The Digital Dividend Opportunities and challenges for future Broadcasting Services

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The Digital Dividend Opportunities and challenges for future Broadcasting Services. Daniel Sauvet-Goichon (TDF, France) DigiTAG Chairman Sarajevo, 30 March 2006. What is DigiTAG ?. A non profit association formed in 1996, in the vicinity of the DVB project and the EBU, in Geneva - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • The Digital Dividend

    Opportunities and challenges for future Broadcasting Services Daniel Sauvet-Goichon (TDF, France)DigiTAG ChairmanSarajevo, 30 March 2006

  • What is DigiTAG ?A non profit association formed in 1996, in the vicinity of the DVB project and the EBU, in Geneva

    To promote and help Digital Terrestrial Television start in Europe

    Created by 70 member organisations from 4 constituenciesBroadcasters (public, commercial, private)Manufacturers equipment and consumer productsNetwork and transmission operatorsBroadcast regulators and frequency spectrum administrations

  • Overview of the presentationI - Boarding to the futureHigh Definition TVTV to mobiles

    II - The European Spectrum Dividend question

    III - So what?

  • Part IDTT: boarding to the futureStarting DTT opens doors to

  • HDTV (High definition TV) Question 1 How long will DTT remain SD?

  • Question 1How long will DTT remain SD? Wide screen flat displays are there!

  • Question 1How long will DTT remain SD? Blu - ray Disc and HD DVH are almost there!

  • Question 1How long will DTT remain SD? Consumers will soon become HD producers

  • Question 1How long will DTT remain SD? European consumers are made aware of HD

  • DTT : boarding to the futureQuestion 1: How long will DTT remain standard quality (SD)?

    Answer: DTT provides flexibility to start SD and move progressively towards HDTVFirst multiplexes may stay SD for some timeNew future multiplexes will provide HDTV possibilities

    This may imply keeping some flexibility in your technical choicessuch as (for example)

  • Choose right parameters:MPEG2 or MPEG 4?French example

    TNT network

    R1

    R2

    R3

    R4

    R5

    R6

    Not

    Programs

    yet

    allocated

    Free TV, MPEG 2

    Pay TV, MPEG 4

  • Choose right parameters:MPEG2 or MPEG 4?Balance STB cost versus capacityFrench exampleSTB = Set Top Box

  • Mobile TVDVB-H (Handheld devices) Question 2 Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success?

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? Caption Commercial launch Pre commercial launch Pilot project Project studyJaponISDB-T, Mobile Broadcasting Co (MBCO), S-DMBUSA Qualcomm, Mediaflo, Crown CastleSingapour MediaCorpTV, ISDB-T, 2004Nokia, MediaCorp, DVB-HAustralieDVB-H, Canal 29 Sydney, ChinaMarco Polo DVB-H project Taiwan Chunghwa Telecom/Nokia/CMC Magnetics, DVB-H, South KoreaKorean broadcast networks, T-DMBTU Media, SK Telecom, S-DMB

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? Germany BMCO, DVB-H, BerlinFinlandFinish Mobile TV, Digita, DVB-H, UKNTL, DVB-H, OxfordFranceTDF, DVB-H, 2005TowerCast, DVB-H, 2005TPS Orange ByTel TDF, DVB-HSwitzerland Swisscom, DVB-H, Berne. 2006Lgende Commercial pre-launchPilot projectProject study

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? Commercial pilot test in Finland during March June 2005

    500 test users of different ages

    Coverage of the Helsinki Metropolitan area

    Pilot users paid for the basic network access fee (4.90)Focus on the Finnish experiment

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? Mobile TVSource: Finnish mobile TV research international

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? Source: Finnish mobile TV research international When traveling using public transportation When at home When at work

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? What type of content?

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? Interest

  • Question 2Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success? DVB-H handbook available at www.digitag.org

  • DTT : boarding to the futureQuestion 2: Will mobile TV be an overwhelming success

    Answer: most probably YES

    A word of caution: Mobile TV is a broadcasting service (one to many). It is not transmission of video content thru a personal mobile communication (one to one) which would be much more expensiveBut have we got enough frequencies?

