Sonnet Sonnet About sonnet About sonnet About sonnet About sonnet Brief History about sonnet Brief History about sonnet Brief History about sonnet Brief.

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Slide 1 Sonnet Sonnet About sonnet About sonnet About sonnet About sonnet Brief History about sonnet Brief History about sonnet Brief History about sonnet Brief History about sonnet Shakespearean Sonnet Shakespearean Sonnet Shakespearean Sonnet Shakespearean Sonnet Slide 2 About sonnet About sonnet Form of poetry, has 14 lines with a specific rhyme scheme Form of poetry, has 14 lines with a specific rhyme scheme Topic of sonnets written in Shakespeare's time is love-- or a theme related to love Topic of sonnets written in Shakespeare's time is love-- or a theme related to love usually written as part of a series, with each sonnet a sequel to the previous one, although many sonnets could stand alone as separate poems. usually written as part of a series, with each sonnet a sequel to the previous one, although many sonnets could stand alone as separate poems. Slide 3 Brief history of sonnet The sonnet originated in Sicily in the 13th Century with Giacomo da Lentino (1188-1240), a lawyer. The poetic traditions of the Provenal region of France apparently influenced him, but he wrote his poems in the Sicilian dialect of Italian. Some authorities credit another Italian, Guittone d'Arezzo (1230- 1294), with originating the sonnet. The English word "Sonnet" comes from the Italian word "sonetto," meaning "little song." Some early sonnets were set to music, with accompaniment provided by a lute. The sonnet originated in Sicily in the 13th Century with Giacomo da Lentino (1188-1240), a lawyer. The poetic traditions of the Provenal region of France apparently influenced him, but he wrote his poems in the Sicilian dialect of Italian. Some authorities credit another Italian, Guittone d'Arezzo (1230- 1294), with originating the sonnet. The English word "Sonnet" comes from the Italian word "sonetto," meaning "little song." Some early sonnets were set to music, with accompaniment provided by a lute. Slide 4 Brief Introduction of Sonnet The Italian poet Petrarch (1304- 1374), a Roman Catholic priest, popularized the sonnet. The Italian poet Petrarch (1304- 1374), a Roman Catholic priest, popularized the sonnet. The format of Petrarch's sonnets differs from that of Shakespeare. Petrarch's sonnets each consist of an eight-line stanza (octave) and a six-line stanza (sestet). The first stanza presents a theme, and the second stanza develops it. The rhyme scheme is as follows: The format of Petrarch's sonnets differs from that of Shakespeare. Petrarch's sonnets each consist of an eight-line stanza (octave) and a six-line stanza (sestet). The first stanza presents a theme, and the second stanza develops it. The rhyme scheme is as follows: (1) first stanza (octave): ABBA, ABBA; (1) first stanza (octave): ABBA, ABBA; (2) second stanza (sestet): CDE, CDE. (2) second stanza (sestet): CDE, CDE. Slide 5 Sonnet Came to England The sonnet form was introduced in England by Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503- 1542) and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517-1547). They translated Italian sonnets into English and wrote sonnets of their own. Surrey introduced blank verse into the English language in his translation of the Aeneid of Vergil. Wyatt and Surrey sometimes replaced Petrarch's scheme of an eight-line stanza and a six-line stanza with three four-line stanzas and a two-line conclusion known as a couplet. Shakespeare adopted the latter scheme in his sonnets. The sonnet form was introduced in England by Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503- 1542) and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1517-1547). They translated Italian sonnets into English and wrote sonnets of their own. Surrey introduced blank verse into the English language in his translation of the Aeneid of Vergil. Wyatt and Surrey sometimes replaced Petrarch's scheme of an eight-line stanza and a six-line stanza with three four-line stanzas and a two-line conclusion known as a couplet. Shakespeare adopted the latter scheme in his sonnets. Slide 6 Shakespearean Sonnets William Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, among which he addresses Sonnets 1 through 126 to an unidentified young man with outstanding physical and intellectual attributes. In Sonnets 127 through 154, Shakespeare devotes most of his attention to addressing a mysterious "dark lady". William Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, among which he addresses Sonnets 1 through 126 to an unidentified young man with outstanding physical and intellectual attributes. In Sonnets 127 through 154, Shakespeare devotes most of his attention to addressing a mysterious "dark lady". Slide 7 The rhyming pattern The Shakespearean sonnet (also called the English sonnet) has three four-line stanzas (quatrains) and a two-line unit called a couplet. A couplet is always indented; both lines rhyme at the end. ABAB CDCD EFEF GG The Shakespearean sonnet (also called the English sonnet) has three four-line stanzas (quatrains) and a two-line unit called a couplet. A couplet is always indented; both lines rhyme at the end. ABAB CDCD EFEF GGShakespearean sonnet Shakespearean sonnet The meter of Shakespeare's sonnets is iambic pentameter (except in Sonnet 145). The rhyming lines in each stanza are the first and third and the second and fourth. In the couplet ending the poem, both lines rhyme. All of Shakespeare's sonnets follow the same rhyming pattern The meter of Shakespeare's sonnets is iambic pentameter (except in Sonnet 145). The rhyming lines in each stanza are the first and third and the second and fourth. In the couplet ending the poem, both lines rhyme. All of Shakespeare's sonnets follow the same rhyming pattern iambic pentameter iambic pentameter Slide 8 Iambic Pentameter Shakespeare wrote his sonnets (and many of the lines in his plays) in iambic pentameter, Shakespeare wrote his sonnets (and many of the lines in his plays) in iambic pentameter, a technical term for a poetry pattern in which each line has 10 syllables, beginning with an unstressed syllable and a stressed syllable, followed by another pair of unstressed and stressed syllables, and so on--until there are five pairs of syllables (or ten syllables in all). a technical term for a poetry pattern in which each line has 10 syllables, beginning with an unstressed syllable and a stressed syllable, followed by another pair of unstressed and stressed syllables, and so on--until there are five pairs of syllables (or ten syllables in all). But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? Slide 9 Sonnet 18 Quatrain 1 (four-line stanza) Quatrain 1 (four-line stanza) A Shall I compare thee to a summers Day? B Thou art more lovely and more temper ATE : A Rough winds do shake the darling buds of MAY, B And summer's lease hath all too short a DATE : Slide 10 Sonnet 18 Quatrain 2 (four-line stanza) Quatrain 2 (four-line stanza) C Sometime too hot the eye of heaven SHINES, D And often is his gold complexion DIMM'D; C And every fair from fair sometime de CLINES, D By chance or nature's changing course un TRIMM'D; Slide 11 Sonnet 18 Quatrain 3 (four-line stanza) E But thy eternal summer shall not FADE, F Nor lose possession of that fair thou OWEST, E Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his SHADE, F When in eternal lines to time thou GROWEST ; Slide 12 Couplet (two rhyming lines) Couplet (two rhyming lines) G So long as men can breathe,or eyes can SEE; G So long lives this, and this gives life to THEE. Slide 13 Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summers day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summers lease hath all too short a date; And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance or natures changing course untrimmed; But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou owst, Nor shall death brag thou wand rest in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou growst. So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. Slide 14 Thank You Thank You --presented by --presented by Zhong Zhirong Zhong Zhirong

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