Monday, Feb. 4, 2013

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Addison Independent newspaper

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  • ADDISON COUNTY

    INDEPENDENT Vol. 24 No. 50 Middlebury, Vermont X Monday, February 4, 2013 X 36 Pages 75

    MONDAY EDITION

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    MUHS hastwo of a kind

    $ORQJWLPH0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJHSURIHVVRUDQGDGPLQLVWUD-WRULVKHDGLQJVRXWK6HH3DJH

    Candidate exits race in Bristol

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    Byerly to lead Lafayette College

    County rivals clash on court

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    Bread and Bones band to bow out

    City settles on police station bond amount

    9DQ:\FNVROLGLHGas Addison-3 pick as &DVWLPRUHERZVRXWPLOOLRQDWDUJHWIRUQHZEXLOGLQJ

    New tool aids state police in crime fighting

    Full attentionJULIETTE HUNSDORFER, 5, of Shoreham gets a close-up look at a Lego robot being demonstrated in Middlebury Colleges Bicentennial

    Hall last Wednesday afternoon. The demonstration showcased several Lego robots that were built as part of a computer science January Term course.

    Independent photo/Trent Campbell

    By ANDY KIRKALDYVERGENNES Vergennes al-

    dermen this past Tuesday settled on a $1.85 million bond amount to re-quest from voters on Town Meeting Day to fund construction of a new North Main Street police station.That amount includes $229,000

    to buy the 0.75-acre former Ver-gennes Auto Sales parcel (a lot that is assessed by the city at $117,800), $21,000 to buy more land to the rear

    and side of the parcel, site work, construction costs for a roughly 6,000-square-foot building, and a $50,000 contingency fund.Alderman Renny Perry, a member

    of the council-appointed committee studying the new station, told alder-PHQWKDW WKHQDOQXPEHUFRXOGEHcheaper if aldermen decide to buy less of the additional land or if some or all of the contingency is not spent.

    By JOHN FLOWERSFERRISBURGH Mary Ann

    Castimore of Waltham withdrew her candidacy for the Addison-3 House vacancy on Thursday, leav-ing Warren Van Wyck of Ferris-burgh as the lone remaining nomi-nee and therefore the presumptive successor to the late Rep. Greg Clark, R-Vergennes.

    It was on Jan. 17 that Vergennes-area Republicans nominated Casti-more and Van Wyck as candidates to succeed Clark, the longtime Ad-dison-3 representative and Mount Abraham Union High School teacher who died tragically in a WUDIF DFFLGHQW RQ 5RXWH ODVWNov. 30. Both were working to set

    (See Van Wyck, Page 22)

    (See State police, Page 27)

    (See Police station, Page 26)

    Editors note: This is the second of a two-part se-ULHVRQEXUJODULHVLQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\7KHUVWSDUWin last Thursdays edition cataloged the problem of increasing home break-ins.By JOHN S. McCRIGHTADDISON COUNTY As the Vermont State

    Police battles a recent increase in residential bur-

    glaries in the northern half of Addison County, troopers are using a new methodology that uses information technology as its centerpiece.7KH'DWD'ULYHQ$SSURDFKWR&ULPHDQG7UDIF

    Safety, or DDACTS, as the process and the technol-ogy are called, takes up-to-date crime statistics and presents them on interactive maps. VSP barracks

    commanders, like Lt. Gary Genova in New Haven, use this timely and visual information to produce what they say are better strategies for combating crime and improving safety on local roads.The hope of DDACTS is to go from being re-

    active to being proactive, Genova said.

  • PAGE 2 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    The Enchanted Closet

    0DLQ6WUHHW%ULVWRO9777K)6DW

    Invites you to our 1st annualProm & Wedding Gown Event

    Sunday, February 10th 10-4pmLet us help you sell your cherished wedding and prom apparel.

    Bring in your wedding gowns, veils, prom dresses, shoes, jewelry & accessories, petticoats, mother of the bride & flower girl dresses.

    We'll find good homes for your memories.

    Let Your Gowns Out of the Closet! Eric L. DavisCorwall, VT

    Telephone number802-236-0991For all calls

    3HUVRQDODQGKRPHRIFHEffective February 4, 2013

    Fun in schoolMIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH School held its winter carni-

    val last week and hosted a variety of special events for the students and staff. Dress-up days were part of the festivi-ties and on Thursday everyone was encouraged to dress as a twin of a friend or colleague. The school also hosted a talent show on Thursday. Pictured, clockwise from above, history teacher Susan Arenson and her dress-up twin, ac-tivities director Sean Farrell, lead the parade of twins; se-nior Mark Pettit plays a drum during the talent show; senior Duncan Mathewson wows the crowd with his bagpipes; athletic trainer Sarah Johnstone and teacher Dana Poulsen march as twins; students Connor Collins and Marrott Week-es march together; and trombonists Elliott Franklin, Haven Tate and Peter Lindholm play the talent show.

    Independent photos/Trent Campbell

    CONTACT GOV. SHUMLINGovernor Peter Shumlin

    9WRQO\109 State Street, Pavillion

    Montpelier, Vermont 05609-0101www.vermont.gov/governor

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 3

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    vermontsun.com 1MHHPIFYV]:IVKIRRIW

    Whats for Lunch?

    Featuring daily lunch items from all your favorite spots around Addison County!

    www.addisonindependent.com

    Enter online for a chance to win a $10 gi! certi"cate!

    By XIAN CHIANG-WARENMONTPELIER At a pre-

    hearing conference last Wednesday, the Vermont Public Service Board pushed back on Vermont Gas Sys-tems preferred schedule for its pro-posed natural gas pipeline. The PSB told VGS that its schedule

    for the pipeline, which would bring Canadian natural gas through Addi-son County to custom-ers in Vergennes and Middlebury and also to International Paper in Ticonderoga, N.Y., was too aggressive.The pipelines route

    from Chittenden Coun-ty through Monkton has been the subject of heated dispute in re-cent weeks. Eleven Monkton res-

    idents and the towns recently enlisted law-yer, Joshua Diamond RI WKH0RQWSHOLHUUPDiamond & Robinson, attended the confer-ence.Local opposition to

    the pipeline began in Monkton in early De-cember, when it became known that VGS had changed the route the pipe-line would take through Monkton and Hinesburg. Its original proposal had the pipeline running down the VELCO electric power line corridor, but the route submitted to regulators at the Public Service Board (PSB) had it going down the public right-of-way on Pond Street and Monkton Road in Monkton, and Baldwin Road in Hinesburg. After weeks of public out-cry, VGS on Jan. 25 released a state-ment promising to move the pipeline back to the VELCO corridor.At last Wednesdays pre-confer-

    ence hearing in Montpelier, VGS proposed to move forward with its

    pipeline project according to sched-XOHGHVSLWHLWVLQWHQWLRQWROHDQRI-FLDO FKDQJHRI URXWHZLWK WKH36%by Feb. 28. Among other things VGS planned to hold a hearing on Feb. 25, schedule a site visit for the week of )HEDQGVHWWKHGHDGOLQHWROHIRUparty status by Feb. 28.The board rejected that schedule

    and asked VGS to come up with a new schedule by Feb. 8. The PSB set the date of the hearing for March 21 and the dead-line for party status to March 29. The board also in-

    formed VGS that it would not conduct a site visit until after mud season, accord-ing to Jennifer Baker, one of the 11 Monkton residents who attended the gathering.As far as controver-

    sial energy projects go, VGS pipeline wasnt HYHQUVWRQWKH36%Vagenda.(The PSB) in-

    formed Vermont Gas that their docket is in

    line behind the Vermont Yankee (nuclear power plant) relicensing hearings currently under way, which are keeping them quite busy, Baker said.Though not all residents are sat-LVHG ZLWK 9*6 DPHQGHG URXWH0RQNWRQ WRZQ RIFLDOV VHHPHGpleased with the conferences out-come.What we wanted was to push

    the schedule back, said selectboard chair John Phillips. That occurred. It will make it a lot more manage-able, because it gives us a chance to look at things and consider when or how we would want to intervene as a town.

    Pipeline set to serve city by 2015

    By ANDY KIRKALDYVERGENNES Representa-

    tives of Vermont Gas Systems Inc. told Vergennes aldermen on Jan. 29 that natural gas which they said is a cheaper form of en-ergy than oil, propane and elec-tric heat will be available to most, but not all, city residents by 2015.By then, Vermont Gas Vice

    President Tim Lyons said, the company should have its Cer-WLFDWHRI3XEOLF*RRG IURP WKHVermont Public Service Board (essentially a state permit), will have worked with Vergennes of-FLDOVWRJHWULJKWVRIZD\DORQJcity streets to run pipelines, sur-veyed residents and marketed the product to them, and built the de-livery system in Vergennes.Lyons repeated the companys

    oft-stated claim that natural gas is a cleaner, less costly fuel: He stated that it is now 43 per-

    By ANDY KIRKALDYVERGENNES At the Vergennes

    City Council meeting last Tuesday, Jan. 29, aldermen made a decision on a future police station proposal and talked with Vermont Gas Systems about its plan to bring natural gas to the city.In other business, al-

    dermen: *DYH&LW\0DQDJ-

    er Mel Hawley the au-thority to sign a Letter of Intent to buy power from a proposed so-lar array that could be installed on privately owned area land by %XUOLQJWRQUP(QFRUHRedevelopment. Hawley said the

    deal could save the city $16,000 or $17,000 a year in en-ergy costs to start with, an amount that could increase over the deals 20-year WHUP+DZOH\KDGKRSHGWRQGDVLWHon city land for a solar array, but En-FRUHRIFLDOVVDLGRQO\DVPDOOHUDUUD\was possible. A search for a suitable alternative site is ongoing, he said. +HDUGIURP$OGHUPDQ-RH.ORS-

    fenstein that the citys recreation com-mittee was moving ahead on planning

    for a toddler park that it hopes can EHEXLOWQH[WWRWKHFLW\SRRO.ORSIHQ-stein said Panton landscape architect David Raphael will help design the park, and with a design in hand a bud-

    get can be created that will allow the city to pursue grants. Such a IDFLOLW\ ZDV LGHQWLHGin a survey as some-thing residents would like to see built. :HUHWROGE\0D\-

    or Michael Daniels that the citys annual report would be dedicated to former alderman and state representative Greg Clark, who lost his life in a Nov. 30, WUDIFDFFLGHQW:HUH XSGDWHG E\

    Hawley that what was going to be a grant application for planning for a North Main Street sidewalk extension from the Agency of Transportation is now an applica-tion for funds to pay for an exten-sion. The city is seeking $100,000, to be matched by $25,000 locally, to extend the sidewalk from Vergennes Redemption to Champlain Discount Foods. Some funds will be used to study the feasibility of extending the

    Vergennes to sign deal for solar power

    PSB pushes back on Vermont Gas schedule for Monkton pipeline

    But not all homes will have access to natural gas

    cent cheaper than oil, and that the equipment used to burn it does not require annual maintenance. The Vermont Gas pipelines, he

    said, will serve the majority of the Vergennes community.However, because the delivery

    system is by pipeline, not truck, the fuel has never been available to all customers, Lyons said. According to the UPVSUHVHQWDWLRQWKHeconomics work best when Vermont Gas serves concentrations of smaller lots. A preliminary city map that Ver-

    mont Gas presented to the Public Service Board did not include, for example, the Panton Road trailer park operated by the Addi-son County Community Trust or a stretch of High Street between Comfort Hill and MacDonough Drive. City Manager Mel Hawley said

    he believed the High Street omis-sion was just a paperwork error, but thought Vermont Gas should consider extending service to the 73 homes in the trailer park.

    Some at the meeting, including one park resident and Alderwom-an Ziggy Comeau, a Panton Road resident who lives near the park, thought the company was not be-ing fair. I just feel there are people

    who are going to be discriminated against, Comeau said.Lyons said the PDS ZDV D UVWdraft, and that the company would review everything as the project pro-

    ceeded. But he made no promises. Our commitment is well go

    back and look at all these, Lyons said. But there is an economic limitation Its going to drive up the rates if we serve un-eco-nomic projects.Lyons said the company pays IRU WKH UVW IHHW RI SLSHOLQHto homes and smaller businesses, and that favorable lease deals that include no up-front costs are available for those who want to convert their existing furnaces or boilers to burn natural gas.

    What we want-ed was to push the schedule back. That oc-curred. It will make it a lot more manage-able, because it gives us a chance to look at things and consider when or how we would want to intervene as a town.

    John Phillips,selectboard chair

    CORRECTION: In our Jan. 28 article updating new programs, plans and personnel at the Bixby Memorial Library in Vergennes, the librarys new hours were incorrectly stated. Effective this month, the Bixby will be open on Monday until 7 p.m., not 8 p.m. as had been the case; on Thurs-day until 7 p.m., two hours later than

    previously; and on Saturday from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m., opening one hour earlier than previously.Also, the name of the Henry Shel-

    don Museum of Vermont History was misstated, and the Sheldon is not di-rectly involved in a Bixby project, al-though a Sheldon archivist is helping on a grant-funded Bixby effort.

    For the record

    I just feel there are people who are going to be discriminated against.

    Ziggy Cormeau

    sidewalk further to the VTrans com-PXWHUORWDQGRIFLDOVDUHDOVRWDON-LQJZLWKWKHQHZRZQHUVRI.HQQHG\Brothers about shrinking that com-plexs lengthy curb cut. +HDUG IURP +DZOH\ WKDW KH

    public works head Jim Larrow and citizen Cheryl Brinkman would serve as a new task force on city recycling. The group will be focus-ing on new recycling requirements in state laws. (VWDEOLVKHG )HE DV WKHLU

    February meeting date, rather than Feb. 12. Aldermen said scheduling FRQLFWVGURYHWKHFKDQJHEXWWKH\may have to meet on Feb. 26 if they cannot accomplish all their business on the 19th.

    Mayor Michael Daniels told aldermen that the citys annual report would be dedicated to former alderman and state representative Greg Clark, who lost his life in a Nov. 30, 2012, WUDIFDFFLGHQW

  • PAGE 4 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    EditorialADDISON INDEPENDENT

    (See Letter, Page 5)

    Periodicals Postage Paid at Middlebury, Vt. 05753

    A D D I S O N C O U N T Y

    INDEPENDENTPostmaster, send address change to Addison Independent,

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    7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

    Letters to the EditorCommon sense, action needed on nations gun laws

    Snow panelsA COATING OF wet snow breaks apart and slides down the face of the Ferrisburgh solar array along

    Route 7 Tuesday morning.Independent photo/Trent Campbell

    Newtown, Webster, Albuquerque. These are where shootings occurred just in the past month that involved assault weapons that left many dead, including some very young children. Maybe Newbury, Websterville or Albany, Vt., someday. Think about it. Hey, I thought this was only some-thing that happened elsewhere. My cousin lives in Newtown, Conn., and I have a friend in Chardon, Ohio, ZKHUHDVWXGHQWEODVWHGDZD\YHclassmates last year. Folks, it could happen anywhere!When are we going to, as a nation,

    really do something about gun vio-

    lence? Every time something like this happens we all ring our hands and la-ment it, but very little ever gets done. Banning the sale of assault weapons, ammunition clips and the number of guns owned would be a good start. Why does our governor refuse to take the lead on this issue? New Yorks governor, Andrew Cuomo, had the courage to do something. Why are RXUHOHFWHGRIFLDOVFRZHGE\WKHJXQlobby? State Sen. Phillip Beruth was going to introduce a bill in the Legis-lature to address this issue, but pulled it because he saw it going nowhere. Shame on them. Its a disgrace, it

    dishonors all those who have died or been maimed, and tells you how far we have fallen in this country.You know, when I was a kid I

    loved guns and playing guns with my friends. One group would go out into the woods to hide and the other group would count to a number and WKHQJRRXWWRQGWKHP7KHREMHFWwas to pick each other off with toy guns, saying bang, bang or some-thing. Sometimes we even used BB JXQVDQGODUJHUHFUDFNHUVZKLFKwed throw as grenades to make it seem more realistic. Later I had a

    Whos helped? Whos harmed?What seemed striking in the death with dignity debate in Montpelier this

    past week were the nuances in tone from each side: compassion to ease the suffering of loved ones was the predominant message and feeling of those who supported the legislation; a more strident argument against the moral affront the bill poses dominated the testimony of those opposed.Vermonters rightfully perplexed by complex feelings about this issue PLJKWUHHFWRQWKRVHFRXQWHULQJDUJXPHQWVWRGUDZWKHLURZQFRQFOXVLRQVThose who view the legislation as an act of compassion most often relay

    actual circumstances when a patient is in the last stages of death. Immense pain is often a factor, requiring heavy doses of morphine or other drugs that NHHSWKHSDWLHQWLQDGUXJLQGXFHGVWDWHIRUPXFKRIWKRVHQDOZHHNV:LWKfast-spreading cancers or other terminal illnesses for which doctors see no cure, the patients and their families argue that they should have a choice in GHWHUPLQLQJKRZWROLYHWKRVHQDOGD\VLQDZD\WKH\GHHPGLJQLHGIt is not a request that denies any rights to others. The proposed legislation RIIHUVDFKRLFHIRUDGLJQLHGGHDWKWRWKRVHZKRZDQWLWLWGRHVQRWPDQGDWHany prescribed process for those who dont. Opponents of the measure, on the other hand, are denying individuals who DUHIDFLQJLPPLQHQWGHDWKWKHULJKWWRFKRRVHKRZWROLYHRXWWKHLUQDOGD\VLike many who oppose extending individual rights to others, their position is that such laws would create a slippery slope of legislation gone awry, opening up the possibility for abuse and at the height of their paranoia for the state government to assume control of such decisions and dictate that choice for all. It is an argument based on unfounded fears.There have, however, been valid questions and good responses. How

    can we be sure that a prognosis is terminal? How can the law assure family members are not putting pressure on a patient to choose death over life for QDQFLDOUHDVRQV"+RZFDQZHEHVXUHWKHSDWLHQWLVRIVRXQGPLQGZKHQthat decision is made? During the past decade, the legislation has added measures to prevent abuses, including: patients would have to be diagnosed by two physicians as being terminally ill with a prognosis of death within six months; patients with depression or other mental disorders would not be eligible; all patients opting for assistance from a doctor to help end their lives would have to be enrolled in palliative care or undergo a palliative care consultation. 7KHUHLVDOVRPDQGDWHGWLPHIRUUHHFWLRQ$IWHUDSDWLHQWUHTXHVWVWRHQG

    his life or her life, the physician would have to wait at least 15 days and then JHWDUHDIUPDWLRQRIWKHSDWLHQWVZLVKWRGLHDQGWKHQRIIHUWKHSDWLHQWDchance to rescind the request. To avoid family pressures, the request by the patient has to be signed by two witnesses who are not relatives of the patient or another acting physician. Nor does the proposed legislation require doctors to participate. Any doctor

    may choose to opt out of having to make the diagnoses.In his testimony in front of the Senate Health Care and Judiciary

    Committees this past week, Attorney General Bill Sorrell said the legislation has been tweaked over the years to protect providers, the patient and the families and sets a solid foundation for patients to make informed choices. I think the right to make an informed decision about the end of your life

    when you are terminally ill and you have all of your faculties about you, the option to be able to make that choice, Sorrell said, is a simple one I think its a personal right.That doesnt mean that others who hold differing views are wrong in their

    beliefs; just that those beliefs should not infringe on the beliefs of others. It also poses this fundamental question to senators who are expected to

    face a vote within the next three weeks: What is gained by denying this choice? With their vote, who has been helped and who has been harmed?And while doctors throughout the state also have differing views, Dr.

    Diana Barnard, a palliative physician based in Middlebury, summed up her testimony to the committees succinctly: I want to do everything I can to alleviate peoples suffering and I think this bill can do that.What is the harm in that? What is the value in denying that choice to

    others? Thats what the Vermont Legislature must answer.Angelo S. Lynn

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 5

    Transportation needs hard for state to fund

    Vermonts transportation sys-tem has faced some extraordinary challenges in recent years, with four federally declared disasters LQ LQFOXGLQJ VSULQJ RRGVfollowed by Tropical Storm Irene. This year we face different trans-portation challenges both chal-lenge the Transportation Fund. One more imme-diate and another reach-ing far into the future. Long Term challenge:As Vermonters drive

    less and shift to more IXHO HIFLHQW YHKLFOHVstate revenues from gas taxes have declined steadily. Combined these state fund reduc-tions with federal un-certainties highway trust funding and federal transportation reauthori-zation reduction possi-bilities you can begin to understand Vermonts long-term transportation funding stability is seriously at risk.A summer funding study com-

    mittee worked to determine the annual gap between available state transportation revenue and the cost to meet basic transportation needs. The reported Vermont gap is esti-mated at more than $240 million per year, each and every year. The needs estimate includes the cost to preserve the states existing trans-portation system in a state of good repair. It assumes that preserving the functionality of the road net-work is fundamental to meeting basic travel needs of people and goods. It does not include major roadway expansion beyond proj-ects already in the pipeline.Short term challenge:7KH PLOOLRQ VFDO \HDU

    2014 transportation budget pre-sented by the governor assumes the Legislature is able to identify a revenue package that enables Vermont at maximize all its avail-able federal funds. Federal formula

    funds require a state dollar match. If Vermont is unable to provide its match, then federal formula funds must be returned and projects de-layed and/or suspended. The additional funding needed

    to fully fund the proposed FY2014 transportation budget program is

    $36.53 million in state funds. Without action, we place at risk our abil-ity to match all the avail-able federal transporta-tion dollars and would require cutting $123 mil-lion in projects from this coming years budget. The agency has pro-

    posed the following to achieve the immediate funding gap : )ORDW D 7,%

    (Transportation Infra-VWUXFWXUH %RQG %RQGproceeds of $9 million, after issuance costs and debt reserve, yields $8.3

    million. 'HFUHDVH FXUUHQW SHU JDOORQ

    gas tax by 4.7 cents from 19 cents to 14.3 cents per gallon. (Reduces the transportation fund by $15.32 PLOOLRQ ,QGH[SHUJDOORQJDVWD[WRLQ-DWLRQUHYHQXHQHXWUDOUVW\HDUThis action assists in a small way with the long-term structural fund-ing problems mentioned earlier. 6XVWDLQ JDV WD[ UHYHQXHV E\

    adding a 4 percent assessment on retail sales price (yields $43.56 PLOOLRQ7KLVDVVXPHVPLO-lion for each 1 percent based on $3.79/gallon price estimate.Combining all the recommended

    funding options obtains the $36.54 million needed to fully access and maximize Vermonts federal funds. They are a starting point, and the House Transportation Committee will be discussing, hearing testi-mony and evaluating all options. Editors note: Rep. Diane Lan-

    pher, Addison-3, is member of the House Transportation Committee.

    LegislativeReview

    by Rep. Diane LanpherD- Vergennes

    ULHDQGORYHGWRJRRXWWRVKRRWbottles, cans and small animals. We watched a lot of cowboys and Indians, and war movies on TV (We never had violent video games or PRYLHVOLNHWKH\KDYHQRZ1RERG\ever got hurt, though. We just needed to get it out or our system, I guess. Well I did, and I grew up! When are the Second Amendmenters going to grow up and stop playing around?Most gun owners are responsible

    people and use them for hunting or just because they love guns. I can understand the allure of guns, having been a gun owner. However, guns arent toys. They need to be treated with respect, be sure they dont end

    up in the wrong hands, arent used for the wrong things, or handled carelessly. Guns can be used to kill and they do. How about the ac-cidental shooting in Johnson, Vt., a few weeks ago that took the life of a brother while cleaning a gun!I dont know why anyone has to

    have an arsenal, when one or two guns to hunt with, or for self protec-tion are all that is needed. We allow assault weapons now, so do we want to allow machine guns, RPGs, surface-to-air missiles and cannons, too, so that they can later say, Ill give you my cannon when you pry it from my cold, dead hands? Lets get real!

