The 2010 Gross National Happiness Index : Part II

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Centre for Bhutan Studies. The 2010 Gross National Happiness Index : Part II. The Centre for Bhutan Studies 2011. Centre for Bhutan Studies. Part II: Understanding Happiness National happiness Happiness by Dzongkhag Happiness by region Happiness by gender Happiness by age group - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Slide 1The 2010 Gross National Happiness Index : Part IIThe Centre for Bhutan Studies2011. Centre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan Studies A person who has achieved sufficiency in at least 6 of the 9 domains of GNH is classified as HAPPYCentre for Bhutan StudiesHow is happiness measured?40.8% of Bhutanese are classified happy after applying sufficiency and happy threshold.The value for GNH Index 2010 is 0.743Centre for Bhutan Studies.Centre for Bhutan Studies.Indicator: Consumption per capitaDomains: Health, Education and Living StandardsDomains: Psychological wellbeing, Health, Time use, Culture, Ecology, Community vitality, Good Governance and Living standards Centre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesObservation 1: All nine dimensions contribute to GNH. Happy people live relatively balanced lives.No dimension is unimportantCentre for Bhutan StudiesObservation 2: Good Health (14%)Community (12%)Ecology (12%), andPsychological well-being (12%) Contribute the most to GNH in 2010. Centre for Bhutan StudiesObservation 2: Good Health (14%)Community (12%)Ecology (12%), andPsychological well-being (12%) Contribute the most to GNH in 2010. 89% of Bhutanese either do not suffer from long term disability or those who are disable ones are not restricted from doing their daily activities 86% of Bhutanese have normal mental wellbeing 76% of Bhutanese have sufficient number of healthy days 74% of Bhutanese have rated their health as either good or very good Centre for Bhutan Studies 89% of Bhutanese either do not suffer from long term disability or those who are disable ones are not restricted from doing their daily activities 86% of Bhutanese have normal mental wellbeing 76% of Bhutanese have sufficient number of health days 74% of Bhutanese have rated their health as either good or very good Of the Bhutanese who achieved sufficiency levels in disability, 39% are happy (fulfill the happiness threshold) Of the Bhutanese who have normal mental wellbeing (86), 39% are happy Of the Bhutanese who have achieved sufficient levels of healthy days, 36% are happy Of the Bhutanese who have sufficiency in self reported health status , 35% are happy Centre for Bhutan StudiesObservation 2: Good Health (14%)Community (12%)Ecology (12%), andPsychological well-being (12%) Contribute the most to GNH in 2010. 96% of Bhutanese have never been victims of crime 93% of Bhutanese report good family relationship 76% of Bhutanese report good community relationship 46% of Bhutanese have sufficiency in donations (time & money) Centre for Bhutan StudiesObservation 2: Good Health (14%)Community (12%)Ecology (12%), andPsychological well-being (12%) Contribute the most to GNH in 2010. 39% of Bhutanese who report good family relationship are happy 27% of Bhutanese who have good community relationship are happy 21% of Bhutanese who have sufficiency in donations (time & money) are also classified happy Centre for Bhutan StudiesObservation 2: Good Health (14%)Community (12%)Ecology (12%), andPsychological well-being (12%) Contribute the most to GNH in 2010. 83% of Bhutanese have sufficiency in life satisfaction 65% of Bhutanese report low negative emotions59% of Bhutanese report high positive emotions Only 53% of Bhutanese have sufficiency in spirituality Centre for Bhutan Studies 83% of Bhutanese have sufficiency in life satisfaction 65% of Bhutanese report low negative emotions59% of Bhutanese report high positive emotions53% of Bhutanese have sufficiency in spirituality Centre for Bhutan Studies 83% of Bhutanese have sufficiency in life satisfaction 65% of Bhutanese report low negative emotions59% of Bhutanese report high positive emotions 53% of Bhutanese have sufficiency in spirituality Centre for Bhutan StudiesObservation 3: Happy Bhutanese did not necessarily have high education (9%). Nor did they score equally high in Good Governance (9%). .Bhutanese enjoy highest sufficiency in value, safety, native language, family, mental health, etc.Centre for Bhutan StudiesThe indicators in which happy people still often lack sufficiency were knowledge, participation in festivals, donations, having more than 6 years of schooling, enjoying government services, participating politically, and believing in the practice of Driglam Namzha.Centre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesThe GNH Index is relatively equal. There are not many significant differences. A larger sample would give higher definition. Centre for Bhutan StudiesBut we might divide Dzongkhags into roughly 3 groups. Centre for Bhutan StudiesHigher GNHLower GNHSamdrup Jongkhar probably has the lowest GNH IndexGNH index map by districtHigher GNH IndexLower GNH IndexGNH Index by districtCentre for Bhutan StudiesGNH Index by districtLow GNH IndexHigh GNH IndexHigher GNH IndexLower GNH IndexCentre for Bhutan StudiesPercentage of happy people by districtLower percentage of happy peopleHigher percentage of happy people Centre for Bhutan StudiesGNH ranks districts differently than per capita income Centre for Bhutan StudiesGNH ranks districts differently than per capita income Thimphu is not ranked most highly in GNH.Centre for Bhutan StudiesGNH ranks districts differently than per capita income Thimphu is not ranked most highly in GNH.Dagana and Zhemgang do much better in GNH than income. Centre for Bhutan StudiesWhere do the happy people live?Thimphu and Chukha are home to the highest number of happy people.And