 course for reporting purposes, due to the start date occurring before the official start of the UW-Green Bay Spring 2014 semester. Instructors: Dena Budrecki and Jodi Timler Course #: ED & HUD 795-9, section 7413 (#0147D) Credit: Two (2) Graduate Credits Prerequisite: Graduate Standing (Must have earned a bachelors degree) Schedule: Wednesdays, January 22 & 29 (4-8 p.m.); February 5 & 12 (3 hours of writing outside of class); February 19 & 26 (4-8 p.m.); and March 5 & 12, 2014 (4-8 p.m.) Location: Plymouth School District Course Description: This course will focus on how to model digital literacies while using a plethora of digital tools. Teachers will explore how to teach digital writing by studying authors craft with the use of mentor texts, and will learn to rely on good pedagogy to guide their decision making when teaching digital writing. Course Emphasis and Rationale: Research in the fields of digital writing and adolescent literacy demonstrates that students become more engaged when we invite them to compose with digital media. This course will emphasize the comprehensive nature of digital literacy and how it applies across all curriculum areas. It will also address how digital writing can meet many of the Common Core State Standards. Teachers will examine different technology tools and online resources that will enhance student writing and comprehension, and help them keep on top of emerging literacies while strengthening pedagogy. Course Objectives: Understand the comprehensive nature of digital literacy and how it applies across all curriculum areas Learn different technology tools and online resources to stay abreast of emerging literacies and strengthen pedagogy Learn how to use technology to enhance student writing and comprehension in the classroom University of Wisconsin-Green Bay University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Division of Outreach and Adult Access, 1-800-621-2313 or 920-465-2480 Email: educationoutreach@uwgb.edu Website: www.uwgb.edu/educationoutreach 2 Required Reading: Hicks, T. (2013). Crafting digital writing: Composing texts across media and genres. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Course Requirements: Attendance and active participation in all activities Completion of all reading assignments Completion of in-class reaction assignments Completion of reflection journal Creation and presentation of a digital media project Development of a model lesson Evaluation and Assessment: Class Participation - Participants will be expected to actively engage in class activities and in-class reaction assignments. (20%) Reflective Journals (20%) Digital Media Projects - A variety of media projects will be modeled throughout the course. Participants will create their own products to be used in their classrooms. A presentation, video and audio project will be required. (30%) Model Lesson - Participants will be required to create a lesson integrating one or more of the digital writing modeled throughout the course. The lesson will need to address digital citizenship and appropriate use of copyright, and include how learning will be evaluated. (30%) Outline: What is digital writing and how does it play a role in my classroom? State Standards and CCSS Importance of mentor text (pedagogy) Using Captioned Media as Mentor Expository Text Authors craft, genre study, and digital writing Muddying Boundaries: Mixing Genres with Five Paragraphs Crafting web texts and presentations - copyright Crafting audio and video texts - copyright Crafting social media writing and digital identities/digital citizenship Modeling and mentoring the digital writing process http://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fsearch.ebscohost.com%2Flogin.aspx%3Fdirect%3Dtrue%26AuthType%3Dcookie%2Cip%2Ccpid%26custid%3Ds7324964%26db%3Deric%26AN%3DEJ904701%26site%3Dehost-live%26scope%3Dsite&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AFQjCNFokh4hC25Qmef_RNNGz__YVW1Upwhttp://www.google.com/url?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.csun.edu%2F%7Ebashforth%2F406_PDF%2F406_Genre%2F00Sep_EJ_MuddyingBoundaries_MixngGenresWith5Paras.pdf&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AFQjCNHHfZ8Dhf3BpsOLMSOjfbBzgckrIwUniversity of Wisconsin-Green Bay University of Wisconsin-Green Bay Division of Outreach and Adult Access, 1-800-621-2313 or 920-465-2480 Email: educationoutreach@uwgb.edu Website: www.uwgb.edu/educationoutreach 3 Wisconsin Standards for Teacher Development and Licensure: 1. Teachers know the subjects they are teaching. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines she or he teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for pupils. 2. Teachers know how children grow. The teacher understands how children with broad ranges of ability learn and provides instruction that supports their intellectual, social, and personal development. 3. Teachers understand that children learn differently. The teacher understands how pupils differ in their approaches to learning and the barriers that impede learning and can adapt instruction to meet the diverse needs of pupils, including those with disabilities and exceptionalities. 4. Teachers know how to teach. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies, including the use of technology, to encourage children 6. Teachers communicate well. The teacher uses effective verbal and nonverbal communication techniques as well as instructional media and technology to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. 7. Teachers are able to plan different kinds of lessons. The teacher organizes and plans systematic instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, pupils, the community, and curriculum goals. 8. Teachers know how to test for student progress. The teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the pupil. 9. Teachers are able to evaluate themselves. The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his or her choices and actions on pupils, parents, professionals in the learning community and others and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally. 10. Teachers are connected with other teachers and the community. The teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents, and agencies in the larger community to support pupil learning and well-being and acts with integrity, fairness and in an ethical manner. Bibliography: Dean, D. M. (2000). Muddying boundaries: Mixing genres with five paragraphs. English Journal, Sept, 53-56. Retrieved July 17, 2013, from http://www.csun.edu/~bashforth/406_PDF/406_Genre/00Sep_EJ_MuddyingBoundaries_MixngGenresWith5Paras.pdf Hicks, T. (2013). Crafting digital writing: Composing texts across media and genres. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Wolsey, T. D., & Grisham, D. L. (2012). Transforming writing instruction in the digital age: Techniques for grades 5-12. New York: The Guilford Press. November 12, 2013 - CL http://www.csun.edu/~bashforth/406_PDF/406_Genre/00Sep_EJ_MuddyingBoundaries_MixngGenresWith5Paras.pdf

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