    Bruce AcciavattiBristol

    Letter(Continued from Page 4)

    Letters to the EditorTime for larger discussion of U.S. role in the worldAlong with plans to gather public

    opinion on gun control, we would like to think there is some kind of momentum building for a serious discussion of violence in our world.We may be a long way from

    Joni Mitchells vision of bombers WXUQLQJLQWREXWWHULHVEXWIHZHUand fewer of us have an appetite for American military aggression. Listening to Ron Pauls farewell address, I was reminded that the electorate truly overlooked one of

    the only voices of reason in our foreign policy when we nominated Obama/Romney in 2012. Having RUGHUHGYHWLPHVDVPDQ\GURQHVWULNHVLQ3DNLVWDQDV*HRUJH%XVKour president is no Gene McCarthy but his nomination of Chuck Hagel as secretary of defense offers some hope. Following a series of military missteps (urinating on corpses, Quran burnings and nighttime DWWDFNVRQFLYLOLDQV/HRQ3DQHWWDtried to tell the press: This is not

    who we are.6KRXOGKHEHFRQUPHGDJRRG

    place for Chuck Hagel to begin would be to admit that this was who we were but now were going to do something about our actions and our image by re-examining our pur-poses. Maybe then we can reverse the tide of public skepticism of our military, which has for too long stood in violation of our trust.

    Nick ThornbladeCastleton

    Letters can be found on Pages 4, 5 and 7.

    Andrea Hubbell and Hannah Zeno, sisters from Cornwall, 9HUPRQWKDYHFRPELQHG\HDUVRIH[SHULHQFHWRRHU\RXWKHYHU\EHVWLQ6SDVHUYLFHVDWSULFHV\RXFDQDRUG

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  • PAGE 6 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    Staying within the linesA LEGO ROBOT built to draw with a marker and stay within the lines on a large sheet of paper goes

    through its motions for a crowd of onlookers in the great hall of Middlebury Colleges Bicentennial Hall ODVW:HGQHVGD\DIWHUQRRQ7KHURERWDQGVHYHUDORWKHUVZHUHWKHQDOSURMHFWVIRUVWXGHQWVLQWKH-DQX-ary Term course Lego Robot Design.

    Independent photo/Trent Campbell

    BROWN-McCLAYFUNERAL HOMESBristol

    453-2301Vergennes877-3321

    Funeral, Cremation & Memorial Services,

    Pre-Planning Services

    ObituariesADDISONCOUNTY

    Kathleen Cone, 92, Middlebury

    Suzanne Sampson, 52, Ripton

    Joyce Brousseau, 87, Middlebury

    MIDDLEBURY I. Kathleen Cone, 92, died Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013, at Helen Porter Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center in Middlebury.She was born July 25, 1920, in

    Stockbridge, the daughter of Jessie J. and Hattie Belle (Boutwell) Davis.She attended the Ranney School

    and graduated from Whitcomb High School in 1939. Following her education she worked at Cone Automatic in Windsor for a short time. She married Harold S. Cone on Jan. 1, 1942, in Bethel.After raising her daughters, she

    worked as a quality control inspector

    at Van Raalte in Middlebury. She later worked as a bookkeeper at Brush Motors in Middlebury for over 20 years. She was a member of the Congregational Church United Church of Christ in Middlebury and was a very active member of the Order of the Eastern Star, in Middlebury and later in Bristol, where she had held numerous state and local positions. Her family says she enjoyed knitting, reading and listening to music.She is survived by her daughter

    Marie Butler and husband Thomas of Woodstock, Ga.; one grandson; and four great-grandchildren.

    She was predeceased by her husband; her daughter Patricia Saulinier; a brother, Floyd Davis; and three sisters, Reita Davis, Lola Cone and Zelma Calvert.Graveside memorial services will

    be held at the Ranney Cemetery, Stockbridge, at a later date. There are no calling hours.Memorial contributions may

    be made to the American Heart Association, 20 Speen St., Framingham, MA 01701, or to the American Cancer Society, 55 Day Lane, Williston, VT 05495. Online condolences may be left at www.dayfunerals.com.

    RIPTON Suzanne Cecelia Gion Sampson, 52, passed away on Jan. 23, 2013, after a valiant struggle with cancer. She was born on Christmas Eve, 1960, in Park Ridge, Ill., the daughter of George and Suzanne (Barnes) Gion.She grew up in Winnetka, Ill.,

    attended California College of Art and graduated from Trinity College in Burlington. She worked IRU &KDPSODLQ 9DOOH\ 2IFH RIEconomic Opportunity, and was known for her genuine kindness in assisting people in need.She married Jeffrey Sampson in

    Santa Cruz, Calif., in 1983. Suzanne was an incredibly devoted wife, a proud and wonderful mother, and a loyal friend.Suzanne has always been

    described as having a special brightness to her; she was a truly loving and beautiful person: witty, playful, kind, creative, positive, passionate and down to earth. She was an accomplished textile artist and loved art of all kinds, as well as music, conversation, children, friends and nature. She took great pleasure in hiking, gardening and yoga, was an expert skier, and in her last year found special solace in swimming in the cold, clear river near her home almost every day.She is survived by Jeff, her

    loving husband and true buddy of 29 years; her wonderful loving children, daughter Bray Erin (Sampson) Judycki (and her husband Jeffrey Judycki) and son Christopher Daniel; sisters Ruth Gran, Mary Guy and Judy Gion; brothers Greg, Ron, Mark and John Gion; and her father, George Gion.She was predeceased by her dear

    Mother, Suzanne (Barnes) Gion.

    A private family service will be held in the Milwaukee area, and an additional celebration of her life will take place at Jeff and Suzannes home in Ripton later in the summer. Donations in lieu RI RZHUV FDQ EH VHQW WR$GGLVRQCounty (Vermont) Home Heath & Hospice (www.achhh.org).Suzannes family wishes to

    thank all of the truly wonder-ful people at Vermont Center for Cancer Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care, and Addison County Home Health & Hospice for the extraordinary care Suzanne received. We are very grateful for \RXUNLQGQHVV

    MIDDLEBURY Joyce Lorraine Brousseau, 87, died peace-fully at Helen Porter Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center on Jan. 30, 2013.She was born in Manchester on

    May 15, 1925. She was the daughter of Randolph and Pearl (Hall) Jones. She grew up on the farm of the former Brandon Training School where her father was the farm manager and supervisor. She graduated from Brandon High School, class of 1943, and received her R.N. from Rutland Hospital School of Nursing in 1946.Following her education she was

    employed for many years at Porter Hospital in Middlebury. Later, she assumed the role of ACSU district school nurse, eventually becom-LQJ WKH UVW IXOOWLPH VFKRRO QXUVHat Mary Hogan Elementary School, where she enjoyed her work with children until she retired in 1992, following 26 years of service. Her family says she loved playing the piano and singing, playing bridge, her boxers and her cat, Honey, little children and dessert.She is survived by her daugh-

    ter, Heidi Brousseau of Addison; a niece, Carol Adams and family of

    Middlebury; and several nieces and nephews.She was predeceased by her

    husband, Robert Brousseau, and a dear friend, Peter Grannis of Burlington.In honoring her wishes there will

    be no visiting hours or public funeral service. A private burial will take place in the spring at the family lot in Pine Hill Cemetery in Brandon.Memorial gifts may be made to

    the Harp Therapy Program at Helen Porter Health & Rehabilitation Center, c/o Nancy Durham, 30 Porter Drive, Middlebury, VT 05753.

    SUZANNE SAMPSON

    ! "Obituary GuidelinesThe Addison Independent

    considers obituaries community news and does not charge to print them, as long as they follow cer-tain guidelines. These guidelines

    are published on our web site: ad-disonindependent.com. Families may opt for unedited paid obituar-LHVZKLFK DUH GHVLJQDWHGZLWK at the end.

    To Celebrate andRemember the Life of your loved one.

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    Affordable Cremation & Burial PlansWKHRQO\RQVLWHFUHPDWRU\LQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\ORFDOO\RZQHGDQGRSHUDWHGE\:DOWHU'XFKDUPH

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 7

    Letters to the EditorWe should not pursue development of natural gas

    An article in the new Sky and Telescope says, If you dont already have an observing spot with a view very low to the west and northwest, QGRQHQRZFor Bristol that could be over the JUDYHOSLWLQEDFNRIWKHKLJKVFKRROThe reason is that a comet is com-LQJ:HPD\HYHQEHDEOHWRVHHWKLVRQHVRJHWUHDG\Comet PanSTARRS is approach-

    ing the sun where we cant see and will soon turn to go away from the VXQVRZHFDQZDWFK

    It will be closest to the sun on 0DUFKFRPLQJZLWKLQDVWURQRPLFDOXQLWVRU$8V7KDWVPLOOLRQWLPHVRU28 million miles closer than Mercury WRWKH6XQ7KLVFORVHWKH6XQVKRXOGheat it up enough so it will shed a ZRQGHUIXOWDLO%XWLWLVDQHZFRPHWDQGWKH\GRQWNQRZZKDWWRH[SHFWIn other words, look to the west

    from about March 12 to April 17 for a comet at about 10 degrees DERYHWKHWUXHKRUL]RQ7KLVPHDQVLWVKRXOGEHDERXWYHQJHUZLGWKV

    from the horizontal (true horizon QRWZKDWLVDERYHDPRXQWDLQIt should be due west on March

    12 and move to almost due north E\PLG$SULO,WZLOOEHRYHURQHAU from us, a little farther away DQGGLPPHU$IWHUPLG$SULOLWZLOOappear to go straight up and just past 3RODULVWKH1RUWK6WDUE\0D\

    Peter GrantBristol

    Editors note: If you see anything let us know so we can alert our read-ers of any good viewing spots.

    Lynn Coeby, MD, has written a letter to the editor of the Indepen-dent questioning Porter Hospitals KHDUW6KHUHSRUWVWKDWDORQJVHUYLQJYROXQWHHUZDVWHUPLQDWHGwithout cause and without recog-QLWLRQIRUPDQ\\HDUVRIVHUYLFH'U&RHE\ZDVOHIWEUHDWKOHVVDQGEHZLOGHUHGDQGRSHQO\TXHVWLRQVthe decisions and methods of the 3RUWHUDGPLQLVWUDWLRQ3RUWHULVSUHVHQWO\XQGHUUH

    for cost overruns in implementing DFRPSXWHUL]HGPHGLFDOUHFRUGThere have been recent changes in WKHDGPLQLVWUDWLYHVWUXFWXUH7KHannual People for Porter campaign has been a strong and vital re-VRXUFHLQWKHSDVW,WLVOLNHO\WKDW3RUWHUZLOOQHHGHYHQPRUHQDQ-cial and emotional support from its FLWL]HQVLQWKLVWLPHRIFULVLVI had the pleasure of being on

    the Porter medical staff for 20

    \HDUV,VHUYHGRQWKH3RUWHUERDUGIRU,KDYHEHHQDSDWLHQWDW3RUWHU,ILWLVSRVVLEOHWRORYHDKRVSLWDO,ORYHWKLVRQH)DPLO\YDOXHVDSSOLHGWRDOOUHODWLRQVKLSVthat I have observed and shared ZLWK3RUWHU7UHDWSDWLHQWVDQGFR-workers like family and things will ZRUNRXW$VZLWKDQ\IDPLO\WKHUHDUHURXJKVSRWVDQGKXUWIHHOLQJV$QGPLVWDNHVAs anyone who has visited Por-WHUNQRZVWKHUVWKHOSIXOIDFH\RXHQFRXQWHULVXVXDOO\DYROXQWHHU,Qevery trip to the hospital my spirits were buoyed by the generous JUHHWLQJVRIYROXQWHHUV7KHQHZVthat even one dedicated volunteer ORVWKHUVSRWVDGGHQVPH,DPVXUHthe Porter family will look into it DQGPDNHLWULJKW

    Patrick Stine, MDCornwall

    I was glad to see John Maddens -DQOHWWHUUHJDUGLQJQDWXUDOJDVKD]DUGV/HDNDJHIURPHYHQWXDOcorrosion and from other pipeline failures, causes many serious explo-VLRQVDQGUHV+RZHYHUWKHUHLVDORWPRUHWRWKHVWRU\Much of the corrosion problem

    results from electricity generated by PHWKDQHRZWKURXJKWKHZHOGHGKLJKVWUHQJWKVWHHOSLSHOLQHV,QDQattempt to counteract this electro-JDOYDQLFDFWLRQDUHYHUVHUHFWLHGGLUHFWFXUUHQWLVDSSOLHG7KHLQWHUPLW-tent nature, of that current, results in a similarly interrupted electromagnetic HOG(0)DVZHOODVVXUJHVRIHOHF-WULFLW\HQWHULQJFDWWOHEDUQV6HULRXVhealth impacts and greatly reduced PLONSURGXFWLRQDUHFRPPRQUHVXOWVAbating this curse for the farmer can

    EHYHU\GLIFXOWHuman health troubles also occur LQQHDUE\EXLOGLQJV7KH\DUHQRWDVreadily attributed to the source as FDWWOHLOOQHVVLV%XWWKH\DPRXQWWRone more addition to the hazardous HOHFWURPDJQHWLFVRXSZHDOOOLYHLQDWSUHVHQWPerhaps worse yet, is the severe

    climate-change potential from this OHDNDJH,WLVDODUJHIDFWRULQWKHRYHUDOOSLFWXUH,QWKHVKRUWWHUPmethane is as much as 100 times as potent a greenhouse gas as carbon GLR[LGH'XHWRHYHQWXDODWPRVSKHULFbreakdown of methane into hydrogen and CO2, it is less so in the long-WHUP+RZHYHUDV%LOO0F.LEEHQpoints out, the next 10 years are cru-FLDOLQGHDOLQJZLWKJUHHQKRXVHJDVHVIt is highly doubtful that natural

    JDVLVDQ\PRUHEHQLJQWKDQFRDO7KHpublic is becoming more aware of the skullduggery being perpetrated by big-money interests for the sake of SURW*UDVVURRWVHIIRUWVDUHLQFUHDV-LQJO\GHIHDWLQJWKHVHPDMRUSURMHFWVThis is a foolish time to invest in

    fossil fuel production or in large-scale ZLQGRUVRODUSRZHU7KLVQDWLRQFRQ-sumes a huge amount of energy by FRPSDULVRQZLWKWKHZRUOGQRUP7KHlargest bang for the buck at this time is in conservation through energy HIFLHQF\DQGLQVLPSO\FXWWLQJEDFNRQXVDJH5DWKHUWKDQGHYHORSLQJnew sources of supply to perpetuate our energy gluttony, we need a much more comprehensive effort in this GLUHFWLRQ

    Joe GleasonBridport

    GREEN MOUNTAIN GREEDVermonts landed gentry have

    concocted A CONFUSION

    Convenient for concealment of (;75(0($9$5,&(

    A Calculation contrived, FDPRXDJHGDQGFRGLHG

    )RUFLQJWKH0,6,1)250('WRPAY Property tax Surcharges for

    Funding the more Fortunates: Party pleasure, Vintage vistas, Shady lanes, Tidy white fences, Hobby farms, Heirloom barns, Pretty paddocks, Luxury livestock, Classic cars, Cement ponds and, Of course,

    6LPSDWLFR3ROLWLFRVThey Demand taxes timely paid

    with their 1HLJKERUV)/(6+DQGBLOOD!

    Delinquent payers are featured in the $QQXDO7RZQ0(18

    &RPIRUWDEOH7$;'2'*,1*',1(56 *OXWGLVFUHHWO\WKHQ%HOFKHYPOCRISY!

    Vermonts Current Abusers think Consuming Neighbors is NOT Cannibalism if:

    They use clever French recipes and sip 2OG:RUOGZLQHRUWD[IUHHBritish tea!

    Peter Szymkowicz Shoreham

    Current Use program leads to abuse

    Porter family will make things right

    The Shumlin administration SUHVHQWHGDUHSRUWRQQDQFLQJDsingle-payer health care system to WKH/HJLVODWXUHRQ-DQ,WRQFHagain demonstrates that we can pro-vide comprehensive health care to all 9HUPRQWHUVDWOHVVRYHUDOOFRVW7KLVLVWKHODVWLQDORQJOLQHRIRIFLDOreports that has come to the same FRQFOXVLRQDERXWVLQJOHSD\HUThe report shows that we will

    save $281 million dollars over the UVWWKUHH\HDUVRIDVLQJOHSD\HUV\VWHPLQ9HUPRQW$OO9HUPRQWHUVwill be covered, and this coverage will be more comprehensive than what many Vermonters are currently

    JHWWLQJRUZLOOJHWLQWKHH[FKDQJH:LWKVLQJOHSD\HUZHUHSODFHRXUpremiums with taxes, and the report shows we will be paying less than Vermonters and employers currently SD\LQSUHPLXPVELOOLRQDVRS-posed to the current amount we pay RIELOOLRQNo doubt, this report is just the VWDUW,WVKRZVXVGLIIHUHQWVRXUFHVRIrevenue for single payer, but it does not recommend a particular mix of WD[HV7KH/HJLVODWXUHZLOOQRWYRWHRQDVSHFLFSODQXQWLO%XWlets keep in mind that for decades, health insurance companies have WROGXVWKH\FDQ[RXUEURNHQKHDOWK

    FDUHV\VWHP7KH\KDGWKHLUFKDQFHDQGWKH\EOHZLW:HUHDOUHDG\SD\LQJIRUDEURNHQV\VWHP/HWVQGDIDLUZD\WRSD\IRUDV\VWHPWKDWDFWXDOO\ZRUNV

    Ellen OxfeldMiddlebury

    /HWVQGDZD\WRIXQGDKHDOWKV\VWHPWKDWZRUNV

    Approaching comet will present interesting viewing

    There is an individual seen adver-tising for the doctor-assisted suicide bill for Vermont on television stations and in the newspapers who appears to EHROGHUWKDQ\HDUVROG,URQLFDOO\the decision to kill an unborn was established after her conception, by P\HVWLPDWLRQ+DGKHUPRWKHUKDGWKHFKRLFHVKHPD\QRWEHDURXQGtoday to tout her wish to be killed by WKHPHGLFDOSURIHVVLRQLets call the choices what they

    are: abortion, killing of an unborn person, and suicide, killing of RQHVHOI7KHFKRLFHLVDFKRLFHto kill no matter how we try to soft SHGDOLW,EHJWKHTXHVWLRQVZKHUHdoes the money come from for the advertisements that are very costly? Could it be that the Hemlock Society has anything to do with it

    and do they have the same public UHODWLRQVUPZRUNLQJIRULWVFDXVHas the federation of Planned Parent-hood does?Think on these things: More

    than 55 million people are not with us because of the abortion law FKRLFHWKDWZDVEDVHGRQSUL-YDF\'RZHUHDOO\H[SHFWWKDWWKHpassing of a suicide bill will actu-ally remain a private choice? No one has the right to take anyones OLIHXQGHUPLVJXLGHGFRPSDVVLRQIf you are able to read this, dont

    leave the matter into the hands of others, get involved and make your YRLFHKHDUGDJDLQVWWKLVELOO$GYLVHyour lawmakers to do the right thing DQGYRWHWKLVELOOGRZQIRUJRRG

    Marie DionBristol

    Assisted suicide bill should die

  • PAGE 8 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    calendarcommunityTUESDAYFeb

    5 Public skating in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 9-10:30 a.m.,

    Memorial Sports Center. Exhibit opening in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Project Independence, 112 Exchange St. This exhibit highlights a years work of the Project Independence Tuesday Morning Art Group, proving youre never too old to express yourself through art. Music and refreshments and a chance to meet the artists. The art will be on exhibit through Feb. 28 at Carols Hungry Mind Caf in Middlebury.

    Figure skating in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 10:45 a.m.-noon, Memorial Sports Center.

    Adult stick & puck hockey in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 5, noon-1 p.m., Memorial Sports Center.

    Bone Builders instructors training workshop in Vergennes. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 1-4 p.m., Vergennes Residential Care Home. Free work-shop for volunteers to become instructors for the osteoporosis-prevention exercise program. Refreshments provided. No experience neces-sary. RSVP to instructor Serena Guiles at 388-7044.

    Oil sands documentary in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 7-9 p.m., Ilsley Library. Vermont Interfaith Power & Light presents Tipping Point: The Age of the Oil Sands, a look inside the extraction of oil from Canadas tar sands. A discussion will follow on the pipe-line passing through the Northeast Kingdom as well as town meeting resolutions calling for bans on tar sands oil. Info: info@vtipl.org or 388-9478.

    WEDNESDAYFeb6 Toddler TaeKwon Do in

    Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 6, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Ilsley Library.

    Instructor Kellie Thomas leads a playful intro-duction to an ancient martial art. Toddlers and preschoolers will learn basic movements to help improve their balance, focus and coordi-nation. Drop in. Info: 388-4097. Wednesdays through Feb. 13.

    Healthcare Decisions for Small Businesses

    in 2013 presentation in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 6, noon-1:30 p.m., Ilsley Library. The Addison County Chamber of Commerce presents a discussion of the changes coming to the small business health insurance market in 2013 and 2014. Small business owners will get help weighing whether to stop offering health insurance or start offer-LQJ LW WKURXJK9HUPRQWVRQOLQH+HDOWK%HQHWExchange. Info: 388-4095 or 388-7951.

    Youth media lab in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 6, 3:30-4:30 p.m., Ilsley Library. Kids in grades 3 and up are invited to join library and MCTV staff to make movies and learn about technology using MCTVs state-of-the-art media stations. Every Wednesday. Space is limited; pre-register at the childrens desk, by calling 388-4097, or by emailing sarah.lawton@ilsleypubliclibrary.org.

    Addison County Farm-to-School Salon in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 6, 5-8 p.m., Middlebury Union High School Alternative Education building. The Addison County Relocalization Network invites everyone to join the conversation about getting the commu-nity more involved with local farm-to-school programs. Bring questions, ideas and resources, and a potluck dish to share. Space is limited: RSVP early to lea@acornvt.org or 382-0401.

    Who Were Our Worst Presidents? presenta-tion in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 6, 7-9 p.m., Ilsley Library. UVM History Professor Emeritus Mark A. Stoler discusses how presi-dential ratings have changed over time, and the grounds used to evaluate presidential perfor-mance. A Vermont Humanities Council First Wednesday event. Info: 388-4095.

    THURSDAYFeb7 Book fair in Weybridge. Thursday,

    Feb. 7, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Weybridge Elementary School. Annual book fair

    featuring a wide variety of high-quality used FWLRQDQGQRQFWLRQIRUDGXOWVDQGFKLOGUHQ7REHQHW WKHVFKRRO OLEUDU\'RQDWHGERRNVFDQbe dropped off at the school, or call Mary at 545-2172 for pickup. Continues Feb. 8.

    Public skating in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 7, 9-10:30 a.m., Memorial Sports Center.

    Early Literacy Story Time in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 7, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Ilsley Library. Join childrens librarian Sarah Lawton for stories, rhymes and songs that help young children develop early literacy skills. Drop in. Every Monday and Thursday through Feb. 14.

    Hannaford Career Center Open House in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 7, 4-7 p.m., HCC campuses, 51 Charles Ave. Learn about the wide variety of educational programs offered, from agribusiness technology and construc-tion to video tech and health careers and many more. Info: www.hannafordcareercenter.org or 382-1012.

    Community Crime Forum in Addison. Thursday, Feb. 7, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Addison Central School. Addison residents are invited to an open discus-sion about crime in the town of Addison. The group will brainstorm ideas on how to help law enforcement and themselves to be more aware, and determine if there is potential to start a neighborhood watch program.

    Twist O Wool Spinning Guild meeting in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 7, 7-9 p.m., American Legion. Kari Chapin, author of Handmade Marketplace and Grow Your Handmade Business will speak. All are welcome. Info: 453-5960.

    Jonathan Lorentz Trio in Brandon. Thursday, Feb. 7, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Brandon Music. Lorentz plays jazz saxophone, with John Hunter on bass and Tim Gilmore on drums. General admission $15; reservations are encouraged. Venue is BYOB. Reservations at (802) 465-4071.

    Money Smart Child parent workshop in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 7, 7:30-9 p.m., Ilsley Library. A free workshop to help parents WHDFKWKHLUFKLOGUHQDERXWQDQFHV6LJQXSE\Jan. 29 at 388-4097 or sarah.lawton@ilsleypub-liclibrary.org. Free pizza and childcare provided.