  • Have we got enough frequencies for future uses?but there is moreITU Regional frequency planning conference RRC 04 06 has part of the answer

  • The EuropeanSpectrum DividendquestionPart IIA challenge for future broadcasting services

  • An EC objectiveGet a Digital DividendUsing less spectrum in UHF/VHF bands, Broadcasting digitisation provides a spectrum dividend which represents a value in each Member State that could be used to meet economic, social and cultural objectivesRSPG04-55

  • RSPG answer (2004): The spectrum dividend Digitisation leaves an undecided but considerable amount of spectrum in the relevant bands for more services such as broadcasting or other telecommunications servicesHow much spectrum?For what purpose?Who will decide?Will UHF bands IV&V remain Broadcasting only?

  • Digital Dividend The controversy actorsBroadcastersRegulatorsMobile operatorsOther

  • Digital DividendBroadcastersWe need whole bands IV and V!

  • Digital DividendBroadcastersWill RRC06 leave unplanned / unused spectrum?

    Will RRC06 fulfil mobile / handheld needs?Certainly not! RRC06 has the mandate to Plan the whole UHF rangeNot satisfactorily! None of the planned service types corresponds

  • Digital DividendTelcos Get more frequency bands to develop by themselves

    UK already indicated around 14 UHF channels may become available when the last analogue service is switched off

    ITU WRC 2010 already has an agenda item to consider allocations to the mobile service in band 806 862 MHz in Region 1, following the transition from analogue to digital TVReallocation of UHF spectrum =Confrontation with Broadcasting ServiceHow can we avoid it?

  • Regulators: New frequency management methodsAre we interested, prepared or waiting to buy or tradesome released UHF spectrum dividend?This could become reality in some of our countries

  • Regulators: New frequency management methodsSpectrum Framework Review, June 2005Let market competition decide about spectrum useThis is Technological neutrality = valuation + market toolsMost European Regulators are more cautious!UK: an extreme?

  • Digital DividendOtherPlus a new paradigm:Software radio and Cognitive radio can sense where to operate without causing interferenceLarge part of frequency spectrum is empty! Even in the Broadcasting UHF spectrum!This may be true in parts of Northern America with a very light density of broadcasting transmitters, but I do not believe it applies in most of the European area!They often say:

  • Digital DividendOtherPractical implementation in UHF

  • OtherCould this happen in Europe?Already wireless microphones are in use in VHF / UHFIt has to be studied by Broadcasters, at least to be sure that their services are appropriately protectedPerhaps on a small scale

  • So what?

  • So what? Facts and certainties The ITU RCC06 Plan will use the whole VHF UHF spectrum

    Politicians (EC) will not give up the Digital Spectrum Dividend topic and profits

    Cooperation between Telcos and Broadcasters is the best path towards multimedia to mobile devices. It avoids unnecessary confrontationThese imply

  • Conclusion:Dont miss the train!

  • Contact usWebsite: www.digitag.orgProject office: projectoffice@digitag.orgSubscribe to our monthly web letter with news information on the DTT market

    5 multiplexes have started.A 6th one has not yet been allocated by the CSA.

    Both MPEG2 and MPEG4 will coexistMPEG2 mandatory for free to air programmes (THE WHITE CELLS)MPEG4 SD mandatory for pay TV programmes (THE YELLOW and ORANGE CELLS)YELLOW AND ORANGE are equivalent : Yellow correspond to already allocated licences.Orange cells are still under licensing process

    Now, What does it mean for the consumer ? NEXT5 multiplexes have started.A 6th one has not yet been allocated by the CSA.

    Both MPEG2 and MPEG4 will coexistMPEG2 mandatory for free to air programmes (THE WHITE CELLS)MPEG4 SD mandatory for pay TV programmes (THE YELLOW and ORANGE CELLS)YELLOW AND ORANGE are equivalent : Yellow correspond to already allocated licences.Orange cells are still under licensing process