unhappy people! They are big dzongkhags. Next: Samtse & SarpangCentre for Bhutan Studies The composition of happiness changes a little across Dzongkhags. Thimphu is better in education & living standards, but worse in community vitalityCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesPsychological wellbeingHealthTime useEducationCultural diversity and resilienceGood GovernanceCommunity vitalityEcological diversity and resilienceLiving standardsParo and Samdrup differ most in work time, fundamental rights, services, income, housing and wildlife damage . Centre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples Stories..50% of urban dwellers are happy as per GNH criteria.In rural areas, Community vitality, Cultural diversity and Good Governance contribute more to happinessLiving standards, Education and Health contribute more to happiness in urban areasCentre for Bhutan StudiesPsychological wellbeingHealthTime useEducationCultural diversity and resilienceGood GovernanceCommunity vitalityEcological diversity and resilienceLiving standardsCentre for Bhutan StudiesPsychological wellbeingHealthTime useEducationCultural diversity and resilienceGood GovernanceCommunity vitalityEcological diversity and resilienceLiving standardsUrban areas have higher sufficiency in Health, Education, and Living standards.Centre for Bhutan StudiesPsychological wellbeingHealthTime useEducationCultural diversity and resilienceGood GovernanceCommunity vitalityEcological diversity and resilienceLiving standardsRural areas have higher sufficiency in Community, Culture, & much of Governance. Centre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesMen are happier than women. Centre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesPsychological wellbeingHealthEducationCultural diversity and resilienceGood GovernanceCommunity vitalityEcological diversity and resilienceLiving standardsCentre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesAge group analysis of GNH Index and Psychic Happiness variable Centre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesAs education increases, contribution of living standards & education to happiness increases; governance and culture decrease Centre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesCentre for Bhutan StudiesPart II: Understanding HappinessNational happinessHappiness by DzongkhagHappiness by regionHappiness by genderHappiness by age groupHappiness by marital statusHappiness by educational levelHappiness by occupational groupPeoples StoriesCentre for Bhutan StudiesWho is Happy? Some real people(minor details have been changed)Centre for Bhutan StudiesOne happy person in the GNH survey was a married woman aged 35 living in rural Haa. She is a housewife who has completed primary school. Again, she achieved sufficiency in over 90% of the domains. She said she still suffered from selfishness and jealousy, and did not donate very much time/money. She was concerned about littering and the absence of good waste disposal, as well as floods, and did not know any zorig chosum skill.Centre for Bhutan StudiesWhen asked what contributed most to her happiness she said:Having sufficient incomeBeing in good relation with the husbandWhen everyone is in good health. Centre for Bhutan StudiesAnother happy person in the GNH survey was a young man aged 22 who lived in rural Sarpang and was never married. He is a farmer who finished primary school. His only deprivations were that wildlife damaged his crops, and that he did not know about his political rights. Centre for Bhutan StudiesWhen asked what contributed most to happiness he said:A peaceful environmentEnough moneyNo sufferingGood healthGood relations with my friends. Centre for Bhutan StudiesAnother happy person in the GNH survey was a widowed gomchen aged 70 living in rural Thimphu. He had no formal education, and was deprived in education, housing, sleep and did not participate politically. He observed that getting good agricultural products from the land contributes to happiness. Centre for Bhutan StudiesAnother happy person in the GNH survey was a married woman farmer aged 44 living in rural Tongsa. She was illiterate, and was deprived from wildlife damage to her crops, and thought she never felt forgiveness among the positive emotions yet was happy. She mused that she felt happy when she was able to do her household work, when she was harvesting potatoes, and as she wove. Centre for Bhutan StudiesAnother happy person in the GNH survey was a married shopkeeper aged 37 living in urban Bumthang. He has finished 10th class, and meditates and prays regularly. He enjoys sufficiency in nearly every indicator. But he did mention that at the moment he only rarely experiences calmness and contentment. He also lacked some knowledge and did not think Driglam Namzha was terribly important. Centre for Bhutan StudiesAnother happy person in the GNH survey was a married corporate employee aged 35 living in urban Chukha. He has completed 10th class, and has achieved sufficiency in nearly all indicators. He was a bit sleep deprived, and did not feel a deep sense of belonging to his community, but was overall very satisfied with his life. Centre for Bhutan StudiesWhen asked what contributed most to happiness he said:To be healthyTo meet basic needsTo have peace in the familyTo be religiousCentre for Bhutan StudiesOur final happy person in the GNH survey isan unmarried young woman aged 26 living in urban Tashigang. She completed a bachelors degree and is a civil servant living alone. She scores highly across domains, although she misses a sense of belonging. When asked what contributes to her happiness she replied: Love, Family, Friends, Education, and Enough money. . The 2010 Gross National Happiness Index : Part IIThe Centre for Bhutan Studies2011. Centre for Bhutan Studies

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