    FRIDAYFeb8 Book fair in Weybridge. Friday,

    Feb. 8, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Weybridge Elementary School. Annual book fair

    featuring a wide variety of high-quality used FWLRQDQGQRQFWLRQIRUDGXOWVDQGFKLOGUHQ7REHQHW WKH VFKRRO OLEUDU\ 'RQDWHG ERRNV FDQbe dropped off at the school, or call Mary at 545-2172 for pickup.

    Senior luncheon in Bristol. Friday, Feb. 8, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Marys at Baldwin Creek. CVAA sponsors a luncheon featuring Chef Doug Macks talents. Mixed winter greens salad with pears and bleu cheese, fresh baked roll, baked cod with lemon tarragon butter, rice and vege-table, and chocolate cake with chocolate icing. Suggested donation $5. Reservations required: 1-800-642-5119.

    Lunchtime public skating in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 8, noon-1 p.m., Memorial Sports Center.

    All-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner in Weybridge. Friday, Feb. 8, 5-8 p.m., Weybridge Elementary School. Spaghetti and meatballs, green salad, garlic bread, homemade desserts and bever-age. Proceeds go toward the Weybridge Volunteer Fire Department. Adults $8, children 6-12 $5, under 6 free. Tickets available at the WRZQFOHUNVRIFHRUDWWKHGRRU

    Exhibit opening reception in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 8, 5-7 p.m., Vermont Folklife Center. Celebrating the opening of Parallels, a photo-documentary by Libby Hillhouse of Ryegate, pairing photographic portraits and text drawn from interviews. The exhibit looks into the lives of low-income Vermonters. On exhibit Feb. 8-March 30. Info: 388-4964.

    SATURDAYFeb9 Yarn-making class in Orwell.

    Saturday, Feb. 9, 9-11 a.m., Orwell )UHH /LEUDU\ 3URIHVVLRQDO EHU DUWLVW

    Jeanie Roberts demonstrates the process of WXUQLQJEHUULJKWRIIWKHDQLPDOLQWR\DUQRIIWKHspinning wheel. Attendees can take a turn at the carder or try drop-spindling.

    Relay for Life kickoff in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 9, 10 a.m.-noon, Ilsley Library. The American Cancer Society welcomes team captains and team participants to the 2013 Relay season, highlighting event details and offering fundraising tips. Info: (802) 872-6307 or Donna.decatur@cancer.org.

    Exhibit opening reception in Bristol. Saturday, Feb. 9, 5:30-7:30 p.m., WalkOver Gallery. Celebrating the opening of Intersection: Presence, Creativity, Dreams, an exhibit by members of North of Eden, Archetypal Dreamwork. Live music and poetry at 6:30 p.m. Exhibit runs Feb. 5-28.

    Hot stuffPETE SUTHERLAND AND Cassandra Corcoran pose as red-hot chili peppers dur-

    ing the 2011 Monkton Chili Cook-off, sponsored by the Monkton Community Coffee-house. This years cook-off, being held as a social rather than as a judged competi-tion, will take place Saturday, Feb. 9, at 6 p.m. at the Monkton Firehouse.

    Rock of agesEDWARD BURTYNSKYS CHROMOGENIC print, Rock of Ages #19, Granite Sec-

    tion, Rock of Ages Quarry, Barre, Vermont, 1991 is part of a new exhibit, Nature Transformed: Edward Burtynskys Vermont Quarry Photographs in Context, at the Middlebury College Museum of Art. An opening lecture is on Tuesday, Feb. 13, at 4:30 p.m. in the Mahaney Center for the Arts.

    Photograph courtesy Howard Greenberg & Bryce Wolkowitz, New York/Nicholas Metivier, Toronto

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 9

    calendarcommunityFourth annual Chili Cook-off in Monkton. Saturday, Feb. 9, 6-7:30 p.m., Monkton Firehouse. This year, instead of restaurant judging, the Chili Cook-off will be held as a local social. Bring in enough chili to feed four people. No electrical outlets available. 6XJJHVWHG GRQDWLRQ LQFOXGHV UDIHentry (four winners of $25 each). The host, the Monkton Community Coffeehouse, will provide the tableware and drinks. Proceeds will help the Coffeehouse bring Front Porch Forum to Monkton.

    %HQHWFRQFHUWDQGPDSOHGHVVHUWFRQWHVWLQ6KRUHKDP Saturday, Feb. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Platt Memorial Library. Music will be performed by the Addison County folk quartet Zephyr. Maple dessert contest and tasting. Tasters can vote for their favorites with cash donations. Dessert entries must be made with Vermont maple syrup and be submitted with a recipe card. Info: 897-2647 or platt@shoreham.net.

    $QQHPLHNH-HUHPLDKLQFRQFHUWLQ%UDQGRQ Saturday, Feb. 9, 7-9 p.m., Brandon Music. The classical piano and accordion duo play music by composers from Europe and South America. General admission $15; reservations encouraged. (802) 465-4071.

    &RQWUD GDQFH LQ &RUQZDOO Saturday, Feb. 9, 7-9:30 p.m., Cornwall Town Hall. Rachel Nevitt calling, with live music by Red Dog Riley. Cost $5 per person, $20 maximum per family. Info: 462-3722.

    Mardi Gras Casino Night in Bristol. Saturday, Feb. 9, 7-9 p.m., St. Ambrose Church. Tickets $20 per person, including $150 in gaming chips. Everyone has a great chance to win prizes. Appetizers and refreshments available. Info: 453-5599.

    %UHDGDQG%RQHVIDUHZHOOFRQFHUWLQ/LQFROQ Saturday, Feb. 9, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Burnham Hall. The Burnham Music Series welcomes Bread and Bones in its last concert before the trios members go on to pursue other musical interests. Richard Ruane on vocals, guitar, mandolin and ukulele; Beth Duquette on vocals; and Mitch Barron on fretless, fretted and upright bass and vocals. Info: 388-9782.

    Panton Flats EP release party in Vergennes. Saturday, Feb. 9, 8-10 p.m., Vergennes Opera House. This Mardi Gras-themed affair will feature amazing music, cash bar by the $QWLGRWH D UDIH RI RULJLQDO DOEXP FRYHUDUW FRQFHVVLRQV DQGPRUH +DOI RI WKH UDIHSURFHHGVZLOOEHQHWWKH6FKOHLQIDPLO\RI1HZ+DYHQZKRUHFHQWO\ORVWWKHLUKRXVHLQDUHTickets $10 in advance, $15 at the door, avail-able at Classic Stitching or the VOH, www.vergennesoperahouse.org or 877-6737.

    6ZHHWKHDUWV %DOO LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ Saturday, Feb. 9, 8 p.m.-midnight, Middlebury American Legion. The Orwell Fire Departments 50th annual Sweethearts Ball, with dance music

    provided by Triple B Mobile DJ. Tickets $15 per couple, $8 per person, available at Hawks Country Kitchen, Orwell Gas n Go, Buxtons *HQHUDO6WRUHIURPDQ\2UZHOOUHJKWHURUDWthe door.

    SUNDAYFeb10 *0& VQRZVKRH RQ %XFN

    0RXQWDLQ LQ :DOWKDP Sunday, Feb. 10, meeting time and place TBA.

    Two-mile round trip trek with moderately steep ascents; views of Champlain Valley and Snake 0RXQWDLQ &RQWDFW OHDGHU 5XWK 3HQHOG IRUmeeting time and place: 388-5407.

    St. Peters Parish breakfast in Vergennes. Sunday, Feb. 10, 8-10 a.m., St. Peters Parish Hall. Eggs, hotcakes, French toast, bacon, sausage and more. Adults $8, seniors and NLGVNLGVXQGHUIUHHIDPLOLHVRIYHRUPRUHUDIHGUDZLQJVIRUD IUHHbreakfast, and bottle drive; dont forget to bring your bottles to support the Youth Ministry.

    (FR6SLULW$ZDUGSUHVHQWDWLRQLQ0LGGOHEXU\ Sunday, Feb. 10, 4-6 p.m., Ilsley Library. This years Eco-Spirit Award will be presented to Dan Shea. Slide show and drum circle; all are invited to bring a drum and participate.

    )UHH \RJDPHGLWDWLRQ LQ0LGGOHEXU\ Sunday, Feb. 10, 4-6 p.m., Otter Creek Yoga in the Marble Works. Monthly community gathering

    with gentle yoga, meditation and reading the Five Mindfulness Trainings of Thich Nhat Hanh. Beginners welcome. Info: 388-1961. No charge but donations are accepted.

    MONDAYFeb11 /HJLVODWLYH EUHDNIDVW LQ %ULVWRO

    Monday, Feb. 11, 7-8:45 a.m., Bristol American Legion. Breakfast at 7 a.m.,

    program 7:30-8:45. (DUO\ /LWHUDF\ 6WRU\ 7LPH LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ Monday, Feb. 11, 10:30-11:15 a.m., Ilsley Library. Join childrens librarian Sarah Lawton for stories, rhymes and songs that help young children develop early literacy skills. Drop in. Every Monday and Thursday through Feb. 14.

    (FNDQNDUSUHVHQWDWLRQLQ0LGGOHEXU\ Monday, Feb. 11, 6-7 p.m., Ilsley Library. Eckankar of Vermont sponsors this open discussion for people of all faiths: Have you ever seen an inner light or had strong intuitions, dreams of \LQJSDVWOLIHUHFDOORUDQRXWRIERG\H[SHUL-ence? Come share your story. Info: soyarn@aol.com.

    $GGLVRQ &RXQW\ 5LJKW WR /LIH PHHWLQJ LQMiddlebury. Monday, Feb. 11, 7-8 p.m., St. Marys Parish Hall. Visitors welcome. Info: 388-2898 or L2Paquette@aol.com.

    %RRNFOXEPHHWLQJ LQ%ULGSRUW Monday, Feb. 11, 7-8 p.m., Carl Norton Highway Department

    conference room. Discussing Mystic River by Dennis Lehane. Marchs title: Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich. Info: 758-2858.

    TUESDAYFeb12 3XEOLF VNDWLQJ LQ 0LGGOHEXU\

    Tuesday, Feb. 12, 9-10:30 a.m., Memorial Sports Center.

    Figure skating in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 12, 10:45 a.m.-noon, Memorial Sports Center.

    $GXOW VWLFN SXFN KRFNH\ LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ Tuesday, Feb. 12, noon-1 p.m., Memorial Sports Center.

    $UW H[KLELW RSHQLQJ OHFWXUH DW 0LGGOHEXU\College. Tuesday, Feb. 12, 4:30-6 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts. Juliette Bianco of Dartmouth and Pieter Broucke, Middlebury College professor of history of art and archi-tecture, present Nature Transformed, in which they discuss Edward Burtynskys career and the process of organizing the Nature Transformed exhibit. Free. Info: www.middle-bury.edu/arts or 443-3168.

    +RPH (QHUJ\ 6DYLQJ :RUNVKRS LQ %ULVWRO Tuesday, Feb. 12, 7-9 p.m., Howden Hall. Learn to identify and prevent heat loss in your KRPHDQGLPSURYHLWVWKHUPDOHIFLHQF\/HDUQabout energy audits and rebates up to $2,000 IURP(IFLHQF\9HUPRQW(QWHUWRZLQDKRPHenergy saving kit.

    LIVEMUSIC%UHQW 7KRPDV 4XDUWHW LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ Thursday, Feb. 7, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main.

    7KH 8NH7RQHV LQ %ULVWRO Friday, Feb. 8, 6-8 p.m., Recycled Reading of Vermont, 25A Main St.

    %RE 0DFNHQ]LH %DQG LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ Friday, Feb. 8, 9 p.m.-midnight, 51 Main.

    %RE*DJQRQ7ULRLQ0LGGOHEXU\ Saturday, Feb. 9, 9 p.m.-midnight, 51 Main.

    /RQJIRUG5RZLQ0LGGOHEXU\ Friday, Feb. 15, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Two Brothers Tavern.

    *XPER

  • PAGE 10 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    Bread and Bones will be perform-ing their very last show when they play at the Burnham Music Series, Burnham Hall, in Lincoln on Satur-day, at 7:30 p.m. After performing together for more than a decade, they are amicably parting ways to pursue other musical interests. 7KLVWULRKDVEHHQD[WXUHLQWKH

    Vermont acoustic music scene and beyond, known for strong original material with two- and three-part harmonies over solid and creative guitar and bass work. Bread and Bones is Richard Ruane from Rip-ton on vocals, guitar, mandolin and ukulele; Beth Duquette from Lin-coln on vocals and Mitch Barron

    from Hinesburg on fretless, fretted and upright bass and vocals. Ruane has been the primary

    songwriter of the group. The band formed to support his 2001 solo CD, Things That Strangers Say and started out as Richard Ruane and Friends. After playing many shows all over the region, the band evolved into an identity of its own and took on the name Bread and Bones.Their two CDs are

    I Know Stories and Could Have Been a Dream. The former CD was named 2008s Vermonts Tra-ditional Album of the Year by the Times-Argus.Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for

    seniors and teens and $3 for chil-dren. For more information, call 388-6863.PANTON FLATS AT VOH

    Local super-group Panton Flats will celebrate the release of their self-titled EP at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 9, with a party at the Vergennes Opera House. This Mardi Gras-themed affair

    will feature amazing music, along with a cash bar by The Anti-GRWH UDIH RI RULJLQDOalbum cover art and autographed promo-tional items, delicious concessions and more. +DOI RI WKH UDIH SUR-FHHGVZLOOJRWREHQHWthe Schlein family of

    New Haven who recently lost their KRXVHLQDUHBorn out of an impromptu jam

    session that took place in 2009 at D EHQHW FRQFHUW DW WKH9HUJHQQHVOpera House, Panton Flats is a whos who of musical talent fea-turing Josh Brooks on guitar, har-

    Trio bids farewell with lovely harmonies

    Fli:cXjj\j]`kpflijZ_\[lc\

    :cXjj\j]i\\kfXccd\dY\ijPf^X#9f[pGldg#Jg`e#G`cXk\j#;XeZ\#QldYX#8hlXXe[dfi\F]]\i\[k_ifl^_flkk_\[Xp

    vermontsun.com 1MHHPIFYV]:IVKIRRIW

    Be sure to check outthe flyers in our paper this week!

    Great information from:3QVVMa,Z]O[

    monica and vocals; Chris Myers on drums; Bob Levinson on guitar and vocals; Andy Smith on bass; and Chris Wyckoff on piano, organ and vocals. Although Panton Flats has been playing locally in Vermont for several years, it is this self-titled (3WKDWWUXO\GHQHVWKHEDQG7KHalbum will be available for sale on CD at the party. Tickets are $10 in advance, $15

    at the door, and are available at the Opera House, Classic Stitching in Vergennes or vergennesoperahouse.org. For more information contact the Opera House at 877-6737 or info@vergennesoperahouse.org.DUO IN BRANDONBrandon Music, at 62 Country

    Club Road in Brandon, presents the classical piano and accordion duo, Annemieke & Jeremiah, on Satur-day, at 7 p.m. Dutch classical piano virtuoso Annemieke Spoelstra and Vermont master accordionist Jer-emiah McLane join forces for an evening of music by composers from Europe and South America. Playing unique arrangements

    based on traditional folk melodies from the 17th to the 21st centuries, the duo is drawn to characteristic rhythms of dances found through-out Europe and South America. They perform compositions by As-WRU3LD]]ROOD$QWRQtQ'YRiNDQGBla Bartk, as well as their own original pieces.Spoelstra, who lives in Burl-

    ington, has performed all over the world and is frequently asked as a collaborative artist, to participate in conservatories and national and international competitions for dif-ferent instruments and voices. McLane, who lives in Sharon, has taught and performed throughout the United States and Europe.General admission is $15 and res-

    ervations are encouraged. A dinner and show package is available for $30. Venue is BYOB. For reserva-tions call Brandon Music at (802) 465-4071.JONATHAN LORENTZ TRIOAs part of their jazz series, Bran-

    don Music, located at 62 Country

    Club Road in Brandon, will present WKH VD[RSKRQLVW -RQDWKDQ /RUHQW]on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Lorentz will perform with bassist John Hunter and drummer Tim Gilmore.Lorentz plays with a sound that

    is warm in tone and rich in melodic FRPSOH[LW\+HLVDGDULQJDQGFUH-ative improviser who blends mod-ern jazz with blues, rock, and the avant-garde. Lorentzs recent al-bum, Borderlands, was released to critical acclaim in 2010, and is receiving airplay on radio stations throughout the world. In March of 2011 Fanfare magazines Lynn Ren Bayley remarked that Jona-than Lorentz has really got it: a JUHDW VW\OH DQ H[SORUDWLYH PLQGand a concept for this album that goes beyond the usual fare you hear IURPMD]]VD[WULRVGeneral admission is $15 and res-

    ervations are encouraged. A dinner and show package is available for $30. Venue is BYOB. For reserva-tions call Brandon Music at 465-4071.NEW COLLEGE EXHIBITS7ZRQHZDUWH[KLELWVRSHQDWWKH

    Middlebury College Museum of $UW RQ )ULGD\ 7KH UVW 1DWXUHTransformed: Edward Burtynskys Vermont Quarry Photographs in &RQWH[W LV LQ WKH &KULVWLDQ $Johnson Memorial Gallery. Bur-tynskys iconic photographs of the TXDUULHV RI 9HUPRQW DUH H[SORUHGZLWKLQ WKH FRQWH[W RI WKH JHRORJL-cal and social history of the area, including in particular the Italian immigrant stoneworkers in the granite quarries near Barre. The H[KLELW ZKLFK UXQV WKURXJK$SULO22, is free.7KH VHFRQG H[KLELW /LQHDU

    Thinking: Sol LeWitt, Modern, Postmodern, and Contemporary Art from the Collection, will be in the Overbrook Gallery. Students in the course Minimalism: Art, Objects, DQG ([SHULHQFH ZLOO LQVWDOO D 6ROLeWitt wall drawing, courtesy of the LeWitt Estate. Throughout the term, the museum will mount on-going complementary installations

    arts beat

    BY GREG PAHL(See Arts Beat, Page 11)

    BREAD AND BONES

    ANNEMIEKE & JEREMIAH

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 11

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    Cosmic ForecastFor the week of February 4

    AQUARIUS: January 21-February 18 If you want to broaden your horizons you will have to explore beyond your comfort zone. It may not always be comfortable, but it can be adventurous. PISCES: February

    19-March 20 You have many questions, but not enough answers are com-ing your way. Delve a little deeper this week.ARIES: March 21-April

    20 Patience and calm is the way out of a tricky situa-tion. You also may want to keep your opinions to your-self until everything gets settled, which shouldnt take long.TAURUS: April 21-

    May 21 Though you may be pinching pennies, that doesnt mean you can-not make a purchase that ZLOO EHQHW WKH KRXVHKROGMake a budget so youll learn how to spend wisely.GEMINI: May 22-June

    21 You may need to sub-scribe to a new way of thinking. The way you have been doing things lately is not working out too well. Ask a family member for advice.CANCER: June 22-July

    22 It can be easy to get into a routine and then in a rut. Try switching up just one thing from your daily tasks, and it could provide a breath of fresh air. LEO: July 23-August

    23 Take advantage of the many opportunities for you to meet new people and forge new friendships this week. You may just meet someone who changes your life.VIRGO: August 24-Sep-

    tember 22 Too much of a good thing can make it GLIFXOWWRIRFXVRQRWKHUWDVNVDQGUHVSRQVLELOLWLHV

    0DNH WKH HIIRUW WR VWD\ IRFXVHG VR \RX GRQW QGyourself falling behind.LIBRA: September 23-October 23 You will likely

    QG\RXUVHOILQDGRPHVWLFgroove over the next few days. Use the time to get creative in the kitchen, straighten up the abode and do some decorating.SCORPIO: October

    24-November 22 Dont al-low your emotions to get the best of you during a disagreement this week. Be sure to gather all of the facts before you form an opinion. SAGITTARIUS: No-

    vember 23-December 21 This is the perfect week to correct any wrong impres-sions you might have made. Be overly generous with all the people you meet.CAPRICORN: Decem-

    ber 22-January 20 Speak up if you dont like the way something is being done. Change cant hap-pen if you dont voice your opinion, so overcome your reservations.

    FAMOUSBIRTHDAYSJANUARY 20Gary Barlow,Singer (42)JANUARY 21Geena Davis,Actress (57)JANUARY 22Steve Perry, Singer (64)JANUARY 23Doutzen Kroes,Model (28)JANUARY 24Neil Diamond,Singer (72)JANUARY 25Patrick Willis, Athlete

    (28)JANUARY 26Ellen Degeneres, TV host (55)

    from the permanent collection. The exhibit, which runs through May 5, is free.The museum is located off South

    Main Street in Middlebury. For ad-ditional information, call 443-5007.GYPSIES IN ROCHESTERThe White River Valley Play-

    ers will present a concert by They Might Be Gypsies, the father-and-son duo of Greg and Aidan Ryan, Friday, at 8 p.m. at the Rochester School auditorium on Route 100 in Rochester.Inspired by the 1930s Gypsy Jazz

    of Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli and contemporary gypsy masters as well, the Ryans play high-energy, uplifting music with tremendous passion. The Ryans write some of the pieces they play, but others go back to the 1930s, or are from contemporary gypsy mas-ters.)RONVLQJHU VRQJZULWHU DQG G-

    dler Rani Arbo described the duo DV6LPXOWDQHRXVO\FRRODQGRQUH with an ease and joy that lets the rest of us sit back, gape, and grin.General admission tickets are $8

    and will be sold at the door.LIVE MUSIC AT 51 MAINThe Brent Thomas Quartet will

    perform at 51 Main in Middlebury beginning at 8 p.m. on Thursday. The quartet features jazz musicians from the greater Burlington area playing jazz standards with tradi-tional and modern interpretations.On Friday, the Bob Mackenzie

    Band takes to the stage, at 9 p.m. The band offers a solid selection of blues classics, jump, swing and rhythm & blues.Finally, at 9 p.m. on Saturday, the

    Bob Gagnon Trio will perform. Led

    by Vermont-born jazz guitarist Bob Gagnon, this trio plays funky jazz inspired by Max Roach, Charlie Parker, Django Reinhardt and Ah-mad Jamal.All ages, no cover. For additional

    information visit www.go51main.com or phone 388-8209.SENIOR ART EXHIBITA new art exhibit opens on Tues-

    day at Project Independence, 112 Exchange St., in Middlebury. The opening reception runs from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. with music and refresh-ments and a chance to meet the art-ists. Everyone is welcome.The show features the art high-

    lights of a years work by the Proj-ect Independence Tuesday Morn-ing Art Group that meets weekly. Though a few of the participants have done art all their lives, many never have or have ever viewed themselves as artists until seeing their art on the wall. Experimenting with different media and materi-als, participants of the group show that youre never too old to express yourself through art. The art show, which runs through

    Feb. 28, is free.DOWNTOWN MUSIC SERIESFinally, The Downtown Music

    Series continues at 6 p.m. on Fri-day with the Uke Tones at Recycled Reading of Vermont, 25A Main St. in Bristol (next to Art on Main). Jim and Jennifer Vyhnak will provide a fun evening of Old Timey music on ukulele. Singing along is encour-aged and you just may be inspired to try out some uke playing of your own. Its free and the public is wel-

    come. For more information call 453-5982 or visit recycledreadin-gofvt.com.

    Arts Beat(Continued from Page 10)

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    Addison Independent Puzzles

    SudokuEach Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium DQGGLIFXOW

    Level: Medium.

    This weeks puzzle is rated

    This weeks puzzle solutionscan be found on Page 35.