    Now, What does it mean for the consumer ? NEXTTaiwan - Mobile DVB-T reception in Kaohsiung (04/02/2005)Kaohsiung has become the third metropolis to provide digital terrestrial television services on its public transportation network. The project is known as Dimo TV. 165 buses are equipped with a 19 inch LCD screen and DVB-T receiver in order to capt a special programme service channel. Programmes broadcast on the buses are commercial-free and aim to educate and entertain viewers. While sound is available, all programmes are also subtitled. Source: PTS Telstra intends to partner Bridge Networks for DVB-H trial (23February2005)The Bridge Networks, a wholly owned subsidiary of Broadcast Australia, hasannounced that Telstra has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the intention of being a major partner in Australias first trial of DVB-H. The Sydney-based 12-month trial is expected to commence in mid 2005 and will test the technical capability and commercial prospects for DVB-H applications in Australia. Equipment vendors and technical support providers Harris Broadcast Systems and Australian-based RFS have also agreed to participate in the DVB-H trial. Darren Kirsop-Frearson, Managing Director, The Bridge Networks, said, We expect the DVB-H transmissions to cover 80 percent of Sydney or around 3.2 million people. Telstra will be the telecommunications carrier, provide the customer interface, handsets and some content; Harris Corporation is supplying transmission equipment and technical support; and Australian-manufacturer, RFS will be providing Radio Frequency combining products and services for the transmission of the DVB-H signal. The intention is to have up to 1000 DVB-H capable handsets for the trial, using a sample of Telstras customer base, and to subsequently measure coverage, particularly within buildings, as well as survey consumer response and acceptance. Its a very exciting broadcasting development and evidence of a true convergence of the broadcast and telecommunications industries, Mr Kirsop-Frearson said.It is estimated that an initial 15 channel offering will quickly grow to a total of 30 channels by the end of the expected 12-month trial, which will be broadcast from Broadcast Australias Gore Hill transmission site in Sydney. Source: The Bridge Networks

    Mobile satellite broadcasting ready for launch 09-09-2004 Companies in South Korea and Japan say they are ready to launch a new satellite broadcasting service in the next two months that can send video and audio directly to devices such as mobile telephones, handheld terminals and in-car receivers. Prototype terminals for the service, which will be launched in South Korea by TU Media Corp. and in Japan by Mobile Broadcasting Co. (MBCO), were on show at the International Telecommunication Union's (ITU) Telecom Asia 2004 conference and exhibition here in Busan, South Korea, this week. The services will broadcast from a satellite launched by the two companies earlier this year. Unlike existing satellite systems that require dish antennas, the service uses L-band frequencies, which are around 2.6GHz and close to those used by third-generation (3G) cellular services, so it can be received using an antenna built into a portable receiver. TU Media is planning to broadcast a package of 14 video channels and 24 audio channels from November for a monthly charge of 13,000 won (US$11), said Cho Jin-Ho, manager of the company's technology strategy team. The service also will include video files that can be downloaded into the memory of the terminal device and played on demand, he said. Both Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. and LG Electronics Inc. have produced prototype cellular telephones for the service, which were on show at the exhibition. The Samsung SCH-B100 is a candy-bar form factor model and has viewing screen that swivels out from behind the telephone body to provide a landscape-oriented screen on which to watch TU Media's TV offering. It can record up to two hours of video in MPEG4, has a 2-megapixel camera, MP3 player and QVGA resolution (240 pixels by 320 pixels) TFT (thin film transistor) LCD (liquid crystal display). The LG SB-100 is a clamshell handset with a square 2.4-inch LCD that offers 320 pixel by 320 pixel resolution. Because the screen is wider than a conventional mobile phone, it means the video can be watched in full QVGA resolution without having to turn the phone on its side to accommodate the image. It too can record TV programming and comes with a 1-megapixel camera. Both telephones are expected out before the end of this year and TU Media is also planning to provide a handheld terminal and receiver system for cars, said Cho. Japan's MBCO will start its service in October and plans to offer seven video channels and 30 audio channels, said Yoshitake Yamaguchi, senior manager for MBCO's satellite and coordination group. The service will cost between 1,000 ($9) and 3,000 depending on the number of channels selected. The company was demonstrating a prototype receiver, produced by Toshiba, at the exhibition and Yamaguchi said Sharp Corp. is also working on a receiver. Both are expected to be ready in time for next month's launch. The company is also anticipating a CF (Compact Flash) card receiver for use with personal computers will be available soon and, sometime next year, cellular telephones with support for the service. Whether consumers are willing to pay for such multimedia content remains to be seen. TU Media's TV lineup will include South Korea's four major TV networks while MBCO will include about eight hours per day from leading Japanese public broadcaster NHK (Nippon Hoso Kyokai) and cable channels such as MTV Japan and all-news NNN24. "I think (satellite broadcasting to mobile terminals) will work well in markets were there are many commuters," said Tim Kelly, head of the ITU's policy and strategy unit. Kelly, the author of a new ITU report on the mobile Internet that was published on Wednesday, said he believes people on long commutes want to watch TV and that delivering such services via satellite works better and more efficiently that over the cellular network. Commuters make up one market that MBCO is interested in, Yamaguchi said. Many people who work in Tokyo face commutes of at least an hour to get to work each day and so listening to music or browsing or messaging on cell phones is a popular activity during what would otherwise be dead time. Yamaguchi said MBCO has worked to build a network of gap-filler transmitters that provide service in areas that cannot be reached via satellite. One of MBCO's priorities was the Yamanote railway line that circles central Tokyo and carries more than 3 million passengers per day. Coverage of that area is now at 99 percent, he said.