    Hard

    5 43 9 1 6

    7 3 19 7 8 2 3 1

    6 1 7 4 2 96 5 7

    1 5 4 68 9

    Across1. Wet nurses, overseas6. Auction actions10. Agenda14. Japanese-American15. Brown family member16. Comme ci, comme ca17. ___ live one18. Knock for a loop19. Blood-related20. Have many secrets23. Arrives at24. Belief25. Whalebone29. ___ show time!30. Baby carrier?33. Favorite34. Spot remover?37. Colonels insignia39. Ambiguous expressions42. Preserved, in a way43. Wheedle44. Chapter 11 issue45. May I help you?46. Symbol of strength48. Social strata50. Natl. Humor Month51. Look53. Looks twice61. Fine things62. Taro variety63. Send on64. Authority65. Norse goddess of fate66. Quibbles67. Knock off68. Cheese ___69. Play too broadly

    Down1. Word with phase or retention2. Entangle3. Like some salts4. Principal5. Fodder6. Stupefy7. Sudden attack8. Cudgel9. Illuminated, in a way10. Hymn11. Trickster of myth12. Yeah, right!13. All alternative21. Packed22. City near Oberhausen25. Fussbudget26. Revere27. Vuitton28. Hamburgs river29. Itty bit30. Cousin of a bittern

    31. Church property32. Exploits35. Darn it!36. Peace Piece artist38. Contributes40. Antiparkinsonian agent41. Surpass47. Eager49. Punish with an arbitrary penalty50. Test, as ore51. Indian caste52. Key material53. Blocks54. Viva-voce55. Vulcans Chimney56. Emanation57. Bulls or Bears58. Big top?59. Set aside60. Gaels tongue

    Two-TimersBy Myles Mellor and Sally York

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

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    17 18 19

    20 21 22

    23 24

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    33 34 35 36 37 38

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    FERRISBURGH Lake Cham-plain Maritime Museums Maritime Research Institute is exploring an ex-citing new way to study historic shipwrecks and to share them with the pub-lic. Vermont Public Tele-vision on Sunday, Feb. 3, aired an on-water tour and interview with LCMM Executive Co-Director Adam Kane on the show Out and About. The Maritime Mu-

    seums archaeological dive team visited a Lake Champlain shipwreck to test new mechanical scanning sonar technol-ogy supplied by Teledyne BlueView of Seattle, Wash. The operation took place during the sum-mer of 2012, thanks to a grant from the National Center for Preserva-tion Training and Technology of the National Park Service, and the VPT crew followed up with a visit to the Museums Maritime Research Insti-tute in January.

    The Teledyne BlueView BV 5000-2250 is a tripod-mounted device that takes millions of individual sonar

    readings and displays the results as a three-dimen-sional (3D) point cloud. Lake Champlain Mari-time Museum used this technology to make a de-tailed examination of the Sloop Island Canal Boat which sank off Charlotte GXULQJWKHUVWTXDUWHURIthe 20th century. 8VLQJ HTXLSPHQW

    supplied by Teledyne BlueView, LCMM ar-chaeologists deployed the BlueView to more than 40 locations around, on and within the wreck site. At each of these po-sitions the sonar was able

    to capture accurate 3D images of the shipwreck, which were then assem-bled into a detailed 3D model of the entire wreck. This composite image, consisting of 35 million data points, allows the remains of the Sloop Is-land Canal Boat to be examined in a

    completely innovative way.Detailed archaeological drawings

    of the shipwreck site were originally created by LCMM archaeologists after more than 300 dives in 2002 and 2003, employing traditional PDQXDO GRFXPHQWDWLRQ WHFKQLTXHVIn contrast, data gathering with the new technology in 2012 took only three days. This new technology of-IHUV WKH DELOLW\ WR HIFLHQWO\ UHFRUGsubmerged cultural resources in great detail in only a fraction of the time it would take for archaeologists to document them using traditional UHFRUGLQJ WHFKQLTXHV RI PHDVXULQJand drawing.Maritime Museum archaeolo-

    gists will continue post-processing the newly captured data and mak-ing comparisons with their original QGLQJV WKLV ZLQWHU 7KH PXVHXPplans to exhibit images captured by this technology in their Nauti-cal Archaeology Center during the 2013 season. The museum will also produce a manual outlining best practices for the use of this technol-ogy by other archaeologists in the spring of 2013.

    THE BLUEVIEW MECHANICAL scanning sonar is deployed from LCMMs research vessel to map in 3D a Lake Champlain wreck.

    LCMM tests new shipwreck viewing tool

    This composite image, consisting of 35 million data points, allows the remains of the Sloop Island Canal Boat to be examined in a completely innovative way.

    MIDDLEBURY Anyone who has ever been involved in community theater will identify strongly with the maxim If anything can go wrong it will. Thats exactly what happens in the comedy Play On! which will be presented by the Middlebury Com-munity Players at Town Hall Theater on Feb. 14-17.Dora Greven directs this uproari-

    ous play within a play. A theater group is trying desperately to put on a play in spite of maddening interfer-ence from the haughty authoress who keeps revising the script. Act I is a rehearsal of the dreadful show, Act II is the near disastrous dress rehearsal, DQGWKHQDODFWLVWKHDFWXDOSHUIRU-mance in which anything that can go wrong does.When the authoress decides to give

    a speech on the state of the modern

    theater during the curtain calls, the audience is treated to a madcap cli-max of the thoroughly hilarious romp. Even the sound effects reap their share of laughter.Included in the cast are Kevin Com-

    mins, Kendra Gratton, Raymond Johnston, Megan Kelley, Ark Lemal, Mike Lynch, Tom Noble, Robynn Stanley, Kathleen Walls and Matt White.Shows are Thursday-Saturday, Feb.

    14-16, at 8 p.m., with a Sunday mati-nee on Feb. 17 at 2 p.m. The Sunday matinee will have American Sign Lan-guage interpretation. Tickets are $17, available at the Town Hall Theater %R[ 2IFH 0RQGD\6DWXUGD\ QRRQto 5 p.m., 802-382-9222, or online anytime at www.townhalltheater.orgFor more information visit www.

    middleburycommunityplayers.org.

    Middlebury Community Playersto present Play on! Feb. 14-17

    A special thanks to Middlebury Fitness for allowing the Health Department use of their space for this event!

  • PAGE 14 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

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    Hey, wait a minuteMIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH School students Jasper Christensen, left, and Eric Shambo get a laugh

    from the schools athletic director, Sean Farrell, after a school assembly last Thursday morning.Independent photo/Trent Campbell

    By XIAN CHIANG-WARENBRISTOL The number of

    candidates running for the Bristol selectboard dwindled to two last week. Bristol Planning Commis-sion member Kris Perlee withdrew his petition for his candidacy on the VHOHFWERDUGEHIRUHWKHEDOORWZDV-nalized at 5 p.m. Wednesday, after press time for the last issue of the Independent.'XH WR SRVVLEOH FRQLFWV ZLWK

    planning commission, other com-mitments, and time with my fam-ily, I do not believe this is the best time for me to run, Perlee said on Thursday.Perlee, who has served on the

    planning commission for three years, took a lead role in brokering the commissions compromise over the gravel extraction issues that had stalled the passage of the Bristol Town Plan. He told the Indepen-dent in a past interview that he was holding off on submitting his selectboard petition for candidacy while trying to ascertain whether he could retain some of his planning commission duties. Ive poured my heart and soul

    into this thing for three years, Per-lee said at the time, adding that he believed that vacating his seat at this time would be a disservice to the town.

    With Perlees withdrawal from the race, Brian Fox and John Moy-ers are left to duke it out over the three-year seat currently held by Carol Wells, who announced in December that she would not seek UHHOHFWLRQ )R[ D SROLFH RIFHUin Hinesburg and president of the Bristol Rescue Squad, is running IRUWKHUVWWLPH0R\HUVDGRZQ-town real estate owner and founder of the group Smart Growth for Bris-tol, made one previous unsuccess-ful bid for the selectboard in 2011 against John Peeker Heffernan. Heffernan, whose two-year seat

    will expire this year, is running for re-election uncontested.

    By JOHN FLOWERSMIDDLEBURY Barring suc-

    cessful mediation, a Rutland County jury on May 6 will begin hearing a ODZVXLWOHGLQE\IRUPHU$GGL-son Central Supervisory Union Busi-ness Manager Sharon Stearns against WKH$&68,Q KHU ODZVXLW OHG LQ 5XWODQG

    County Superior Court on Sept. 13, 2011 Stearns alleges that she was bullied by Lee Sease, who was during her em-ployment superintendent RI $&68 DQG WKHQ ZDVplaced on administrative leave after she complained about his behavior.Stearns served as the $&68V EXVLQHVV PDQ-ager for nine years be-fore resigning during the spring of 2011 under strained circumstances. 6KHOHGD ODZVXLWDOOHJ-ing, among other things, that: 6HDVHZKRVHFRQ-

    tract was not renewed by WKH$&68ERDUG LQand has his own lawsuit pending against the dis-trict had been bul-lying her and creating a hostile work environ-ment. 6HDVH HYHQWXDOO\ SODFHG KHU RQ

    administrative leave, ordering that VKH XQGHUJR D WQHVV IRU GXW\evaluation before she could return to work. Stearns claimed that Sease PDQHXYHUHG WKH$&68ERDUG LQWRmandating that she undergo a psy-chological evaluation.8OWLPDWHO\WKH$&68ERDUGFRP-

    missioned a study of the work cli-PDWH ZLWKLQ WKH FHQWUDO RIFH DQGcreated a list of return-to-work condi-tions including monitoring of her performance as if she were on pro-bation that Stearns argued were onerous, unreasonable, intolerable and unacceptable. 7KHGLVWULFWLQDQQRXQFLQJ6WHD-

    rns being placed on administrative OHDYHGLGQRWJLYHDVSHFLFUHDVRQfor her departure, stating only she would be on personal leave for an LQGHQLWH SHULRG RI WLPH 7KLV DQ-nouncement, Stearns claims, left peo-ple with the impression that she was ill, or negligent.6WHDUQV LV VXLQJ WKH $&68 IRU

    wrongful constructive discharge and retaliation; wrongful termination-

    breach of employment contract; breach of im-plied employment con-tract; and breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing.Stearns alleges she

    has suffered irreparable injuries including loss of career opportunities, compensation and ben-HWVDQGRWKHUHFRQRPLFlosses; emotional pain and suffering; mental anguish; humiliation; embarrassment; personal indignity; and other in-tangible injuries.She is seeking com-

    pensatory and punitive damages, reimbursement for attorneys fees and other relief a jury might choose to award.7KH $&68 LV YLJRU-

    ously challenging the lawsuit with the aid of two attorneys, one repre-senting the school board, the other representing the districts insurance carrier, the Vermont School Boards Insurance Trust.,QD-DQHPDLOWR$&68ERDUG

    members, current Superintendent *DLO&RQOH\ FRQUPHG WKDW WKH GLV-tricts attorney had asked him to as-sist him with the jury selection for the Stearns case on Tuesday, Jan. 29, in Rutland. He said some of the deposi-tions had not been completed and an attempt at mediation would be sched-uled soon. If mediation proves unsuc-cessful, a jury trial will begin on May 6, he said.

    Perlee withdraws from Bristol race

    Jury draw proceeds for suit against ACSU

    The ACSU is vigorously challenging the lawsuit with the aid of two attorneys, one representing the school board, the other representing the districts insurance carrier, the Vermont School Boards Insurance Trust.

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 15

    VALENTINES COUPLES CONTEST

    The warm and cozy atmosphere of the charming Waybury Inn will make this complementary from Blossom Basket

    Ss Fire & Ice Restaurant D &/ Middlebury Floral will s

    Spackage. Enjoy a complementary nights stay at the Middlebury Inn where a fresh Just Because Flowers will brighten the room. Wake up for a complementary breakfast and head to Waterfalls Day Spatbe well on your way to bliss and just may decide to make

    Correctly match the local couples and enter to win one of three amazing Valentines Day

    packages, donated from some of our favorite

    local businesses.

    Use these descriptions, as well as any other insider information you may have, to match the pairs!

    Bring your ent

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    Prizes can be redeemed at any time, not just on

    Valentines Day!You may also submit your entry by sending an email to

    Christy@addisonindependent.

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    is spent with friends and family. This make the holidays in Middlebury

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    named an All-American and Rookie of the Year in a sport

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    6DMain Street mogul who hangs out in an old ice

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  • PAGE 16 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    By LEE J. KAHRSBRANDON The Otter Valley

    Union School Board has approved a $10,542,068 spending plan for the VFDO\HDU WKDW UHSUHVHQWVD SHUFHQW LQFUHDVH 2IFLDOV DW-tributed the marginal increase to some creative shifting of personnel and the possible use of a reserve fund for com-puter equipment.The proposed budget amounts to

    a $209,518 increase over the current years spending plan.School boards are under tremen-GRXVSUHVVXUHHDFKVFDO\HDUWRNHHSFRVWVGRZQ7KDWWDVNLVDPSOLHGLQthe face of falling enrollment, as state funding a school receives is based on the number of students at each school fewer students mean less funding from the state.Enrollment at OV has been fall-

    ing more or less steadily for the last decade, meaning that administrators PXVWORRNWRWKHWZRPRVWFRVWO\EXWcontroversial areas to cut spending: staff and programming. There are cur-rently 571 students at OV, down from 584 last year, 599 in 2009 and 658 in (QUROOPHQWSHDNHGLQZLWK774 students.Per pupil spending in the proposed

    budget comes in at $13,922 based on the state formula. By compari-son, grade 7-12 schools with simi-lar enrollment are spending more DQG OHVV :RRGVWRFN 8QLRQ +LJK

    School, with 545 students, is spend-ing $16,415 per pupil. In Vergennes, ZKLFK KDV VWXGHQWV 98+6 LVspending $11,642 per pupil.Rutland Northeast Su-SHUYLVRU\8QLRQRIFLDOVpegged the anticipated education tax rate for towns that send students to OV at $1.46 up 12 cents from the cur-rent rate. The increase is partially due to the state education tax rate going up three cents to 92 cents.But this year, OV Prin-

    cipals Jim Avery and Nancy Robinson said WKH\WRRNDPRUHFUHDWLYHapproach, reallocating personnel from areas of dwindling need to areas they were needed more. For some teachers, it was a matter of changing the OD\RXW RI WKH ZRUNGD\that saved money.We believe we are EULQJLQJ D YHU\ VFDOO\ UHVSRQVLEOHbudget, Avery told the board at its Jan. 16 meeting. Positions that are cut or reduced have been reallocated to support student learning and other positions have been rescheduled dur-ing the day.For instance: 7KHUH LV WKH UHGXFWLRQ RI RQH

    part-time science teacher, but service to students will not be cut because a math position will cover two sections of physics that need to be taught in the

    science department. 7KHUH LV DOVR DQ

    English teacher position that will teach four sec-tions of social studies to PDNHXSDIXOOWLPHSRVL-tion. $ VRFLDO VWXG-

    ies position will now also include coordina-tion of the Youth and Adults Transforming Schools Together pro-gram, which may be an elective social studies course. That teacher will also oversee the Vermont Virtual Learning Coop-erative (VVLC) and the External Learning Op-portunities (ELO). The position of ELO coordi-nator, a part-time posi-tion, has been cut.

    $ZRUOG ODQJXDJHVSRVLWLRQZLOOQRZDOVRRYHUVHHWKRVHVWXGHQWVWDN-ing an online world language course through the VVLC. $ SK\VLFDO HGXFDWLRQ WHDFKHUV

    day will be restructured to include time before the school day begins. Alternatives to meet physical educa-tion requirements will be explored

    with students through personal learning plans to include opportuni-ties outside of the gymnasium. 7KH IDPLO\ DQG FRQVXPHU VFL-

    ence part-time teaching position will QRZ DOVR WHDFK SHUVRQDO QDQFH WRhelp with the half-time reduction in the business department. $ WKHDWHU GHSDUWPHQW SRVLWLRQZLOO H[ WR DOORZ VWXGHQWV WR HDUQQHDUWV FUHGLWRXWVLGHRI WKH WUDGL-tional school day by participating in school productions.Also, OV is bidding out its food

    service program, which will cut four food service positions from the bud-get for next year.Through these reallocations, a

    total of 4.5 full-time equivalent po-sitions will actually be cut, includ-ing a half-time business teacher, the part-time ELO coordinator position, a half-time custodial position, and four part-time food service posi-tions.The board also approved a school

    budget warning that includes Article ZKLFK DVNV YRWHUV WR H[SDQG WKHuse of the Reserve Fund to include grounds and equipment, in addition to maintenance, repair and facilities funding. There is roughly $500,000 in the fund.The reason for the wording change

    is to authorize the OV board to use $50,000 from the fund for new com-puter equipment.

    OVUHS sets budget with small hike2.3 percent spending increase covers personnel shifts, technology investments

    GMC hosts talk on MoosalamooMIDDLEBURY The Bread

    Loaf section of the Green Moun-tain Club on Thursday, Feb. 21, ZLOOVSRQVRUDWDONLQWKH-DPHV3Taylor series entitled Adventures LQRXU%DFN\DUG0RRVDODPRR1D-WLRQDO5HFUHDWLRQ$UHD7KHWDONLVat 7 p.m. at the Ilsley Public Library on Main Street in Middlebury. Designated in 2006 and com-

    prised of 15,857 acres and 70-plus miles of multi-use trails, the Moo-salamoo National Recreation Area is one of two national recreation areas in the Green Mountains. 2SSRUWXQLWLHV DERXQG IRU KLNLQJVQRZVKRHLQJFURVVFRXQWU\VNLLQJPRXQWDLQ ELNLQJ VQRZPRELOLQJFDPSLQJ DQG PRUH +ROO\ .QR[recreation and trail coordinator with the Rochester and Middlebury Ranger Districts, will share all the exciting recreational opportunities in this beautiful area. She will dis-cuss its many uses, how the Forest Service maintains and conserves this area, and how the Forest Ser-YLFH ZRUNHG ZLWK SDUWQHUV DQGvolunteers throughout the Green Mountain National Forest to repair LQIUDVWUXFWXUHLQWKHZDNHRI7URSL-cal Storm Irene.The Green Mountain Club will OHDG D KLNH RU VQRZVKRH LQ WKH0RRVDODPRR DUHD WR 5DWWOHVQDNHCliffs (3.9 miles round trip) on Sat-urday, Feb. 23. Call 388-0936 the ZHHNEHIRUHIRUGHWDLOV

    We believe we are bringing a YHU\VFDOO\UHVSRQVLEOHbudget. 3RVLWLRQVWKDWDUHFXWRUUHGXFHGhave been UHDOORFDWHGWRVXSSRUWVWXGHQWlearning and RWKHUSRVLWLRQVhave been UHVFKHGXOHGduring the day.

    3ULQFLSDOJim Avery

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 17

    Students of the Week from area High Schools

    Students of the week from all area high schools will receive a gift certificate from Vermont Book Shop.Students of the Week are chosen by school teachers and administration.

    Vergennes Students of the Week receive a free sandwich and drink from 3 SQUARES. Middlebury Students of the Week receive a free pizza from Green Peppers.

    Vergennes Union High School

    Alexandria Alex CrowellV.U.H.S

    Middlebury Union High School is pleased to recognize Nora McLaughlin as our Student of the Week. Nora is the daughter of Lisa and Devin McLaughlin of Middlebury. Her older brother, Sawyer, attends Tufts University and her younger sister, Satchel, is a seventh-grader at MUMS.

    Nora has earned High Honors at MUHS and is a member of the National Honor Society. She received an American Legion Department Award for English in grade 9 and science in grade 11. In addition, Nora received Honorable Mention for world languages in grade 9, world history in grade 10, and English in grade 11. She has scored in the top 10 percent in the UVM Math Competition and in grade 10 received the Latin Book Award.

    Nora was awarded the Society of Women Engineers Highest Honor in grade 11. Last year, she was also the recipient of the Wellesley College Book Award for her academic, personal, and co-curricular excellence. Nora has challenged herself academically by enrolling in Advanced Placement courses in AP calculus I and II, AP U.S. history, AP statistics, AP environmental science, AP world history and AP English. She completed a computer science course at Middlebury College last semester.

    Nora has competed for the Tigers on the soccer team all four years. She started playing varsity in grade 10 and was the captain this year. Nora has been a member of the ice hockey team since grade 10.

    Nora has served on the Student Senate for two years. She was a Peer Leader for grade 9 students this year. Nora was selected to attend HOBY (Hugh OBrian Youth Leadership Conference) in grade 10. Last summer, she attended the Governors Institute on Engineering.

    Nora was a member of the Concert Choir in grades 9-11. She was selected for the Honors Choir at Castleton State College in grade 10. This year, she will be performing in the upcoming senior play, Bye Bye Birdie.

    Nora has helped to coach U-12 (Under 12) ice hockey for the past three years. This year, she has been volunteering at the Mary Hogan Elementary School library.

    Outside of school, Nora has played club soccer since elementary school. This past summer, she worked at Camp Kookamunga. Nora enjoys downhill skiing, spending time with friends and walking her dog, Moose. She has visited Spain, Italy and Ireland, but her favorite place is the beach, especially Cape Cod.

    Nora will attend a four-year college this fall, where she will major in science. Everyone at MUHS wishes this motivated and caring young woman the very best in all her future endeavors.

    Middlebury Union High School

    Nora McLaughlinM.U.H.S.

    Vergennes Union High School is pleased to recognize Alexandria Crowell as its Student of the Week. Alexandria lives in Vergennes with her parents, Hilary and Richard Crowell.

    Alex has been on the honor or high honor roll since freshman year. She has consistently placed in the top 20 of her class and has challenged herself with AP US History, AP European History, and AP Composition and Language. Alexandria has also received awards in music and for her work ethic.

    Alexandria helped start the VUHS Literacy Society and serves as its current president. A member of the Debate/Forensics Team and a member of the Gay-Straight Alliance, she has also been honored for her writing at the New England Young Writers Conference and the Champlain Young Writers Conference. She is a member of the VUHS Concert Choir and Commodore Singers. She was selected this year to the Green Mountain Music Festival Chorus. Alex is perhaps most known to the VUHS community through her roles in school musicals. She was a Fagins Thief in Oliver! Cora in Thoroughly Modern Millie, Mrs. Paroo in The Music Man and concierge Martha Watson in White Christmas. In the summer, she also participates in the Vermont Young Playwrights.

    In her spare time Alexandria tutors a VUES student and volunteers at Bixby Memorial Library. Fostering her love of history, Alexandria also volunteers at the Maritime Museum and for the Vergennes Rescue Department.

    Outside of school, Alex can be found singing and acting, but admits that her biggest passion is literature. She says, Another hobby of mine is camping, and boating of any kind. I also love the beach a lot.:KHQDVNHGDERXWKHUSKLORVRSK\RQOLIH$OH[DQGULDUHPDUNHG7KHVH\HDUVRI\RXUOLIHVKRXOGEHGHGLFDWHGWRQGLQJ\RXULQGLYLGXDOLVP

    and exploring who you are. Her advice to other students: Dont waste time in school take advantage of the free education that you have.$ERXW $OH[DQGULD 98+6 +LVWRU\ 7HDFKHU 3DPHOD 7D\ORU VDLG $OH[ LV D G\QDPLF DUWLFXODWH PXOWLIDFHWHG \RXQJ ODG\ 6KH LV D QH

    representative of our Five Guidelines and an example for other students to emulate. I have always enjoyed her sharing her original thoughts, perspectives and the fun we had during our class discussions.

    Following graduation from VUHS, Alexandria plans to attend a small, liberal arts college in New England, pursuing a major in history and DQWKURSRORJ\ZLWKDQHGXFDWLRQFHUWLFDWHDQGDPLQRULQFUHDWLYHZULWLQJ7KHIDFXOW\VWDIIDQG98+6FRPPXQLW\ZLVK$OH[DQGULDWKHYHU\best in her future endeavors.

    Best of Luck in the future to allAddison County Students!

    INDEPENDENTADDISON COUNTY

    VERMONTS TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER0LGGOHEXU\97ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

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  • PAGE 18 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    MONDAY

    SPORTS

    ScoreScoreBOARD

    COMMODORE SENIORS STANLEY Salley, left, and Charlie Stapleford try to beat Middlebury freshman Perry DeLorenzo to a rebound Friday night. Vergennes won the game, 58-52.

    Independent photo/Trent Campbell

    Commodores outlast scrappy Tigers, 58-52VUHS victorious in a seesaw battle

    HIGH SCHOOL SPORTSGirls Hockey

    1/30 MUHS vs. U-32 ...............................6-02/1 N. Country vs. MUHS ...................... 3-1

    Boys Hockey1/30 MUHS vs. Missisquoi ..................... 2-22/1 MUHS vs. Stowe ...............................6-3

    Boys Basketball2/1 VUHS vs. MUHS ......................... 58-522/1 Missisquoi vs. Mt. Abe ................. 89-572/2 OV vs. Poultney ........................... 49-45

    Girls Basketball1/30 OV vs. Mt. Anthony .....................48-291/30 MUHS vs. Missisquoi ...................43-37 1/30 Mt. Abe vs. Colchester ................48-361/30 Milton vs. VUHS .........................59-371/31 OV vs. Brattleboro ..................... 46-43

    COLLEGE SPORTSMens Hockey

    2/1 Midd. vs. Wesleyan ......................... 6-32/2 Midd. vs. Trinity ................................ 3-2

    Womens Hockey1/30 Plattsburgh vs. Midd. ..................... 3-12/2 Conn. vs. Midd. ................................ 3-2

    Mens Basketball2/1 Midd. vs. Bowdoin ....................... 72-612/2 Midd. vs. Colby ............................ 85-62

    Womens Basketball2/1 Bowdoin vs. Midd. ....................... 60-402/2 Midd. vs. Colby ............................ 52-48

    By ANDY KIRKALDYMIDDLEBURY Round One

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    By ANDY KIRKALDY%2/7219$//(

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 19

    By ANDY KIRKALDYMIDDLEBURY For much

    of Fridays game against visiting North Country, it looked like the Middlebury Union High School girls hockey team would earn what has been an elusive win against a top-four Division II team.7KH IWKSODFH7LJHUV KDYH URX-

    tinely outshot the teams above them in the standings, but have come up on the short end on the scoreboard. Early in Fridays contest, they

    took it to the second-place Falcons, outshooting them in the scoreless UVWSHULRGDQGWKHQHDUQLQJthe lead on junior Rachel Howletts tip-in of classmate Paige Viens slapper at 6:44 of the second.But although the Tigers contin-

    ued to control the territory, they did not maintain the crispness of their passing. And North Country kept plugging, and despite the Tigers 28-9 advantage in shots on goal, it ZDVWKH)DOFRQVZKRVNDWHGDZD\ZLWKDYLFWRU\North Country tied the game

    late in the second period, and then VFRUHG WZRJRDOV LQ VHFRQGV LQthe third.MUHS co-coach Tim Howlett

    remains optimistic there was a lot to like on Friday and in Wednes-GD\VKRPHZLQRYHU8%XWlike so many coaches, Howlett and

    co-coaches Matt Brush and Derek Bartlett are remind-ing their 7-6 team it has to play a full 45 minutes. When were on, and ev-

    eryone is contributing, as you saw in the better part of this game, we can be a force to be reckoned with, Howlett said. But we turn off the competitive switch for a minute, and two goals in the net. Were standing there watching them, and bad things happen. So I hope they learn from it.Certainly, the coaches

    were happy with the MUHS effort on Wednesday, when despite being shorthanded they breezed past U-32 as senior reserve goalie Ali Sheldrick worked an VDYH VKXWRXW 6L[ 7L-gers scored: Viens, Nora McLaughlin, Sara Boe, Tay-lor Becker, Emma Best and Angela Carone, while Boe, Best and Carone picked up assists. $QGWKH7LJHUVVWDUWHGRXWRQUH

    on Friday, forcing NCU goalie Mi-NDHOOD'RUDQWRPDNHRIKHUVDYHVLQWKHUVWSHULRGQRWDEO\RQD7LPL&DURQHGHHFWLRQRID/DXUHQBartlett shot from the left point and a Viens shot from the right-wing

    FLUFOHDVDSRZHUSOD\H[SLUHGDoran probably did her best work

    early in the 2nd period, when she denied Angela Carone and Timi &DURQHIURPWKHVORWLQWKHUVWPLQ-XWHDWWKHWZRPLQXWHPDUNDVKHGher right pad to stone a Best break-away, and stopped a series of Timi Carone shots from the left circle.

    MIDDLEBURY The Middlebury Union High School boys hockey team picked up a ZLQDQGDWLHODVWZHHNWRPRYHEDFNXSWRat 5-5-2. On Wednesday, the Tigers got a late goal from

    Keenan Bartlett to earn a 2-2 tie at Missisquoi. Bartlett scored with two minutes left in regulation DV08+6FDPHEDFNIURPDRQHJRDOGHFLWIRUthe second time. Sawyer Hescock notched the oth-

    er Tiger score, and goalie Edgar Sherman stopped VKRWV7KH7LJHUVRXWVKRWWKH7%LUGVDQG098JRDOLH1DWH0XOOHUPDGHVDYHV2Q)ULGD\WKH7LJHUVEURNHRSHQDJDPH

    with three straight second-period goals against visiting Stowe on the way to a 6-3 victory. The 7LJHUVRXWVKRW6WRZHDQGOHGE\EH-fore two late Raider scores. Justin Stone scored twice and added a pair

    of assists, Nathan Lalonde scored twice, and Bartlett scored and had three assists to spark the Tiger attack. Kevin Galenkamps second-period JRDOWKHUVWRIKLVFDUHHUVQDSSHGWKHWLHwhile Trevor Emilo contributed two assists and Ryan Crowningshield and Hescock added one KHOSHUDSLHFH6KHUPDQPDGHVDYHVThe Tigers host Rutland at 7 p.m. on Wednes-

    day.

    By ANDY KIRKALDYADDISON COUNTY In local high

    school basketball action in the latter part of last week, the Middlebury girls made it two straight wins, the Mount Abraham girls prevailed in a key Lake Division clash, the Otter Valley girls won twice in two days, the Otter Valley boys won on the road, but the Eagle boys and Vergennes girls came up short. The VUHS boys also visited MUHS on )ULGD\VHHVWRU\RQ3DJHTIGER GIRLSOn Wednesday, the Tiger girls made it two

    wins in a row by outlasting visiting Missis-quoi, 43-37. Tiffany Danyows SRLQWVsparked the Tigers as they improved to 2-9 heading into Mondays visit to Vergennes.EAGLE GIRLS On Wednesday, the Eagle girls picked up

    a critical home win against visiting Divi-sion I Colchester, 48-36. The victory kept the Eagles in the hunt for the Lake Division crown and on top of the D-II standings at Ashlie FayVFRUHGWROHDG0RXQWAbe, Meghan Livingston DGGHG DQGIsabel Brennan contributed eight points DQGERDUGVOV GIRLSOn Wednesday, the OV girls defeated

    visiting D-I Mount Anthony, 48-29, a win Coach Steve Keith said was keyed by tough team defense. He particularly credited the work of freshman center Amy Jones in the paint. At the other end, Jessica Frazier VSDUNHG WKHRIIHQVHZLWKSRLQWVOlivia Bloomer score nine, while Brittany Bush-ey and Taylor Aines added seven apiece. On Thursday, the Otters knocked off their

    second D-I foe in two nights, winning at Brattleboro, 46-43. The Otters led almost wire-to-wire, going up by nine in the second period on hoops by Frazier, Bloomer and $LQHVDQGE\LQWKHWKLUGEHIRUHWKHColonels began to rally. Two late hoops by Frazier gave OV some

    breathing room, and they survived when the 4-7 Colonels missed two free throws that could have tied the game at 45-45, and then could not get off a game-tying three-point DWWHPSW RQ WKHLU QDO SRVVHVVLRQ )UD]LHUVFRUHGDVWKH2WWHUVHYHQHGWKHLUUHFRUGat 6-6. OV BOYSOn Saturday, the OV boys rallied from D QLQHSRLQW WKLUGTXDUWHU GHFLW WR HGJHhost Poultney, 49-45. The Otters wiped out WKDWGHFLWZLWKDUXQWRWLHWKHJDPHDW38-38 and held Poultney to seven points in WKHQDOPLQXWHVRyan Kelley led OV with 27 points and iced the win by hitting IRXUVWUDLJKWIUHHWKURZVLQWKHQDOPLQXWHJohn WinslowFKLSSHGLQSRLQWVDVWKH2WWHUVLPSURYHGWREAGLE BOYS2Q )ULGD\ YLVLWLQJ 0LVVLVTXRL

    rode another big night from standout Matt 6W$PRXUSRLQWVDQGDVVLVWV WRDQ89-57 win over the Eagle boys.7KH(DJOHVGURSSHGWRDQGZHUHOHGE\SRLQWVIURPSawyer KammanDQGfrom Mark Jipner. VUHS GIRLSOn Wednesday, visiting Milton topped

    the VUHS girls, 59-37. The Commodores GURSSHG WR KHDGLQJ LQWR 0RQGD\VKRPH JDPH YV08+6 GHVSLWH SRLQWVfrom Taylor PaquetteDQGIURPRuby Dombek.

    In high school hoop

    Most girls teams win

    MIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH School junior Timothea Carone sends a pass between the skates of a North Country defender Friday at the Memorial Sports Center. Middlebury lost the game, 3-1.

    Independent photo/Trent Campbell

    TIGER FRESHMAN LAUREN BARTLETT clears the puck past North Country defender Jenna Moss Friday in Middlebury.

    Independent photo/Trent Campbell

    Tiger girls start strong, fall to NCU, 3-1

    The Tigers broke through at 6:44. They won a faceoff in the left-wing circle directly back to Viens at the cen-ter point, and she shot toward the right side of the net. There, Howlett tipped it solidly inside the post. Afterward, Coach Howlett agreed

    the Tigers play dropped off a bit af-ter that score, even if they still carried most of the play and defenders Becker, Best, Bartlett and Viens continued to shut down most of the Falcon rushes. Youre either going to and

    move forward and keep pounding, or \RXUHJRLQJWREHDOLWWOHVDWLVHGKHVDLG ,I\RXJHW D OLWWOH VDWLVHG LWVnot going to work, and you let in three unanswered goals the second half of the game.7KH)DOFRQV HTXDOL]HG DW RI

    the second. Emily Doty shot from the right point, and Tiger goalie Baily Ryan who earlier had made a ter-ULFVDYHRQD:KLWQH\%HUQLHUEUHDN-away stopped that shot and Crystal 0RVVV UVW UHERXQG ELG %XW 0RVVstuffed home the second rebound, and the Falcons had tied the game on their fourth shot on net.They took the lead at 4:53 of the

    third when the Tigers failed to clear cleanly. Emilie Paul picked up the puck and sent Bernier into the left-wing circle, and she wristed home a IRRWHUNCU got its pad goal off the ensu-

    ing faceoff on a two-on-one break af-ter a failed challenge at the blue line.

    Bernier crossed from the right-wing circle to Moss at the left post, and she one-timed it in; Ryan had no chance. The Tigers had a couple

    great opportunities. Doran made the save of the game, sliding to her left to deny Howlett on a cross-crease pass from Boe. Doran also stopped McLaughlin and Best from the slot as the Fal-cons held on for the two-goal win.Coach Howlett said the Ti-

    gers have the ability to start converting their opportuni-ties. We just have to be a little

    bit nastier in front of the net, he said.And Howlett believes the

    Tigers will get a lift once they do break through against a top team. We talk about game like

    this. There are four teams above us in the standings, and of RXU ODVW VL[ JDPHV YH RI WKRVH DUHagainst teams that are above us, he said. Weve got to learn that we can beat teams like that, and I think one of those victories will certainly go a long ZD\IRURXUFRQGHQFHDQGKHOSXVDVwe get closer to the postseason.

    Boys hockey returns to .500 with win over Stowe

  • PAGE 20 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753MCTV SCHEDULE Channels 15 & 16 Please see the MCTV website, www.middleburycommunitytv.org, for changes in the schedule; MCTV events, classes and news; and to view many programs online. Submit listings to the above address, or call 388-3062.MCTV Channel 15Tuesday, Feb. 5 4:30 a.m. Public Affairs 6:30 a.m. Legislative Breakfast 8 a.m. Congregational Church Service 9:30 a.m. Rep. Betty Nuovo 10 a.m. Selectboard 12:30 p.m. Development Review Board (DRB) 2:30 p.m. Vermont Today 4 p.m. Chronique Francophone 4:30 p.m. Vershire Bible Church Service 7 p.m. Selectboard 10 p.m. Mid East Digest 11 p.m. Vermont Today Wednesday, Feb. 6 4:56 a.m. Vermont Today 6:30 a.m. Mid East Digest 7:30 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 10 a.m. Selectboard/Public Affairs 3 p.m. Salaam Shalom 4 p.m. Words of Peace 5:30 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 6 p.m. Chronique Francophone 6:30 p.m. Rep. Betty Nuovo 7 p.m. DRB 9 p.m. Legislative Breakfast/Public Affairs 10:30 Lifelines Thursday, Feb. 7 5:30 a.m. Green Mountain Veterans for Peace 6:30 a.m. Salaam Shalom 7:30 a.m. Public Affairs 10 a.m. Vershire Bible Church 11:30 a.m. Chronique Francophone Noon Selectboard/DRB 4 p.m. Legislative Breakfast/Public Affairs

    7:30 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 9 p.m. Rep. Betty Nuovo 9:30 p.m. DRBFriday/Saturday, Feb. 8/9 6 a.m. For the Animals 6:30 a.m. DRB 8:30 a.m. Chronique Francophone 9 a.m. Las Promesas de Dios 9:30 a.m. Rep. Betty Nuovo (Saturday only) 10 a.m. Selectboard Noon Legislative Breakfast/Public Affairs 3:30 p.m. Lifelines (Friday only) 3:30 p.m. For the Animals (Saturday only) 4 p.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 7:30 p.m. Rep. Betty Nuovo (Friday only) 8 p.m. Legislative Breakfast/Public Affairs 10:30 p.m. Salaam Shalom (Saturday only)Sunday, Feb. 10 5 a.m. Legislative Breakfast/Selectboard 7 a.m. Words of Peace 7:30 a.m. Chronique Francophone 8 a.m. Las Promesas de Dios 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 10 a.m. Green Mountain Veterans for Peace 11 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 1 p.m. Vershire Bible Church Service 4 p.m. Congregational Church Service 6:30 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 7 p.m. Catholic Mass 7:30 p.m. Acorn Energy Co-op Series 10 p.m. Words of Peace 10:30 p.m. Green Mountain Veterans for PeaceMonday, Feb. 11 5 a.m. Local/State Public Affairs 8:30 a.m. Chronique Francophone

    9 a.m. Lifelines 10 a.m. Selectboard/DRB 2:30 p.m. Rep. Betty Nuovo 3 p.m. Mid East Digest 4 p.m. Congregational Church Service 5:30 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 6 p.m. Public Affairs 7 p.m. Legislative Breaksfast/SelectboardMETV Channel 16Tuesday, Feb. 5 5 a.m. From the College 7:30 a.m. Middlebury Five-0 8 a.m. State Board of Education 12:30 p.m. ID-4 Board 6 p.m. UD-3 Board 10 p.m. Middlebury Five-0 10:30 p.m. State Board of Education Wednesday, Feb. 6 5:30 a.m. New England Review Reading Series 7 a.m. HCC Board 9 a.m. First Wednesday 10 a.m. UD-3/ID-4 Boards 4 p.m. High School Basketball 6 p.m. Middlebury Five-0 6:30 p.m. HCC/ACSU Boards 10 p.m. New England Review Reading Series 11 p.m. State Board of EducationThursday, Feb. 7 4:30 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange (VMX) 6:30 a.m. Addison County Chamber of Commerce: Tom Hughes on Embezzlement 8 a.m. State Board of Education 12:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-0 1 p.m. New England Review Reading Series 2:30 p.m. From the College

    6 p.m. At the Ilsley 7 p.m. Vermont Invasives with Chris Olson 8 p.m. MUHS Boys Basketball 9 p.m. New England Review Reading Series 11:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-0Friday/Saturday, Feb. 8/9 6 a.m. Vermont Invasives with Chris Olson 7 a.m. ID-4 Board 11 a.m. UD-3/ACSU/HCC Boards 3 p.m. Vermont Invasives with Chris Olson 3:30 p.m. MUHS Boys Basketball 5:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-0 6 p.m. Otter Creek Audubon Society 7:30 p.m. MUHS Boys Basketball 8:30 p.m. First Wednesday 10 p.m. New England Review Reading Series 11 p.m. At the IlsleySunday, Feb. 10 6 a.m. Otter Creek Audubon Society 9 a.m. Middlebury Five-0 10 a.m. New England Review Reading Series Noon First Wednesday 1 p.m. At the Ilsley 2 p.m. MUHS Basketball 4 p.m. From the College 5:45 p.m. Vermont Invasives with Chris Olson 7:30 p.m. MUHS Basketball 9:30 p.m. New England Review Reading Series Monday, Feb. 11 5 a.m. Vermont Invasives with Chris Olson 8 a.m. State Board of Education/VMX 12:34 p.m. ACSU Board 2 p.m. UD-3 Board 4 p.m. From the College 7 p.m. ID-4 Board/State Board of Education

    ond quarter on a 6-2 run capped by a Quattrocci fast-break hoop at 5:30 to make it 26-9. But VUHS did not score again until early in the third period, as MUHS began to cover the VUHS cutters. MUHS freshman Perry DeLorenzo

    came off the bench to score eight of his 10 points in the second period and teamed up with Weekes and senior guard James Hare to start controlling the boards DeLorenzo and Hare HDFKQLVKHGZLWKVHYHQUHERXQGV,QWKHQDORIWKHKDOI'H/R-UHQ]RVDQNDWKUHHWKH7LJHUVQDOO\got the ball to senior forward Tyler Provencher in the post for a bucket, and Weekes hit two free throws. The VUHS lead was down to 26-20 at halftime, and the Tiger fans were making the noise. Provencher and Quattrochi (nine

    points) traded hoops to open the sec-ond half, but that was the only VUHS EXFNHW LQ WKHUVW0HDQZKLOHProvencher (a game-high 19 points, 17 in the second half) hit a three, De-Lorenzo scored on the break, and at &RQQRU&ROOLQVSRLQWVYHrebounds, four assists) drove for a three-point play, and the Tigers had the lead, 30-28. That triggered a series of lead

    changes: 7ZR 6DOOH\ WKUHH WKURZV DQG D

    putback made it 32-30. 3URYHQFKHU QDLOHG D WKUHH

    32, MUHS. 2XHOOHWWHSRLQWVVHYHQRIWKH98+6VWHDOVKLWDMXPSHUVUHS. :HHNHVVWXFN LQDSXWEDFN 6DOOH\ FRQYHUWHG D WKUHHSRLQW

    play: 37-35. 7ZR&ROOLQVIUHHWKURZVWLHGLWDW

    37-37.

    &DUWHU SRLQWV DWWDFNHG WKHrim: 39-37, VUHS, after three peri-ods. Hare hit two free throws to open

    the fourth to make it 39-39. VUHS DQVZHUHGZLWKD&DUWHUWKUHHSRLQWHUsandwiched between Stapleford and 2XHOOHWWHIUHHWKURZVWKHODWWHUPDN-LQJLWZLWKWRSOD\LQWKH

    game. $JDLQ08+6UHVSRQGHG&ROOLQV

    stole the ball and scored, Provencher converted a three-point play on the break with an assist from Weekes, and then scored in the lane on a feed IURP&ROOLQVDWThe Tigers then had possession and

    a chance for the lead, but Stapleford

    stole the ball and went coast-to-coast IRUDQDFUREDWLFQLVKVUHS coach Peter Quinn said WKHUHZHUH WLPHVZKHQWKH&RPPR-dores lost focus on defense, but ulti-mately their defense made the differ-ence. We had 15 steals tonight, Quinn

    said. That was maybe the key statis-tic in the game.3URYHQFKHUKLW LQ WKHSRVWDWWRWLHWKHJDPHEXWWKH&RPPRGRUHVPRYHG WKH EDOO WR VHW XS&DUWHU IRUan open look from the top of the key, DQG&DUWHUEXULHGLWDWWRPDNHLWProvencher hit two free throws at

    2:03 to make it 51-50, but at 1:31 Sal-ley drove for a three-point play, and the lead was four.

    $ &ROOLQV SXWEDFNPDGHLWDWand the Tigers forced RQH RI WKH 98+6turnovers, but threw the ball away them-VHOYHV$W 4XDW-trocci missed the front end of a one-and-one, and MUHS had anoth-er chance. But Quat-trocci stole the ball DQGIHG2XHOOHWWHIRUDfour-point lead, and at 0:15 Devin Hayes iced the game with two free throws. Quinn said the game

    was played in waves, crediting the Tigers for their mid-game revival. We played a great UVW TXDUWHU $QGthen in the second quar-ter we lost that edge, Quinn said. And then when we needed it, we got it back in the fourth quarter.Round Two is at the &RPPRGRPH RQ )HE19. Altemose said the

    Tigers will be anxious for the re-match. It will be a fun one up there, too,

    he said. Theyll be looking forward to that one.

    double duty so all could participate: -RQDK 6XSHUQRYLFK *URYHVDQG*HRUJH0XOFDK\ZHUH QLQWK LQ29:22. +DYHQ7DWH%R7UDQDQG5REHUW$YHU\ZHUHWKLQ 0XOFDK\0DWLDV3\OHDQG5RQ-QLH0HWFDOIZHUHWKLQ

    Nordic(Continued from Page 18)

    VERGENNES UNION HIGH School senior Charlie Stapleford draws a foul as he goes up against Middleburys Tyler Provencher, left, and Perry DeLorenzo Friday night.

    Independent photos/Trent Campbell

    TIGER MARROTT WEEKES gets his hand on a layup by Commodore Shep Carter during Friday nights game in Middlebury.

    Hoops(Continued from Page 18)

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 21

    KEEPINGYOU

    DOWN?

    WINTERBLUES

    Dont miss the winter wellness focus

    in the upcoming

    Health & Well-being

    Supplement in the Thursday,

    February 14th edition.

    INDEPENDENTADDISON COUNTY

    VERMONTS TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER0LGGOHEXU\97ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

    Addison Family Medicine 388-6777

    Bristol Internal Medicine 453-7422

    For more information about each of these providers, including their areas of practice and practice interests,

    visit www.portermedical.org

    Please call to schedule an appointment with one of these providers:

    Neshobe Family Medicine 247-3755

    Porter Internal Medicine 388-8805

    The following providers are now accepting New Patients

    Tom Beauregard, PA Michael Csaszar, MD Deborah Huber, MD Robin Frantz, APRN

    Gretchen Gaida Michaels, MD Emily Glick, MD

    Laura Wilkinson, APRNNaomi Hodde, MD Maria Cabri, APRN

    Community Chorus concerts will explore music old and newMIDDLEBURY The Middle-

    bury College Community Chorus announces a new season to pre-pare for concerts on Mothers Day weekend, May 10 and 12. Regular rehearsals are Sunday and Tuesday evenings from 7-8:30 p.m. in Mead Chapel on the Middlebury College campus. Rehearsals begin Sunday, Feb. 10, at 7 p.m. Singers are wel-come to join the chorus through Feb. 26; participants should plan to attend at least one rehearsal each week.The chorus will explore a mix

    of music old and new for its an-nual Mothers Day weekend per-formance. The main work on the program is baroque composer An-tonio Vivaldis splendid Gloria! From past performances they re-prise two works with rich choral songs by award-winning American

    composer Morten Lauridsen, Sure on This Shining Night and Di-rait-on. They introduce American composer Emma Lou Diemers delightful Three Madrigals on texts of Shakespeare. The program will close with an upbeat dynamic setting of traditional texts titled Sing a New Song by Ron Staheli, director of the choral program at Brigham Young University.

    Jeff Rehbach has served as di-rector of the community chorus since 2000. He also leads the Ver-mont Choral Union, based in Essex Junction, and previously conducted the Middlebury College Chamber Singers. Timothy Guiles returns to the chorus as accompanist this season. Guiles also accompanies the Vermont Symphony Orchestra Chorus, and has served as musi-

    cal director or accompanist for musical theater groups across the state including the Valley Players, Middlebury College Music Depart-ment, and Middlebury Community Players.The Middlebury College Com-

    munity Chorus welcomes all inter-ested singers to join the ensemble. Numbering nearly 100 singers, the group is open without audition to

    all singers who can follow a musi-cal score. Its members travel from throughout the region to participate in this 150-year-old community tra-dition, hosted by Middlebury Col-lege. For more information, check on

    the web at http://go.middlebury.edu/communitychorus or contact direc-tor Jeff Rehbach at 989-7355 or manager Barbara Merz at 443-5356.