    Taiwan - Mobile DVB-T reception in Kaohsiung (04/02/2005)Kaohsiung has become the third metropolis to provide digital terrestrial television services on its public transportation network. The project is known as Dimo TV. 165 buses are equipped with a 19 inch LCD screen and DVB-T receiver in order to capt a special programme service channel. Programmes broadcast on the buses are commercial-free and aim to educate and entertain viewers. While sound is available, all programmes are also subtitled. Source: PTS Telstra intends to partner Bridge Networks for DVB-H trial (23February2005)The Bridge Networks, a wholly owned subsidiary of Broadcast Australia, hasannounced that Telstra has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the intention of being a major partner in Australias first trial of DVB-H. The Sydney-based 12-month trial is expected to commence in mid 2005 and will test the technical capability and commercial prospects for DVB-H applications in Australia. Equipment vendors and technical support providers Harris Broadcast Systems and Australian-based RFS have also agreed to participate in the DVB-H trial. Darren Kirsop-Frearson, Managing Director, The Bridge Networks, said, We expect the DVB-H transmissions to cover 80 percent of Sydney or around 3.2 million people. Telstra will be the telecommunications carrier, provide the customer interface, handsets and some content; Harris Corporation is supplying transmission equipment and technical support; and Australian-manufacturer, RFS will be providing Radio Frequency combining products and services for the transmission of the DVB-H signal. The intention is to have up to 1000 DVB-H capable handsets for the trial, using a sample of Telstras customer base, and to subsequently measure coverage, particularly within buildings, as well as survey consumer response and acceptance. Its a very exciting broadcasting development and evidence of a true convergence of the broadcast and telecommunications industries, Mr Kirsop-Frearson said.It is estimated that an initial 15 channel offering will quickly grow to a total of 30 channels by the end of the expected 12-month trial, which will be broadcast from Broadcast Australias Gore Hill transmission site in Sydney. Source: The Bridge Networks