  • PAGE 22 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

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    up a meeting with Gov. Peter Shum-lin, who must decide who serves in Clarks place during this biennium.But Castimore made Shumlins

    task easier on Thursday when she told the Addison Independent that she was dropping out of the race for personal reasons, primarily related to an already very busy schedule. In addition to running her own organic vegetable farm in Waltham, Casti-more is a longtime promoter/partici-pant in the annual Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival that raises PRQH\ LQ WKH JKW DJDLQVW EUHDVWcancer. And she is lead coordinator of the Vergennes Community Food Shelf that is based at the Vergennes Congregational Church, where she is a parishioner.Castimore added she wants to

    make sure to have enough time to help her parents, who are in their golden years.While I would love the opportu-

    nity to serve my neighbors in a po-litical capacity, now is not the right time for me, said Castimore, who wished Van Wyck all the best.Van Wyck was surprised to hear

    of Castimores decision, but compli-mented her on her initial willingness to serve in the Legislature.As of Friday morning, neither

    Castimore nor Van Wyck had been scheduled for an interview with Shumlin. The lack of movement in the appointment process, according to Van Wyck, has led to concerns among some constituents in the Addison-3 district, which includes the communities of Ferrisburgh, Addison, Vergennes, Waltham and Panton. At this point, Rep. Diane Lanpher, D-Vergennes, is the lone representative for the two-seat dis-trict.Van Wyck, 60, is a senior project

    analyst with the University of Ver-mont and has lived in Ferrisburgh since 1978. He and his wife, Jea-nette, have six children all of

    whom live within the Addison-3 dis-trict. While Van Wyck has not previ-RXVO\KHOGORFDORUVWDWHZLGHRIFHhe has, through the years, been ac-tive in youth and adult church ac-tivities and in his childrens school functions.He joined the UVM staff 25 years

    ago, after having worked for seven years at what is now known as UTC Aerospace Systems in Vergennes.In his cur-

    rent job, Van Wyck focuses a lot of attention on converting many of UVMs documents from paper to an elec-tronic format. 2QH RI KLV UVWbig tasks was computerizing UVMs library book catalogu-ing system, which used to be RQ SDSHU OLQJcards. The uni-versity has also, with Van Wycks help, made the transition to bar-FRGHG LGHQWLFD-tion cards and on-line course registration.Van Wyck was an enthusiastic

    supporter of Clarks. He said he carefully considered throwing his name into the mix when the seat EHFDPH YDFDQW UVW DVNLQJ (LOHHQClark if she minded him applying for her late husbands legislative job. She not only gave her blessing, she offered Van Wyck her endorsement.Next, Van Wyck got UVMs per-

    mission to ratchet back his work hours so that he could serve in Montpelier.If appointed, Van Wyck said he

    will advocate for policies to make Vermont more business friendly and for initiatives to make farms more

    SURWDEOH +H ODPHQWHG WKH IDFWthat Vermont is losing many of its high school and college graduates to other states where jobs are more plentiful.We have an excess in regula-

    tions, said Van Wyck, who is con-cerned that wages are not keeping pace with the rising costs of state government.On the issue of health care, Van

    Wyck said he is not a fan of the states movement toward a single-payer health care system. It is a transition that Van Wyck said is full of too many unknowns and that is prompting some physicians to leave the state.Van Wyck is

    pleased, how-ever, with the states increas-ing move toward more freedom of choice in pub-lic education, and he favors a system in which education dol-

    lars follow the student to whichever school he or she attends. He praised Shumlins recent calls for boosting technology in schools and sees the potential for increased collabora-tions between UVM and research-and-development companies.The Ferrisburgh Republican is

    also concerned about increasing re-ports of crimes, particularly burglar-ies, in his district. With that in mind, he said he would support more crime JKWLQJLQLWLDWLYHVVan Wyck pledged to run for the

    Addison-3 seat in 2014 if he is ap-pointed to the position this year.Reporter John Flowers is at

    johnf@addisonindependent.com.

    WARREN VAN WYCK

    Van Wyck(Continued from Page 1)

    &2/&+(67(586'HSDUW-ment of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Vermont 6WDWH ([HFXWLYH 'LUHFWRU 5REHUWPaquin announced that beginning Feb. 5, USDA will issue pay-ments to dairy farmers enrolled in the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) program for the Septem-ber 2012 marketings. The Ameri-can Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 extended the authorization of the )RRG &RQVHUYDWLRQ DQG (QHUJ\Act of 2008 (the 2008 Farm Bill) through 2013 for many programs administered by FSA, including MILC. The 2008 Farm Bill exten-sion provides for a continuation of the MILC program through Sept. 30, 2013. MILC payments are triggered

    when the Boston Class I milk price falls below $16.94 per hundred-weight, after adjustment for the cost of dairy feed rations. MILC payments are calculated each

    month using the latest milk price and feed cost. As announced by FSA on Jan.

    22, all dairy producers MILC con-tracts are automatically extended WR 6HSW (OLJLEOH SURGXFHUVtherefore do not need to re-enroll in MILC. MILC operations with approved contracts will continue to receive monthly payments, if available. The payment rate for September

    2012 is approximately $0.59 per hundredweight. The payment rate for October 2012 marketings is approximately $0.02 per hundred-weight. The payment rate for No-vember 2012 marketings is zero. Before the October MILC pay-

    ment can be issued, dairy farmers must complete a new Average Ad-justed Gross Income (AGI) form for 2013. The new form, CCC-933 Average Adjusted Gross Income $*, &HUWLFDWLRQ DQG &RQVHQWto Disclosure of Tax Information,

    must complete by producers be-fore they can receive payments for a variety of programs adminis-tered by FSA and USDAs Natural Resources Conservation Service. Producers may obtain CCC-933 at their local USDA Service Cen-ter or online at www.fsa.usda.gov/ccc933. Dairy operations may select a

    production start month other than October 2012. Producers who want to select a production start month other than October 2012 PXVW YLVLW WKHLU ORFDO )6$ RIFHbetween Feb. 1 and Feb. 28, also known as a relief period. FSA will provide producers with

    information on program require-ments, updates and signups as the information becomes available. For more information on MILC, FRQWDFW D ORFDO )6$ FRXQW\ RIFHor visit the FSA website at www.fsa.usda.gov.

    Milk subsidies resume this week

    To see how we stack up against the rest, visit Yamahas You Tube channel and search Generator.To see our entire generator line or locate your nearest Yamaha dealer, visit yamaha-motor.com/generatorsFor further information, please call 1-800-88-YAMAHA.2012. Yamaha Motor Corporation, U.S.A. All rights reserved.

    Rhino Shown with optimal accessories on private property. Always protect the enviroment, and wear a seat belt, helmet, eye SURWHFWLRQDQGSURWHFWLYHFORWKLQJ0DULQH REMEMBER to always observe all applicable boating laws. Never drink and drive. 'UHVVSURSHUO\ZLWKD86&*DSSURYHGSHUVRQDORDWDWLRQGHYLFHDQGSURWHFWLYHJHDU

    A.C. SPORTSRoute 7

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    Opinions: Write a Letter to the Editor.Send it to news@addisonindependent.com

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 23

    Poverty is the focus of Vermont Folklife Centers new exhibitMIDDLEBURY The Ver-

    mont Folklife Center on Friday, Feb. 8, from 5-7 p.m. will host an opening reception for Parallels, a photo-documentary by Libby Hillhouse of Ryegate at the Centers Vision & Voice Documentary Workspace in Middle-bury.Pairing photo-

    graphic portraits and text drawn from inter-views, Hillhouse de-scribes this exhibit as an expression of love for the world of which everyone is a part.As she explains, In

    many Vermont com-munities there is a population of people living below the poverty OLQH ,Q IDFW LQ WKLV GLIFXOW HFR-

    nomic crisis, more and more of us have moved into the arena of low income by virtue of events not in

    our control.Parallels is my

    attempt to offer an intimate view into the lives of some of our low-income resi-dents, she contin-ues. The courage and outlook of those who make their way through these circum-stances mirrors, in wonderful ways, the lives of most middle-income people. I want to offer an opportunity for them to tell their stories, be heard, seen

    and, ultimately, known. Our lives may, indeed, be parallel. The un-fortunate reality is that parallel

    lines do not meet. Hillhouse is a graduate of the

    School for International Trainings &RQLFW 7UDQVIRUPDWLRQ $FURVVCultures program as well as a teacher for Speakers of Other Lan-guages. She has lived and taught English in both Israel and the West Bank. She is also the past direc-tor for Kids4Peace, an interfaith cross-cultural program for peace. Currently she is based at the Com-munity Restorative Justice Center in St. Johnsbury with the prisoner re-entry program and is a guardian ad litem in Juvenile Court. Working for social justice and

    cultural understanding have long been passions for Hillhouse, as has photography. This project is a blending of both of these interests, drawing together the intimacies of personal lives within the tension of social and cultural separation.Ultimately, I want people to

    view these photos, read the vi-gnettes and come away with a new sense of this community as some-how more whole, she said. It would be a bonus if we began to say hello as we pass on the street or even sit awhile to chat. 3DUDOOHOV ZDV UVW H[KLELWHG

    as a part of the Courageous Con-

    versations through Art series at Catamount Arts in St. Johnsbury. It will be on exhibit at the Vermont Folklife Center Feb. 8 through March 30 after which it will trav-el to the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier.The Vision & Voice Documen-

    tary Workspace is ADA acces-VLEOH RQ WKH UVW RRU RI WKH9HU-mont Folklife Center headquarters building at 88 Main St. in Middle-bury. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. For information about Parallels, call (802) 388-4964 or visit www.vermontfolklifecenter.org.

    Ultimately, I want people to view these photos, read the vignettes and come away with a new sense of this community as somehow more whole.

    Libby Hillhouse

    Home energy workshopto be offered in BristolBRISTOL A Home Energy

    Saving Workshop will be offered at Howden Hall in Bristol on Tues-GD\)HEDWSP%3,FHUWLHGcontractor Ted Lylis will show par-ticipants how to identify and prevent heat loss in a home and improve its WKHUPDOHIFLHQF\He will also explain how energy

    audits and Home Performance with

    Energy Star projects qualify home-owners for rebates up to $2,000 from (IFLHQF\9HUPRQW3DUWLFLSDQWVFDQenter to win a home energy saving NLWZKHQ WKH\SOHGJHHIFLHQF\DF-tion.The workshop is offered as part

    of the Vermont Home Energy Chal-lenge. See more online at www.ef-FLHQF\YHUPRQWDFWLRQ

    ADDISON COUNTY

    School News

    RSVP offering free tax help for seniorsMIDDLEBURY RSVP is once

    again offering AARPs free Tax-Aide program.IRS-trained volunteers will pre-

    pare state and federal income tax returns and answer tax questions for low- and moderate-income resi-dents of Addison County. Special at-tention will be given to those aged

    60 and older. Computer assistance will also be available to people who ZDQWWROHHOHFWURQLFDOO\XVLQJIUHHtax software. RSVP volunteers will be available at sites throughout the county.Call RSVP at 388-7044 to make

    an appointment.

    CANTON, N.Y. The following students are participating in St. Law-rence Universitys International Study Program for the spring 2013 semester.Katherine E. Higgins of Middle-

    bury, a member of the class of 2014, is studying in the universitys Kenya Semester Program. Higgins graduated from Kimball Union Academy.Sophie J. Owen-Jankowski of Bris-

    tol, a member of the class of 2014, is studying in the universitys Kenya

    Semester Program. Owen-Jankows-ki graduated from Mount Abraham Union High School.Sadie M. Thompson of New Ha-

    ven, a member of the class of 2014, is studying in the universitys Kenya Se-mester Program. Thompson graduated from Kimball Union Academy.Alison L. Walter of Salisbury, a

    member of the class of 2014, is study-ing in Italy-UGA. Walter graduated from Middlebury Union High School.

    County students to study abroad

    Emily Rule was named to the fall 2012 deans list in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at the University of Vermont. She is

    a student in the pre-veterinary pro-gram.Rule is the daughter of Charles

    and Kathleen Rule of New Haven.

    Army Private 2nd Class Ethan Orion Wener recently completed basic combat training at Fort Jack-son, S.C. He is currently stationed in Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., complet-ing seven weeks of advanced indi-

    vidual training in motor transporta-tion.Wener is the son of Robert and

    Lisa Wener of South Starksboro and a 2012 graduate of Mount Abraham Union High School.

  • PAGE 24 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    s VERMONTMOBILEVETCOM

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    I have lots of energy and will need lots of exercise. I enjoy nice long walks and fun playtime in the play yard. I will need for my new owners to provide me with leadership and a good routine. A good, basic obedience course would be right up my alley. Im loving and loyal, and I aim to please, but I will need some good structure to start with. Once I bond with you, I will make a wonderful friend!

    I adore people so much that I am working on my separation anxiety. Im learning to like my crate when people are around, but when left alone for too long, I get anxious. I adore the company of other dogs, but Ive no experience with cats or young children. ,YHKDGDURXJKVWDUWDWUVWEXW,KDYHVRPXFKSRWHQWLDODQGDPVR

    deserving of a loving and trusting home. Come meet me today and see what a special girl I am!

    What a handsome boy! Im Simon, one of the several wonderful dogs here at the shelter. Im a young, exuberant pup, but Im smart, loyal, and have lots of potential to learn commands.

    Because of my young age, I have lots of energy and would EHQHWIURPORWVRIH[HUFLVH,DPOHDUQLQJWRZDONSURSHUO\RQDleash. I would be a great hiking dog, and I will make someone a great companion if you have the time to train and work with me. Im working on my manners, and I aim to please so Ill be a quick learner.

    I dont mind other dogs, but I may chase cats to play. I also am working on my jumping so young children may not be for me.

    Im a sweet boy with a big heart who just needs some guidance and patience to guide me through my young years. Come meet me today and see what a special and handsome boy I am!

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    SCHAUMBURG, Ill. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recently released its U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook, which UHYHDOHG WKDW 9HUPRQW UDQNV UVW IRUSHW RZQHUVKLS ZLWK SHUFHQW RIhouseholds owning a pet.In 2006, which was the last time the

    AVMA put together the sourcebook, Vermont again made the top 10 list

    RISHWRZQHUV UDQNLQJUVWZLWKSHUFHQW RI KRXVHKROGV RZQLQJ D SHWVermont also ranked as the top state IRUFDWRZQHUVKLSLQThe survey is conducted by the $90$ HYHU\ YH \HDUV DQG DOZD\VLQFOXGHV D EUHDNGRZQ RI SHW RZQHU-ship by state. The most recent survey, conducted in 2012 but based on Dec. 31, 2011, numbers, reveals that the top 10 pet-owning states are: Vermont

    ZKHUH SHUFHQW RI KRXVHKROGVowned a pet, New Mexico with 67.6 SHUFHQW 6RXWK 'DNRWD ZLWK percent, Oregon with 63.6 percent, Maine with 62.9 percent, Washington with 62.7 percent, Arkansas with SHUFHQW:HVW9LUJLQLDZLWKpercent, Idaho with 62 percent and Wyoming with 61.8 percent.The 10 states in 2011 with the ORZHVW SHUFHQWDJH RI SHWRZQLQJhouseholds are: Rhode ,VODQG ZKHUH SHUFHQWRI KRXVHKROGV RZQHG DSHW 0LQQHVRWD ZLWK SHUFHQW &DOLIRUQLD ZLWK SHUFHQW 0DU\ODQGZLWK SHUFHQW,OOLQRLV ZLWK percent, Nebraska with SHUFHQW 8WDK ZLWKSHUFHQW1HZ-HUVH\ZLWK SHUFHQW 1HZ

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 25

    Soak Up The Sun!Dont spend your hard-earned money making the hot water or electricity that you use todaySOLAR IS MORE AFFORDABLE THAN EVER!

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    Green Mountain Power & Vermont Electric Cooperative will creditour solar customers $24,613.89 $29,536.67 throughout 2013.

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    Light!Bright!Warm!

    MONTPELIER A state-wide poster contest will challenge Vermont students to illustrate ways to effectively save and invest their money. The theme for the 2013 Be Money Wi$e Financial Literacy Poster Competition is: I can grow my money by The contest is open to third- through 12th-grade students. Grade division winners each win a $100 cash prize.For the last six years, the State 7UHDVXUHUV2IFHDQGWKH9HUPRQWBankers Association have spon-sored the competition. The purpose of the yearly contest is to give teach-ers and parents a tool to engage children in discussions on money management. The 2013 theme allows students to explore the concept of making an investment. Parents and teachers can discuss with students how they can save money through an interest-bearing DFFRXQW LQ D QDQFLDO LQVWLWXWLRQexplain how someone invests in VWRFNV RU ERQGV DQG H[SORUH KRZpeople buy something that grows in value, such as a business or home,

    WKDWFDQODWHUEHVROGDWDSURWThe contest features three grade

    categories: elementary, grades WKUHH WKURXJKYHPLGGOH VFKRROJUDGHV VL[ WKURXJK QLQH DQG KLJKschool, grades 10-12. Top-placing students and their teachers will be recognized at a Statehouse ceremony on April 11. In addition WR FDVK SUL]HV IRU WKH UVW SODFHdivision winners, the students schools also will receive a $100 cash award in recognition of their VXSSRUW RI QDQFLDO OLWHUDF\ 7KHprizes are donated by the Vermont Bankers Association. The dead-line for poster submissions to the 7UHDVXUHUV2IFHLV0DUFK

    Posters must be on white paper stock and between 8-1/2-by-11 inches and 11-by-17 inches. Vermont entries may be sent to WKH 7UHDVXUHUV 2IFH $WWHQWLRQPoster Competition, 109 State St., Montpelier, VT 05609. Complete contest details are available on WKH 7UHDVXUHUV 2IFH ZHEVLWHQDQFLDO OLWHUDF\ PDLQ SDJH *Rto www.MoneyEd.Vermont.gov to view the contest rules.Questions about the competi-

    tion may be directed to the State 7UHDVXUHUV 2IFH DW 1-800-642-3191 or via e-mail at Treasurers.2IFH#VWDWHYWXV.

    VERMONT The following local residents have been named to the deans list for the fall 2012 deans list at the University of Vermont. They are listed by town, year and major.Courtney R. Andersen, North

    Ferrisburgh, junior, Secondary (GXFDWLRQ (QJOLVK 0DULVVDAndersen, North Ferrisburgh, MXQLRU (QJOLVK (OLDV + %DOGZLQ9HUJHQQHV VHQLRU +LVWRU\ $QJHODM. Brisson, Shoreham, sophomore, 1HXURVFLHQFH $VKOH\ ( %UXQHWAddison, sophomore, Nuclear 0HGLFLQH 7HFKQRORJ\ (ULQ 1&DVVHOV%URZQ %ULVWRO UVW\HDU(QJOLVK 0LFKDHO &KDXFHU7RUHOOR9HUJHQQHV MXQLRU $QWKURSRORJ\2DNOH\5&ODUN1HZ+DYHQMXQLRU*HRJUDSK\ (OL]DEHWK & &ODYHOOHMiddlebury, senior, Early Childhood 6SHFLDO (GXFDWLRQ DQG 0DWWKHZE. Clayton, Bristol, junior, Medical Laboratory Sciences.Also, Sierra L. Dessureault, New +DYHQ UVW\HDU 8QGHFODUHGMorgan E. Devoid, North Ferrisburgh, junior, Dietetics, 1XWULWLRQ )RRG 6FLHQFHV %HODJ. Dobkowski, Lincoln, junior, %XVLQHVV $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ 'DQLHO 3Ellis, Orwell, senior, Exercise and 0RYHPHQW 6FLHQFHV +DUOH\ 'Eriksen, Vergennes, senior, Dietetics, 1XWULWLRQ)RRG6FLHQFHV6DUDK()DXYHU0LGGOHEXU\UVW\HDU$QLPDO6FLHQFHV *HUDOG 6 )LW]*HUDOGNorth Ferrisburgh, senior, Sustainable /DQGVFDSH +RUWLFXOWXUH $OH[DQGULD. +DOO 9HUJHQQHV VRSKRPRUH(QJOLVK 5REHUW . +DPLOWRQ%ULVWROUVW\HDU-DSDQHVH5HHG.+DQVRQ %ULVWRO MXQLRU 0HFKDQLFDO(QJLQHHULQJ DQG7XFNHU +DUZRRGAddison, sophomore, English.$OVR$VD)+XQW$GGLVRQVRSKR-PRUH%LRORJLFDO6FLHQFH0DOORU\/James, Weybridge, senior, Nutrition DQG )RRG 6FLHQFHV $QGUHZ .Killorin, Weybridge, senior, Electrical (QJLQHHULQJ 'HYRQ ( /DQH9HUJHQQHV MXQLRU (QJOLVK 6LODV&Larson, Addison, senior, Business $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ 'DQLHOOH 7 /HDK\Middlebury, senior, Nutrition DQG )RRG 6FLHQFHV 5\DQ (/+HXUHX[ /LQFROQ VRSKRPRUH%LRFKHPLVWU\ (PLO\ ) 0DJRRQ

    )HUULVEXUJK UVW\HDU (QJOLVKAriel R. Mondlak, Brandon, sopho-PRUH ,QGLYLGXDOO\ 'HVLJQHGAlexander V. Newton, Vergennes, VRSKRPRUH (QJOLVK $XEU\J. Norman, Vergennes, senior, (QJOLVK%HQMDPLQ73DUVRQV1RUWK)HUULVEXUJK UVW\HDU (QJOLVKand Adam S. Pouliot, Bristol, junior, Business Administration.Also, Chelsea M. Robbins, 2UZHOO UVW\HDU 0HGLFDO/DERUDWRU\ 6FLHQFHV (PLO\ .5XOH 1HZ +DYHQ MXQLRU $QLPDO6FLHQFHV 7HVV 3 6DYDJH %ULVWROVHQLRU (QJOLVK 7\OHU - 6DZ\HUVergennes, sophomore, Computer 6FLHQFH .HOVH\ / 6FDUERURXJKLeicester, sophomore, Dietetics, 1XWULWLRQ )RRG 6FLHQFHV (OHFWUD0 6KHD 3DQWRQ VHQLRU +LVWRU\Nina O. Shishko, Middlebury, VHQLRU 3V\FKRORJ\ (ULFD/6PLWKBristol, senior, Elementary Education . 0DULNR / 7RWWHQ 6DOLVEXU\VRSKRPRUH 0DWKHPDWLFV 'DYLG -Viscido, Vergennes, junior, Biological 6FLHQFH 9LVFD\D':DJQHU1RUWK)HUULVEXUJK MXQLRU 6WXGLR $UWand Taylor T. Wood, Cornwall, junior, Business Administration.

    Vt. kids posters to encourage saving

    REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

    Locals make UVM deans list

  • PAGE 26 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    Over 31 years of personalized, comfortable care in a high-tech dental office!

    New patients are always welcome!133&YDIBOHF4USFFU4VJUFt.JEEMFCVSZ

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    Heres wh

    at one reader has to say about us!

    Reader Comments

    Quotes are taken from reader comments submitted with subscription renewals.

    INDEPENDENTADDISON COUNTY

    VERMONTS TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER0LGGOHEXU\97ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

    A reader from Middlebury, Vt., writes,I love coming home on Tues. & Fri. to my local paper!

    Thanks for great coverage of school & youth sports & local community activities & news events. My kids love seeing

    themselves in the paper.

    We didnt think we needed a contingency of that size, but we did think we needed a contingency fund.

    Alderman Renny Perry

    Police station(Continued from Page 1)

    0,''/(%85

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 27

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  • PAGE 28 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

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    SERVICES DIRECTORYSTORAGESEPTIC

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    VERMONT The Vermont Ski Areas Association, the Agency of Agriculture and the Vermont Maple Foundation are once again joining forces to promote Vermont specialty foods at area ski resorts. Vermont Specialty Food Days of-fer skiers and riders the opportu-nity to sample tasty treats from a variety Vermont food companies while visiting resorts. In Addi-son County, Specialty Food Days will be held on Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Middlebury College Snow Bowl during Winter Carnival and on Saturday, March 9, at the Rikert Nordic Center.Participating vendors include

    Vermonts famous maple syrup, Cabots award winning cheddar cheese, Green Mountain Cof-fee Roasters, Ben and Jerrys ice cream, Liz Lovely cookies, Ver-mont Peanut Butter, Nutty Stephs Granola, Vermont Smoke and Cure, and Two Guys in Vermont soups. Vermont Weddings will also be sourcing local baked goods including cakes at selected events. These are always exciting and

    fun events for us, said Sarah Neith, Ski Vermonts public af-fairs director. Its a great way to showcase the Vermont brand and

    the forged bonds between ski in-dustry and culinary industries in Vermont. Skiers and riders also get to experience the combined plea-sure of snowy slopes and delicious Vermont food a great pairing. Many of the scheduled Specialty

    Food Days are happening in con-junction with other large events at the ski areas, resulting in fun for everyone. The full schedule for the 2013 Specialty Food Days is: 6DWXUGD\ )HE %URPOH\

    Mountain Resort 6XQGD\ )HE 0DJLF

    Mountain 6DWXUGD\ )HE 0LGGOH-

    bury College Snow Bowl during Winter Carnival 7XHVGD\)HE6PXJJOHUV

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    ton Mountain 6XQGD\ 0DUFK 3LFR

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    Snow during Brewers Festival.

    Ski association hosting specialty foods sampling opportunities

    MIDDLEBURY Alison R. Byerly, former Middlebury pro-vost and a member of the faculty at the college for 24 years, has been QDPHGWKHWKSUHVLGHQWRI/DID\-ette College in Easton, Pa.A nationally recognized scholar,

    Byerly is one of the nations most prominent thought leaders on the role of technology in higher educa-WLRQ WRGD\ 6KHZLOO WDNH RIFH RQ-XO\ DV WKH UVW ZRPDQpresident of Lafayette, which was founded in 1826.I am delighted that Alison

    Byerly will be our president at this important point in the colleges his-tory, said Edward W. Ahart, chair of Lafayettes board of trustees and a 1969 graduate of the college, in making the announcement. A vi-sionary leader, she has broad expe-rience and a deep understanding of the challenges and opportunities for undergraduate colleges now and in the future. She has a collaborative, open and communicative style and brings great passion and humor in addition to enormous energy and enthusiasm.Byerly, who served in leader-

    ship positions at Middlebury for 13

    years, holds an interdisciplinary ap-pointment as college professor. She is on leave as a visiting scholar in literature at MIT during the current academic year.I am greatly honored to be cho-VHQ DV /DID\HWWHV WK SUHVLGHQWand excited by the opportunity to lead such a dynamic and am-bitious institution, said Byerly. As an undergraduate college that encompasses both the traditional liberal arts and a strong engineer-ing program, Lafayette provides an extraordinary range and depth of opportunities to students, yet it

    remains deeply committed to the highly individualized, one-on-one mentoring that is the hallmark of the residential liberal arts college.Middlebury College President

    Ronald D. Liebowitz praised Byer-lys appointment at Lafayette. Alison was so effective at Mid-

    dlebury because she had strong principles that guided her decision-making and was skilled at seeing the larger picture and long-term EHQHWV RI WDNLQJ ZKDW ZDV QRWalways the popular, conventional or easy path, he said. Probably few provosts of liberal arts colleges have engaged as many proposals for innovation and change as she has. Her broad range of experiences will serve her very well as president of Lafayette.Marna C. Whittington, chair of

    Middleburys board of trustees, said, Alison takes a thoughtful ap-proach to the broad challenges fac-ing higher education today while also paying extraordinary attention to detail. She always works in a collegial and personable way that encourages dialogue and collabo-ration. She understands well the shared governance process and has worked very effectively with the board in these challenging times to identify the right priorities for Mid-dleburys future.

    ALISON R. BYERLY

    Middleburys Byerly to lead LafayetteProf, former provost tapped by Pa. college

  • CLASSIFIEDSAddison Independent

    PAGE 30 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    NoticeDOG TEAM CATERING. Seating 250, plus bar avail-able. Full menus available. 802-388-4831, dogteamcater-ing.net.

    PARTY RENTALS; China, flatware, glassware, linens. De-livery available. 802-388-4831.

    Cards of ThanksTHANK YOU HOLY Spirit and St. Jude for prayers answered. MA.

    THANK YOU TO ALL who sent such heart felt Birthday cards to me / Special thanks to those of the North Ferrisburgh Methodist Church, and Rosies Restaurant for the Birthday invitation. You all truly touched my heart. Best, Joyce Muzzy.

    Public MeetingsAL-ANON: FOR FAMILIES and friends affected by some-ones drinking. Members share experience, strength and hope to solve common problems. Newcomers welcome. Confi-dential. St. Stephens Church (use front side door and go to second floor) in Middlebury, Sunday nights 7:15-8:15pm.

    ALATEEN: FOR YOUNG PEOPLE whove been af-fected by someones drinking. Members share experience, strength, hope to solve com-mon problems. Meets Wednes-days 7:15-8:15pm downstairs in Turning Point Center of Ad-dison County in Middlebury Marbleworks. (Al-Anon meets at same time nearby at St. Stephens Church.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS NORTH FERRISBURGH MEETINGS: Sunday, Daily Reflections Meeting 6:00-7:00 PM, at the United Methodist Church, Old Hollow Rd.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS VERGENNES MEETINGS: Sunday, 12 Step Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM. Friday, Discus-sion Meeting 8:00-9:00 PM. Both held at St. Pauls Church, Park St. Tuesday, Discussion Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM, at the Congregational Church, Wa-ter St.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS BRISTOL MEETINGS: Sun-day, Discussion Meeting 4:00-5:00 PM. Wednesday, 12 Step Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM. Friday, Big Book Meeting, 6:00-7:00 PM. All held at the Federated Church, Church St.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS BRANDON MEETINGS: Monday, Discussion Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM. Wednesday, 12 Step Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM. Friday, 12 Step Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM. All held at the St. Thomas Episcopal Church, RT 7 South.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS RIPTON MEETINGS: Mon-day, As Bill Sees It Meeting 7:15-8:15 AM. Thursday, Grapevine Meeting 6:00-7:00 PM. Both held at Ripton Fire-house, Dugway Rd.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS NEW HAVEN MEETINGS: Monday, Big Book Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM at the Congre-gational Church, New Haven Village Green.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MIDDLEBURY MEETINGS SUNDAY: 12 Step Meeting 9:00-10:00 AM held at the Middlebury United Methodist Church on N. Pleasant Street. Discussion Meeting 1:00-2:00 PM held at the Turning Point Center in the Marbleworks, Middlebury.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MIDDLEBURY MEETINGS MONDAY: As Bill Sees It Meeting Noon-1:00 PM. Big Book Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM. Both held at the Turning Point Center in the Marbleworks, Middlebury.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MIDDLEBURY MEETINGS TUESDAY: 11th Step Meet-ing Noon-1:00 PM. ALTEEN Group. Both held at Turning Point, 228 Maple Street. 12 Step Meeting Noon-1:00 PM. 12 Step Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM. Both held at the Turning Point Center in the Marbleworks, Middlebury.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MIDDLEBURY MEETINGS WEDNESDAY: Big Book Meet-ing 7:15-8:15 AM is held at the Middlebury United Meth-odist Church on N. Pleasant Street. Discussion Meeting Noon-1:00 PM. Womens Meet-ing 5:30-6:30 PM. Both held at The Turning Point Center in the Marbleworks, Middlebury.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MIDDLEBURY MEETINGS THURSDAY: Big Book Meeting Noon-1:00 PM at the Turning Point Center in the Marble-works, Middlebury. Speaker Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM at St. Stephens Church, Main St.(On the Green).

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MIDDLEBURY MEETINGS FRIDAY: Discussion Meeting Noon-1:00 PM at the Turn-ing Point in the Marbleworks, Middlebury.

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS MIDDLEBURY MEETINGS SATURDAY: Discussion Meeting 9:00-10:00 AM at the Middlebury United Methodist Church. Discussion Meeting 10:00-11:00 AM. Womens Meeting Noon-1:00 PM. Be-ginners Meeting 6:30-7:30 PM. These three meetings are held at the Turning Point Center in the Marbleworks, Middlebury.

    ARE YOU BOTHERED by someones drinking? Whatever your problems, there are those of us who have had them too. We invite you to our Opening Our Hearts Womens Al-Anon group, meeting every Wednes-day at 7:15 pm upstairs at St.Stephens on the Green in Middlebury.

    BIBLICAL RECOVERY GROUP Meeting, Mondays 6:30-7:30pm at Grace Bap-tist Church, Merchants Row, Middlebury. psalm62ministries.org .

    BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP: Survivors, family members and care givers are invited to share their experi-ence in a safe, secure and confidential environment. Meets monthly on the sec-ond Tuesday from 6:00pm to 8:00pm at the Hannaford Career Center, Room A214 (second floor, an elevator is available) in Middlebury. For more information, contact Beth Diamond 802-388-9505.

    IS LIFE FEELING like a con-stant struggle? In addition to taking over your life and who you are as a person? Do you remember when the simplest things could make you happy? If you said yes, come to the Turningpoint Center of Addison County for Life in Transition. These recovery meetings are for young adults, ages 16-25, with any kind of addiction. Meetings on Mondays and Fridays, 4-5 pm, at the center in the Marble Works in Middle-bury. Our support system will help you make a difference in your life. Stop in, even if it is just to talk. Its your life, choose how youre going to live it.

    OVEREATERS ANONY-MOUS: SATURDAYS at Lawrence Memorial Library, 1:00pm. 40 North Street, Bris-tol. For info call: 802-453-2368 or 802-388-7081.

    OVEREATERS ANONY-MOUS: TUESDAYS at Turn-ing Point Center, 5:15pm. Marble Works, Middlebury. For info call: 802-352-4525 or 802-388-7081.

    D E A D L I N E SThurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

    CLASSIFIED ORDER FORMPLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

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    NoticesCard of ThanksPersonalsServicesFree**Lost & Found**Garage SalesLawn & GardenOpportunities

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    The Volunteer Center, a

    collaboration of RSVP

    and the United Way of

    Addison County, posts

    dozens of volunteer

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    Web. Go to www.

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    Loc a l age nc ie s c an pos t t he i r vo lun te e r ne e ds w i t h The Vo lun te e r Ce n te r by c a l l i ng RSVP at 388-7044.

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    JKNHakgf[]Y_Yafg^^]jaf_99JHkLYp9a\]Hjg%_jYe&AJK%ljYaf]\ngdmfl]]jkoaddhj]hYj]klYl]Yf\^]\]jYdaf[ge]lYpj]lmjfkYf\Yfko]jlYpim]klagfk ^gj dgo% Yf\ eg\]jYl]%af[ge] j]ka%\]flkg^9\\akgf;gmflq&Kh][aYdYll]flagfoaddZ]_an]flgl`gk]Y_]\.(Yf\gd\]j&;gehml]jYkkaklYf[]oaddYdkgZ]YnYadYZd] lgh]ghd]o`goYfl lg ^ad] ]d][ljgfa[Yddq mkaf_ ^j]] lYp kg^l%oYj]&JKNHngdmfl]]jkoaddZ]YnYadYZd]Ylkal]kl`jgm_`gml l`][gmflq& ;YddmkYl+00%/(,, lgeYc]YfYhhgafle]fllg\Yq

    Liz Lowry, of Waltham, is the won-derful new Bone Builders Instructor at the Armory Senior Center. Every Tuesday and Thursday, she leads an enthusiastic class of 12-14 women who gather to im-prove their strength, work on their bal-ance and have fun! Liz has volunteered in several other capacities, including singing at the Vergennes Residential Care Home, helping out at the Addison County Field Days, and tutoring both children at the Addison Central School and adults in math. Liz explains: I enjoy working with people, and helping them become comfortable with complicated conceptsand I love leading Bone Builders! Thank you for volunteering, Liz.

    Services ServicesServices ServicesServices Services

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  • CLASSIFIEDSAddison Independent

    Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 31

    ServicesC&I DRYWALL. Hanging, taping and skim coat plas-tering. Also tile. Call Joe 802-234-5545.

    CHAIN SAW SHARPENING 802-759-2095.

    CONSTRUCTION: ADDI-TIONS, RENOVATIONS, new construction, drywall, carpentry, painting, flooring, roofing. All aspects of construction, also property maintenance. Steven Fifield 802-989-0009.

    FREELANCE GRAPHIC DE-SIGNER offering reasonable rates for work in Adobe Pho-toshop and InDesign, Custom Clip Art, Logos and Artwork. Basic tutorial in photoshop and indesign. Great references. $15 / hour or by contract. No job too small. Email: freelance.mdesign@gmail.com or call 483-6428.

    LOCAL HOUSE CLEAN-ING: Honest, reliable and efficient cleaning woman. Weekly, biweekly, or one shot deals. References supplied. 802-349-5757.

    FreeFREE RABB I T MA -NURE! Please call Mo at 802-349-8040.

    Help WantedBANKRUPTCY: Call to find out if bankruptcy can help you. Kathleen Walls, Esq. 388-1156.

    BOISE CITGO is looking for a Part Time Secretary. Computer skills and Quickbook experi-ence a plus. Pay depending on experience. Call Boise Citgo after 11am, 802-758-2361.

    DRIVERS: CDL-B: Great Pay, Hometime! No-Forced Dispatch! New singles from Plat tsburgh, NY. Pass-port / Enhanced License req. www.truckmovers.com 888-567-4861.

    GREENHOUSE WORKERS WANTED. Part time seasonal. First Season Greenhouses. Call 5pm-6pm, 475-2588.

    HIRING CARE GIVERS for 11pm-7am shift. Email your re-sume and references to info@livingwellvt.org .

    GRAZE IS GROWING and needs permanent, part time kitchen help to assist our chef in food production. Cooking experience is preferred, atten-tion to detail while working in a fast paced energetic environ-ment is a must. Individuals with AM availability Thursday and Saturday and some flex-ibility. Send resumes to allen@grazemeals.com .

    WORK IN VERMONT FOR 4 YEARS!

    Find that perfect job or exceptional employee in our FODVVLHGV6XEPLW\RXUFODVVLHGVRQOLQHDWwwww.addisonindependent.com

    or call 388-4944

    A Good Deal.

    HELP WANTED

    WORK WANTED

    VERMONT FOR 4 YEARS!Country Home Products, Inc., worldwide marketer of DR brand of outdoor power equipment, is looking for Seasonal Customer Service Professionals to staff our busy inbound call center at our Vergennes, Vermont, facility.IF YOU POSSESS solid computer skills, enjoy working in a fast-paced, dynamic environment and are a proven problem solver, then CHP wants to hear from you. SHUKRXUSOXVSDLGLQFHQWLYHSURJUDPV+RXUVDUHSULPDULO\GD\VZLWKWKHRFFDVLRQDOHDUO\evening or Saturday.

    If you enjoy working in a challenging yet fun environ-ment, we want to hear from you! Please apply to: https://home.eease.adp.com/recruit/?id=3134251

    VERMONT FOR 4 YEARS!

    Please apply in person1137 Rte 7 North, Middlebury, VT

    (802)388-4482

    Mountain View Equipment of Middlebury, LLCLooking for

    Service Technicians1 plus years experience in agricultural equipment.

    3URFLHQWNQRZOHGJHLQPHFKDQLFDOHOHFWULFDODQGK\GUDXOLFV\VWHPVClean drivers license. Tools required.

    Help Wanted Help Wanted

    Help Wanted

    Help Wanted

    Help Wanted

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    Help Wanted

    Help WantedHelp Wanted

  • CLASSIFIEDSAddison Independent

    PAGE 32 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    PART TIME CAREGIVER for 12 year old disabled boy, Middlebury. Applicants must have child care experience, references, incredible pa-tience, a strong back. Flex-ible hours. Criminal back-ground check. Send resume: sstone7716@gmail.com .

    BAKER: MIDDLEBURY NATURAL Foods Co-op is seeking a baker with profes-sional baking experience who values natural foods. Ideal candidate is able to multi-task and work well as part of a team. Part-time year round position 24 hrs / wk. Great work environment, generous store discount and benefits. Complete application online at www.middleburycoop.com or in our store at 9 Washing-ton Street in Middlebury.

    COMMUNITY SERVICES MANAGER for independent living program. Assist individ-uals with developmental dis-abilities in obtaining housing, applying for and maintaining benefits, managing finances and meeting personal goals. Excellent communication skills and personal bound-aries required. Assist with strengthening autonomy in all aspects of the individuals life. Ideal candidate should have experience support-ing individuals with devel-opmental and mental health diagnoses. Good driving re-cord and Associates Degree required. Comprehensive benefit package including on-site gym membership. Respond to CSAC HR, 89 Main Street, Middlebury, VT 05753, 802-388-6751, ext. 425, or visit www.csac-vt.org .

    RESP ITE PROV IDER NEEDED for 21 year old woman after school hours and some weekends, prefer-ably in Vergennes or nearby area. With the right match this position could turn into a Developmental Home Pro-vider position by summer as she will be needing a home. She enjoys music, movies, walking, taking rides, arts and crafts, and hav-ing tea. Experience work-ing with people who have developmental disabilities and behavioral management skills preferred. Call Paula Dougherty at Community Associates 802-388-4021.

    SHARED LIVING PRO-VIDER: Young man with a developmental disability in his 30s seeking a home in Bristol area. Ideal would be a couple with no children or older children. He enjoys lis-tening to music, going out for coffee, lunch and other social activities. Support needed in learning independent living skills. He would benefit from structured home environ-ment. Behavioral manage-ment skills a plus. Generous annual tax-free stipend of $28,000 plus room and board payment of around $7200, as well as respite budget. Call Rocky Fucile at Community Associates at 802-388-4021.

    SERVER. EXPERIENCED SERVER for part or full time, year round position. Attention to detail, great communica-tion skills and enthusiasm required. Passion for local food and farm to table cuisine beneficial. 2-4 dinner shifts per week including weekends and holidays. For interview call Doug at Marys Restau-rant at The Inn at Baldwin Creek. 802-453-2432.

    BRIDPORT: JUST $100 / MONTH to share a comfort-able home, with nice views and gardens. In exchange, provide cooking 4-5 meals / week, light housekeeping, and some companionship for a senior who enjoys the outdoors and conversation. Private bath. Pets negotiable. 802-863-5625 for an applica-tion. Interview, references and background check re-quired. www.HomeShareV-ermont.org. EHO

    EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT: Help individuals with devel-opmental disabilities achieve occupational growth through skill development and so-cial interactions with on-site support. Ability to work ef-fectively in the public eye with local business owners and front line supervisors is necessary. Flexibility with schedule, GED, good driving record and use of personal vehicle required. 37.5 hours / week at $11.74 / hour with comprehensive benefits. Re-spond to CSAC HR, 89 Main St., Middlebury, VT 05753, (802) 388-6751 EXT. 425 or visit www.csac-vt.org .

    For SaleBRAND NEW QUEEN mat-tress and matching box spring, both waranteed. Still in factory-sealed plastic. Can help with delivery. $145. Call 802-557-0675.

    MOS COUNTRY RABBITS: Fresh Rabbit Meat for sale. Average weight: 4-5 lbs. Charging $14.00 per rabbit. Also selling live adult rab-bits, as well as baby rabbits for negotiable price. Many different breeds including Giants. May be seen by ap-pointment. Call Mo OKeefe at 802-349-8040. Great Meat. Great Pets. Great Prices.

    BULK SALT AND salted sand; loaded or delivered. Livingston Farm Landscape. 802-453-2226.

    MATTRESS, TWO PIECE Queen set, new in plastic. Can deliver. First come, f i rs t serve. $150. Cal l 802-557-0675.

    OUTBOARD MOTORS: An-tique and small outboards. Cleaning out shop, winter prices. 802-453-4235.

    THE BARREL MAN: 55 gal-lon Plastic and Metal barrels. Several types: 55 gallon rain barrels with faucets, Food grade with removable locking covers, plastic food grade with spin-on covers (pickle barrels). Many types of bar-rels including 275 gallon food grade totes. 55 gallon salt / sand barrels PT legs. Deliv-ery available. 802-453-4235.

    For Rent2 BEDROOM UPSTAIRS apartment. $1145 / mo. In-cludes electricity, hot wa-ter, heat, rubbish removal. No pets. Security deposit. 802-453-4037.

    4000 SQUARE FEET or less. Professional Office space in Middlebury, multi- room, re-ceptionist desk. Ground level, parking, handicapped-ac-cessible. Available now. 802-558-6092.

    BRANDON 2 BR $650 + utilities. 802-773-9107 www.thefuccicompany.com .

    BRANDON 3BR APART-MENT Private entryway, full bath, carpetted bedrooms, laundry hook-up, basement / storage, desirable parking. $940, heat, w&s included. 802-352-4700.

    BRANDON; PR IVATE, GROUND f loor, 4 room apartment. Newly reno-vated. $800 / mo. includes heat. References, deposit. No pets. No smoking. Call Kathy 802-352-4302.

    BRIDPORT; 1 BEDROOM, bath and 4-room apartment with porch / lawn. Washer / dryer, heat / hot water includ-ed. No smoking, no pets. References. $775 / month plus security deposit. Only living unit in building. For more info, David 802-758-2546.

    BRISTOL 2 BEDROOM Mo-bile home, located in small, clean park. 802-453-4027, Reg or Brenda.

    BR I S TO L CO T TAGE HOUSEMATE: Charming! Fully furnished. Private bed-room with attached living room. No pets, non-smoking. $700 / month. Share utilities. 1 mile from village. Call 802-363-4789.

    BRISTOL LARGE DOUBLE Wide in small clean park. 4 bedrooms, 2 full bath. Recently remodeled, new carpets. Inc ludes mas-ter suite with private bath. 802-453-427, Reg or Brenda.

    BRISTOL LARGE ONE bed-room apartment. Walking distance to town. No pets. No smoking. $700 / month and utilities and deposit. Call 802-388-0730.

    BRISTOL, LARGE ONE / PLUS Bedroom Apt. Effi-cient gas heat, includes water and sewer, no pets / smoking, $700 plus electric and heat, call Tom at Wallace Realty. 802-453-4670.

    TECHNICIAN WANTEDDrinking Water Service Technician to service & install water softeners &

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eth at beth@vermontwater.com

    Its against the law to discriminate when advertising housing related activities.

    Particularly on sites like Craigslist.

    And its easier to break the law than you might think. You cant say no children or adults only. There is lots you cant say. The federal government is watching for such discrimination.

    Let us help you sift through the complexities of the Fair Housing Law. Stay legal. Stay on the right side of the nations Fair Housing Law.

    Call the Addison Independent at (802) 388-4944.Talk to our sales professionals.

    MECHANICJP Carrara & Sons is looking for an experi-

    enced diesel mechanic for our North Clarendon location. Must be able to diagnose, adjust, repair, maintain, and overhaul trucks, front end loaders, and excavators, as well as inspect, adjust, repair, and replace all types of brake systems, steering mechanisms, wheel bearings, and other impor-tant parts. Applicants should have a current CDL license, class A preferred. Welding experience a must. The position will require extended hours and responsibility for all types of maintenance ZRUN %HQHWV LQFOXGH PHGLFDO SURW VKDULQJand 401k. Please send resume to:

    J.P. CarraraP.O. Box 60, N. Clarendon, VT 05759

    email to jpcarrara@aol.com or call 802-775-2301.

    DR Power Equipment, the worldwide marketer of the DR brand of outdoor power equipment, is seeking a Part-Time(25 hours per week) Retail Sales and Service Associate for our factory storein Vergennes, VT. MUST HAVE good mechanical aptitude and computer skills, and be able to lift 50 pounds.Knowledge of outdoor power equipment is a plus. Please apply to: https://home.eease.adp.com/recruit/?id=3732011

    VOTED ONE OF THE BESTPLACES TO WORK IN

    VERMONT FOR 4 YEARS!

    TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORRutland Northeast Supervisory Union seeks a highly knowledgeable individual with excellent communication and collaboration skills to lead the direction and maintenance of technology systems and integration in support of 21st Century educational practices and outcomes. 4XDOLHGFDQGLGDWHVPXVWKDYHPLQLPXPRIYH\HDUVRIH[SHULHQFHLQHGXFDWLRQRUWKHHOGRILQIRUPDWLRQWHFKQRORJ\$0DVWHUVdegree and Educational Technology Specialist endorsement preferred. This is a full year SRVLWLRQZLWKFRPSHWLWLYHVDODU\DQGEHQHWVThe selection process will begin immediately LQDQWLFLSDWLRQRIDQHDUO\0DUFKVWDUWLQJGDWHIf interested, send letter of interest, resume and references to:

    John A. CastleSuperintendent of SchoolsRutland Northeast SU

    49 Court DriveBrandon, VT 057333RVLWLRQLVRSHQXQWLOOOHG

    EOE

    Check the Classifieds twice a week in the Addison Independent.

    Buy! Sell! Find!

    Help Wanted

    Help Wanted

    Help Wanted For Sale

    Help Wanted Help WantedHelp Wanted

    For Rent For Rent

  • CLASSIFIEDSAddison Independent

    Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 33

    BR I S TOL : 2 B ED -ROOM, quiet building. Lease, references, credit check. No pets. $625 / mo. 802-453-3712.

    BRISTOL; 2 BEDROOM apartment ready for oc-cupancy. 3 miles from village stop light in nice community neighborhood. Call 802-453-4207, Reg or Brenda.

    EAST MIDDLEBURY: 1 bedroom apartment includes heat, hot water, electric-ity, rubbish / recycle; walk to post office and local stores. No pets. References and deposit. Call 802-388-7716.

    MIDDLEBURY 1 BED-ROOM apartment near downtown. Appliances, lease, security deposit. No pets. Real-Net Manage-ment, Inc. 802-388-4994.

    MIDDLEBURY OFFICE SPACE: Ground floor Court St. location. Off street park-ing. 600 to 2,000 sq. ft. Re-al-Net Management, Inc. 802-388-4994.

    MIDDLEBURY; 3 BED-ROOM apartment. All in-clusive, $1700 / mo. All new. Available April. 388-4831.

    MIDDLEBURY; EXCEP-TIONAL BRAND new, sec-ond floor studio with full kitchen and bath. Includes: heat, hw, electric, trash, washer / dryer. $1075 / mo. No pets or smoking. Call Karen at Lang McLaughry Real Estate. 802-388-1977.

    NEW HAVEN 2 Bedroom apartment available Febru-ary 1. No smoking, no pets. Heat and electric, rubbish removal, snow removal included. Car port. $850 / month. Security deposit and first month rent. References. 802-989-9117.

    NEW HAVEN; EXCELLENT 2 bedroom apartment. Large with all appliances; also heat included. $800 / mo. 802-453-2184.

    RIPTON TWO bedroom sec-ond floor apartment with deck, 600s.f. $650 / month plus utilities. No pets. No smoking. Call 382-8567.

    ROOM FOR RENT in Bridport. All utilities in-cluded. Washer, dryer, all kitchen privileges. Avail-able February 15. $550 / month. 802-758-913 or 802-282-6935.

    RV, BOAT AND HEATED MOTORCYCLE STOR-AGE Ava i l ab le . Ca l l 802-453-5563.

    SELF-STORAGE, 8X10 units. Your lock and key, $50 / month. Middlebury. 802-558-6092.

    TWO- BAY GARAGE, de-posit, references. Middle-bury. 802-558-6092.

    WEEKLY RENTALS AVA I L A B L E . C o n -tact 802-388-4091 and 802-388-4935.

    WEYBRIDGE; 1 BED-ROOM furnished cottage 2 miles from Middlebury. Great view, screened porch, washer, dryer, dishwasher. Pets ok. $850 / mo. plus utili-ties. References, deposit. ihwashington@gmavt.net .

    Wood HeatCORNWALL, VT: WELL Seasoned 3x5 diameter, 16 inch length firewood. Mostly hardhack. $300. per cord. You pick up $245 cash. Get it while it lasts. 802-462-3313.

    DRY FIREWOOD. ALL hard-wood. $250 / cord; cut, split, delivered. 802-352-1034, 802-349-5457.

    DRY FIREWOOD. CUT, sp l i t and de l i ve red . 802-388-7300.

    FIREWOOD, cut, split and delivered. Green or sea-soned. Call Tom Shepard at 453-4285.

    MOUNTAIN ROAD FIRE-WOOD: 50 cords dry hard-wood for sale. Call for price. 802-759-2095.

    Real Estate6.8 ACRES HILLSIDE land in Salisbury. Beautiful southwesterly exposures and sunsets. Secluded site. Right of way to land in place; includes water and power easements. New town assessment $36,900. Cash price $25,000. Seri-ous inquiries only please. 802-352-6678.

    FARM FOR SALE: Rt 116 in Bristol. 349 acres, 1810 farmhouse, 2 sheds. 40 ac tillable. 300 ac woodland. Restricted by easement and option to purchase at ag value. Vermont Land Trust seeks buyers who will farm commercially. $190,000. Contact Jon Ramsay at 802-533-7705 or jramsay@vlt.org or www.vlt.org / farr .

    Att. Farmers145 ACRES AVAILABLE for five year lease. Organic preferred. $5500 per year. First and last year rent paid at signing of contract. 619-208-2939. www.land-woodwater.com .

    HAY FOR SALE: Small square bales. First cut, second cut, and mulch. Delivery available. Call for pricing. 802-453-4481, 8 0 2 - 3 4 9 - 9 2 8 1 , o r 802-989-1004.

    HAY FOR SALE; first and second cut. Call 352-4686.

    SAWDUST; STORED AND undercover. Large tandem silage truck $600, delivered. Large single axle dump $250, delivered. Single axle dump $185, delivered. Pick up also available. Phone order and credit cards ac-cepted. 802-453-2226.

    CarsFREE JUNK CAR RE-MOVAL. Cash paid for some complete cars. Call 388-0432 or 388-2209.

    SUVs

    2003 JEEP LIBERTY: Green, 105,508 miles. Re-cently refurbished. $3500 OBO. 802-349-6874.

    Trucks

    1998 FORD RANGER XLT, super cab, white. 4x4, 4 liter V-6. Automatic transmis-sion. 102,500 miles. Call 802-758-2377 for informa-tion.

    WantedWANTED TO BUY 1 item or houseful. Also old books. Call Blue Willow Antiques. 802-247-5333.

    WANTED: TWO THREE drawer single file cabinets. Good, clean condition. Call Pam at 802-388-4944.

    CITY OF VERGENNESNOTICE OF AVAILABILITY

    AUDITORS REPORTNotice is hereby given to the residents

    and voters of the City of Vergennes that WKHDXGLWRUVUHSRUWDQGQGLQJVLQZULWLQJDUHDYDLODEOHRQWKH&LW\VZHEVLWHZZZ9HUJHQQHVRUJRUFDQEHREWDLQHGDWWKH&LW\&OHUNVRIFH 2/4

    TOWN OF SHOREHAMNOTICE OF

    PUBLIC HEARINGThe Zoning Board of Adjustment will

    hold a public hearing on Tuesday, Feb-ruary 19 2013 at 7 pm at the Shoreham Firehouse to consider the application (#13-3) from Whistle Pig, LLC of 2139 Quiet Valley Road for the conversion of an existing dairy barn to a rye whiskey GLVWLOOHU\DQGRIFHVSDFH7KHDSSOLFDQWis also requesting to build a 50x90 stor-DJHEDUQRQWKHVDPHSURSHUW\7KHDS-plication is available for inspection at the 7RZQRIFH3DUWLFLSDWLRQLQWKLVSURFHHG-ing is a prerequisite to the right to make DQ\VXEVHTXHQWDSSHDO Bill Telgen, Chair

    1/31, 2/4

    STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CIVIL DIVISIONAddison Unit Docket No. 188-6-08 AncvTHE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J2 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-J2 Plaintiff v.DAVID M. ROWLES; ASAH ROWLES; Defendants

    NOTICE OF SALE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by David M. Rowles and Asah Rowles to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for MSA Mortgage, LLC dated July 21, 2005 and recorded in Book 35 at Page 639 of the City/Town of Granville Land Records, of which mortgage the undersigned is the present holder by Assignment of Mortgage recorded on June 26, 2008 in Book 38 at Page 6, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 12:00 p.m. on February 18, 2013 at 95 Harpers Way, Granville, VT 05747 all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To Wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to David M. Rowles by Quit Claim Deed of Duncan Rowles dated July 20, 2005, and about to be recorded in the Granville Land Records, and more particularly described as follows: Being a certain parcel of land of 17 acres, more or less, with the dwelling house and other improvements thereon, located at 95 Harpers Way in the Town of Granville, Vermont, and depicted on a survey entitled Harperville Properties Building Lots, Granville, Vermont the Base Map based on a 1986 6XUYH\E\1RUPDQ56PLWK,QFDVPRGLHGE\1RUPDQ$UVHQHDXOW2FWREHUDQGrecorded in Map Book 3, page 31 of the Granville Land Records, which are all and the same lands and premises conveyed to David M. Rowles and Duncan Rowles by Warranty Deed of William J. Hutchins dated March 8, 2002, recorded in Book 21, pages 616-617 of the Granville Land Records. Also being part of all and the same lands and premises conveyed to William J. Hutchins by Warranty Deed of Charlene Farr dated August 22, 2000, recorded LQ%RRNSDJHVRIWKH*UDQYLOOH/DQG5HFRUGV)RUDPRUHVSHFLFGHVFULSWLRQof the subject property, reference is made to the aforementioned deeds and plan and the records cited in them, and to all prior deeds and the records cited in them. Plaintiff may adjourn this Public Auction one or more times for a total time not exceeding 30 days, without further court order, and without publication or service of a new notice of sale, by announcement of the new sale date to those present at each adjournment. Terms RI6DOHWREHSDLGLQFDVKRUE\FHUWLHGFKHFNE\WKHSXUFKDVHUDWWKHWLPHRIVDOHZLWKWKHEDODQFHGXHDWFORVLQJ3URRIRIQDQFLQJIRUWKHEDODQFHRIWKHSXUFKDVHto be provided at the time of sale. The sale is subject to taxes due and owing to the Town of Granville. The Mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.7KH%DQNRI1HZ

  • PAGE 34 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS94 Main St., Middlebury, VT 05753

    Separate sealed BIDS for the construction of:South Street Improvements Project: Phase One will be received by The Town of

    Middlebury at 94 Main Street, Middlebury, VT 05753 until 11:00 am (prevailing local WLPHRQ7KXUVGD\)HEUXDU\DQGWKHQDWVDLGRIFHSXEOLFO\RSHQHGDQGUHDGaloud.(DFK%,'PXVWEHDFFRPSDQLHGE\DFHUWLHGFKHFNSD\DEOHWRWKH2:1(5IRUYH

    percent (5%) of the total amount of the BID. A BID bond may be used in lieu of a certi-HGFKHFN7KH&2175$&7'2&80(176PD\EHH[DPLQHGDWWKHIROORZLQJORFDWLRQV*UHHQ0RXQWDLQ(QJLQHHULQJ,QF6RXWK%URZQHOO5RDG:LOOLVWRQ977RZQRI0LGGOHEXU\3XEOLF:RUNV2IFHV6RXWK5W0LGGOHEXU\97:RUNVLQ3URJUHVV)DUUHOO6WUHHW6XLWH6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ97&RSLHV RI WKH&2175$&7'2&80(176PD\ EH REWDLQHG DW WKH RIFH RI*UHHQ0RXQWDLQ(QJLQHHULQJ,QFORFDWHGDW6RXWK%URZQHOO5RDG:LOOLVWRQ97upon payment of $150.00 for each set.$*XDUDQW\%21'D3HUIRUPDQFH%21'DQGD3D\PHQW%21'HDFKLQDQDPRXQW

    equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, will be required. )HGHUDOPLQLPXPZDJHUDWHVDQGSXEOLFZRUNHPSOR\PHQWODZVDUHDSSOLFDEOH$Q\%,''(5XSRQUHWXUQLQJWKH&2175$&7'2&80(176ZLWKLQGD\VDIWHUWKH

    actual date of BID opening and in good condition, will be refunded the payment, and any QRQELGGHUXSRQVRUHWXUQLQJWKH&2175$&7'2&80(176ZLOOEHUHIXQGHGA pre-bid conference for prospective bidders will be held at the Municipal2IFH%XLOGLQJORFDWHGDW0DLQ6WLQ0LGGOHEXU\DWDPRQ)HE5HSUHVHQWDWLYHVRI*UHHQ0RXQWDLQ(QJLQHHULQJDQGWKH7RZQRI0LGGOHEXU\ZLOOEH

    present to answer questions from bidders and discuss participation requirements.January 23, 2013

    .DWKOHHQ5DPVD\7RZQ0DQDJHU1/28, 31, 2/4

    ADDISON NORTHWEST SUPERVISORY UNIONNOTICE TO ALL STUDENTS IN GRADES 8-11

    PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL CHOICE Vergennes Union High School, along with all other Vermont high schools, will participate in ZKDWKDVEHHQWHUPHGDVWDWHZLGHV\VWHPRIKLJKVFKRROFKRLFH,QLWVLQLWLDOFRQJXUDWLRQLPSOHPHQWDWLRQZLOOHVVHQWLDOO\EHDPRGLHGYHUVLRQRIWKHUHJLRQDOFKRLFHWKDWKDVEHHQin place since 2002. 8QGHUWKLVPRGLHGSODQVWXGHQWVIURP98+6PD\DSSO\WRWUDQVIHUWRDQ\RWKHUKLJKVFKRRO LQ WKH VWDWH )RU WKH VFKRRO \HDU WKHPD[LPXPQXPEHU RI VWXGHQWVHOLJLEOHWRWUDQVIHULVOLPLWHGWRWHQ7KHDFWXDOQXPEHUZLOOGHSHQGRQWKHQXPEHURIVWXGHQWVVHOHFWHGLQSULRU\HDUVWRFRQWLQXHWKHLUHQUROOPHQWDWRWKHUDUHDKLJKVFKRROV To apply to participate in the program for the 2013-2014 school year (grades 9-12): &RPSOHWHDQDSSOLFDWLRQDYDLODEOHIURPWKH98+6JXLGDQFHRIFHRUIURPWKH6XSHULQWHQGHQWVRIFHDVRI)HEUXDU\

    $OODSSOLFDWLRQVPXVWEHVLJQHGE\DSDUHQWRUJXDUGLDQ File the application no later than March 1, 2013.

    1RWLFDWLRQRIGHFLVLRQVWRDOOVWXGHQWVZKRKDYHDSSOLHGWRSDUWLFLSDWHZLOOEHSURYLGHGQRlater than April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

    +++++++++++++++UD#3 School Board Meeting

    Middlebury Union Middle School Learning Center

    7XHV)HE30

    2/4

    Call to OrderComments and Questions from Visitors and Members of the Community Approve Minutes of Jan. 14, 2013 Act on Bills Reports:

    A. Students B. Principals C. Superintendent D. Board

    School Choice Parameters Act on Facilities Committee Recom-mendation on Lighting Proposal Prepare for Annual Meeting on February 26, 2013 Executive Session: Contract Negotiations 2013-2014 Teacher Contract 5DWLFDWLRQ Items for Future Meetings Adjournment

    AGENDA

    VERGENNES-PANTON WATER DISTRICTBOND SALE NOTICE

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    Public Notices appear Mon. & Thurs. in the

    Addison Independent

    BY VIRGINIA BARLOWIn the old days, ladybeetles (or ODG\EXJV XVHG WR \ DZD\ KRPHto their children, as per the old nurs-HU\ UK\PH 1RZ RQH VSHFLHV WKH+DOORZHHQ ODG\EHHWOH LV LQVWHDG\LQJ LQWR RXU KRPHV LQ GURYHVZKHUH LWV EDG RGRU DQGhabit of falling into cups RI FRIIHH KDYH FRQWULE-XWHG WR LWV GUDPDWLF IDOOIURPJUDFH7KH ODG\EHHWOH IDPLO\LQFOXGHV PDQ\ FXWH DQGshiny beetles theyre XVXDOO\ EULJKW RUDQJH RU UHG ZLWKVRPHEODFNDQGZKLWH WKURZQLQIRUFRQWUDVW$VDJURXSWKH\VSHFLDOL]HLQFRQVXPLQJDJULFXOWXUDOSHVWVHVSH-cially aphids, and they dont sting or ELWH7KHVHDWWULEXWHVDQGWKHIDFWWKDWWKHUHDUHVRPDQ\RI WKHPDERXWVSHFLHVZRUOGZLGHDQGDURXQG LQ WKH86KDYHFRQWULEXWHGWR PDNLQJ ODG\EHHWOHV DPRQJ WKHPRVWEHORYHGRIDOOWKHLQVHFWV

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    not long after the +DOORZHHQVDUULYHG:LQHPDNHUV UHDOO\KDWH +DOORZHHQladybeetles because not only do they eat the grapes, but those WKDW JHW KDUYHVWHGZLWK WKH JUDSHVSURGXFH D PRVWXQSOHDVDQWDYRU LQ

    WKHZLQH7KLVODG\EHHWOHKDVUHFHQWO\PDGHLWVZD\WRWKH8.DQGVRPHVFLHQWLVWV EHOLHYH WKDW QDWLYHspecies there could disappear if the QHZEHHWOHRXULVKHV+DOORZHHQ ODG\EHHWOHV DUH D ELWODUJHUWKDQPRVWRIRXUQDWLYHVSHFLHVZKLFKPD\KHOSH[SODLQWKHLUVXFFHVV'HSHQGLQJRQ WKHVL]HRI WKHDSKLGDODG\EHHWOHZLOOHDWIURPWRDSKLGV GXULQJ LWV ODUYDO VWDJH 7KH

    EHHWOHV XVXDOO\ SURGXFH WZR EURRGVeach year, and in the laboratory, ZKHUHLWVSRVVLEOHWRFRXQWIHPDOHVHDFK ODLG DQ DYHUDJH RI HJJV$OOODG\EHHWOHVXVHGHIHQVLYHFKHPL-FDOVLQWKHLUKHPRO\PSKFLUFXODWRU\XLGWRGLVFRXUDJHZRXOGEHSUHGD-WRUV EXW WKH +DOORZHHQ KDV WKHVHIRXOWDVWLQJDQGVPHOOLQJFRPSRXQGVin higher concentrations than its UHODWLYHV1RERG\HDWV WKHPRU WKHLUHJJ RU WKHLU ODUYDH ,Q ZLQWHU WKH\PD[LPL]H WKH HIIHFWLYHQHVV RI WKHVHGHWHUUHQWV E\ JORPPLQJ WRJHWKHU LQJURXSV 7KH\ YDU\ LQ EHKDYLRU DQGPRUSKRORJ\DVZHOODVLQDSSHDUDQFHZKLFKDOORZVWKHPWRDGDSWWRFKDQJ-LQJHQYLURQPHQWDOFRQGLWLRQV

    Many introductions of the beetle KDYHEHHQPDGHVLQFHEXWWKHEHHWOHSRSXODWLRQVKRZHGQRVLJQRIWDNLQJRIIXQWLO1RRQHNQRZVZKDWPLJKWKDYHWULJJHUHGWKHSRSX-ODWLRQH[SORVLRQ2QFHDEHHWOHSRSXODWLRQEHFRPHVHVWDEOLVKHGWKHUDSLGLW\ZLWKZKLFKLWFRORQL]HVQHZWHUULWRU\LVDVWRXQG-LQJ ,Q RQO\ RQH RI WKHVHEHHWOHV ZDV IRXQG LQ 6ZLW]HUODQGDQG QRQHZHUH IRXQG LQ

  • Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013 PAGE 35

    February 4Puzzle Solutions

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    M O T E

    All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or persons receiv-ing public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.

    This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available

    on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina-tion, call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-424-8590. For the Washington, DC area please call HUD at 426-3500.

    EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

    Real EstateNow is a great time to buy!

    WALLACE REALTY48 Mountain Terrace

    Bristol, VT 054430( s FAX 802-453-5898

    Visit our websites at:www.wallacere.com

    www.greenbuiltvermont.com

    Kelly Claire TomPlease call Kelly, Claire, or Tom

    A U CTIONS

    MIDDLEBURY The Addison County Relocalization Network is hosting two Farm-to-School salons in February.7KHUVWZDVODVW:HGQHVGD\)HEDQGZDVFDOOHGWKH$GGLVRQ&RXQW\Farm-to-School Salon.Farm-to-School organizations are

    popping up around the state; partici-pants at this salon discussed how can people in Addison County work together so they are not reinventing the wheel? How can they encourage more people to get involved in Farm-WR6FKRRO KHUH DQG UHDS WKH EHQHWVfor themselves and their communities?

    7KLV VDORQ KHOG DW WKH$OWHUQDWLYH(GXFDWLRQ %XLOGLQJ VHUYHG DV DQinitial conversation between all inter-ested parties on the status of regional farm-to-school programs and useful collaborations going forward.The second salon is called Farm-

    to-School for the Preschool Child and ZLOOEHKHOG7KXUVGD\)HESPDW0DU\-RKQVRQ&KLOGUHQV&HQWHURQ:DWHU6WUHHWFarm-to-School is an exciting and JURZLQJ PRYHPHQW LQ WKH VWDWH EXWhow does this translate to the early HGXFDWLRQ VHWWLQJ" :KDW DUH WKHchallenges and opportunities for the

    pre-school child? Research has shown that the very

    early years are the most formative for how/if children develop healthy HDWLQJKDELWV:KDWFDQSHRSOHLQWKHcommunity do to foster this connec-tion at home and in school? The public is invited to come join in DSRWOXFNPHDOVWLPXODWLQJFRQYHUVD-WLRQDQGPHHWQHZSHRSOHSDVVLRQDWHabout this topic. RSVP for this salon to Amethyst at resource@mjccvt.org or 7KH)HEVDORQLVIUHHEXWSDUWLF-

    ipants are asked to bring a potluck dish to share.

    6+25(+$0 6KRUHKDPVFriends of the Platt Memorial /LEUDU\ZLOO KRVW D EHQHW FRQFHUWand maple dessert contest on 6DWXUGD\)HEIURPWRp.m. Music will be performed by the Addison County folk group Zephyr. This Americana music TXDUWHW EULQJV WRJHWKHU LQXHQFHVRI IRON EOXHJUDVV EOXHV JRVSHOcountry and the singer-songwriter tradition. Members of the band LQFOXGH0DWWKHZ'LFNHUVRQ6XVDQ1RS .DWKOHHQ 6PLWK DQG 'XWWRQSmith.A maple dessert contest and

    tasting will be held in conjunc-tion with the concert. Local cooks are invited to submit their favor-ite maple dessert (which must be made with Vermont maple syrup) to share with the public. The crowd will sample the desserts and vote for their favorites by making cash donations into the respective ballot boxes for each dessert item. All FDVK YRWHVZLOO EHQHW WKH)ULHQGVRI WKH 3ODWW 0HPRULDO /LEUDU\Vefforts to fund further renovations of the historic building. The creator of the most popular item will win

    the soon-to-be-sought-after Golden 6DS %XFNHW WURSK\ DV ZHOO DV Dgood share of bragging rights.The family-friendly event will

    offer free admission. A fundraising UDIH ZLOO EH KHOG $WWHQGHHV DUHasked to bring their appetites and plenty of cash for voting. The event ZLOOEHKHOGDWWKHOLEUDU\0DLQ6W6KRUHKDPShow off your talent and enter a

    maple dessert. Entries must include Vermont maple syrup and a recipe card. Entry forms are available at the library or at www.plattlib.org. For more information contact the OLEUDU\DWRUplatt@shore-ham.net 2U FRQWDFW -XG\ 6WHYHQVat or judystevens@VKRUHKDPQHWRU.DWKOHHQ+HVFRFNat or kathleenhes-cock@hotmail.com.

    Salons spread Farm-to-School tips

    Concert, maple dessert contest Feb. 9 to benefit Shoreham library

    Refurbished laptopsJEFF REHBACH TEACHES a class on Internet safety to Elizabeth

    Brown of Middlebury and Robin Bentley of Bristol, both owners of homes through the Habitat for Humanity program. The two home-owners got the computer through a Habitat International program that provides free refurbished laptops to Habitat for Humanity homeowners donated by Redemtech Inc.

  • PAGE 36 Addison Independent, Monday, February 4, 2013

    If youre not Sleeping, maybe youre doing it wrong.

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