    Mobile satellite broadcasting ready for launch 09-09-2004 Companies in South Korea and Japan say they are ready to launch a new satellite broadcasting service in the next two months that can send video and audio directly to devices such as mobile telephones, handheld terminals and in-car receivers. Prototype terminals for the service, which will be launched in South Korea by TU Media Corp. and in Japan by Mobile Broadcasting Co. (MBCO), were on show at the International Telecommunication Union's (ITU) Telecom Asia 2004 conference and exhibition here in Busan, South Korea, this week. The services will broadcast from a satellite launched by the two companies earlier this year. Unlike existing satellite systems that require dish antennas, the service uses L-band frequencies, which are around 2.6GHz and close to those used by third-generation (3G) cellular services, so it can be received using an antenna built into a portable receiver. TU Media is planning to broadcast a package of 14 video channels and 24 audio channels from November for a monthly charge of 13,000 won (US$11), said Cho Jin-Ho, manager of the company's technology strategy team. The service also will include video files that can be downloaded into the memory of the terminal device and played on demand, he said. Both Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. and LG Electronics Inc. have produced prototype cellular telephones for the service, which were on show at the exhibition. The Samsung SCH-B100 is a candy-bar form factor model and has viewing screen that swivels out from behind the telephone body to provide a landscape-oriented screen on which to watch TU Media's TV offering. It can record up to two hours of video in MPEG4, has a 2-megapixel camera, MP3 player and QVGA resolution (240 pixels by 320 pixels) TFT (thin film transistor) LCD (liquid crystal display). The LG SB-100 is a clamshell handset with a square 2.4-inch LCD that offers 320 pixel by 320 pixel resolution. Because the screen is wider than a conventional mobile phone, it means the video can be watched in full QVGA resolution without having to turn the phone on its side to accommodate the image. It too can record TV programming and comes with a 1-megapixel camera. Both telephones are expected out before the end of this year and TU Media is also planning to provide a handheld terminal and receiver system for cars, said Cho. Japan's MBCO will start its service in October and plans to offer seven video channels and 30 audio channels, said Yoshitake Yamaguchi, senior manager for MBCO's satellite and coordination group. The service will cost between 1,000 ($9) and 3,000 depending on the number of channels selected. The company was demonstrating a prototype receiver, produced by Toshiba, at the exhibition and Yamaguchi said Sharp Corp. is also working on a receiver. Both are expected to be ready in time for next month's launch. The company is also anticipating a CF (Compact Flash) card receiver for use with personal computers will be available soon and, sometime next year, cellular telephones with support for the service. Whether consumers are willing to pay for such multimedia content remains to be seen. TU Media's TV lineup will include South Korea's four major TV networks while MBCO will include about eight hours per day from leading Japanese public broadcaster NHK (Nippon Hoso Kyokai) and cable channels such as MTV Japan and all-news NNN24. "I think (satellite broadcasting to mobile terminals) will work well in markets were there are many commuters," said Tim Kelly, head of the ITU's policy and strategy unit. Kelly, the author of a new ITU report on the mobile Internet that was published on Wednesday, said he believes people on long commutes want to watch TV and that delivering such services via satellite works better and more efficiently that over the cellular network. Commuters make up one market that MBCO is interested in, Yamaguchi said. Many people who work in Tokyo face commutes of at least an hour to get to work each day and so listening to music or browsing or messaging on cell phones is a popular activity during what would otherwise be dead time. Yamaguchi said MBCO has worked to build a network of gap-filler transmitters that provide service in areas that cannot be reached via satellite. One of MBCO's priorities was the Yamanote railway line that circles central Tokyo and carries more than 3 million passengers per day. Coverage of that area is now at 99 percent, he said.

    The discussion was launched in 2003 by the European Commission

    when they asked the Radio Spectrum Policy Group

    for an opinion on spectrum implications of switchover to Digital Broadcasting.

    For those who dont know,The Radio Spectrum Policy Group is a permanent group set up by the Commission to assist and advise on radio policy issues and harmonised conditions for an efficient use of the spectrum

    Prepare for the future is a must.

    Broadcasters have to go High Definition if they want to provide the same quality as other media at home.

    The only way to do that will be the Digital Dividend left by analogue switch offLets turn to RRC06 results and raise two questions.

    The first :will RRC06 leave unused spectrum?

    My own answer, based on the results of the first planning exercise, is : probably not!

    There will be enough difficulties to reach a success rate of 100% starting from 61 presently.And by the way, it is a good question for each of us!

    In our businesses, are we interested, prepared or waiting to buy or tradesome released UHF spectrum dividend?

    This could be a real question for the future in some of our European countriesThey often say that most of the spectrum is usually empty

    And indeed, in some areas, scanning thru time and frequency shows a low density of uses! They even say this for the broadcasting UHF spectrum [at least in countries with a light density of broadcasting transmitters, USA for example]

    There is also a new paradigm which says the following:

    Software radio and Cognitive radio can sense where to operate without causing interferenceAnd in 2004 this led to a notice of enquiry issued by FCC.

    The idea is to allow unlicensed radio transmitters to operate in the broadcast television spectrum at locations where that spectrum is not being used.

    Of course this goes along with the condition to use smart radio features in the devices to avoid interfering the existing TV services.

    These transmitters would use geo location technologies, spectrum sensing techniques and so onCould this happen in Europe?

    Perhaps on a small scale: Already wireless microphones are in use in VHF / UHF

    But anyway, It has to be studied by Broadcasters, at least to be sure that their services are appropriately protectedFirst, I would like to express 3 points which seem to be rather certain

    The ITU RCC06 Plan will use the whole VHF UHF spectrum

    Politicians (EC) will not give up the Digital Spectrum Dividend topic and related profits

    Cooperation between Telcos and Broadcasters is the best path towards multimedia to mobile devices. It avoids unnecessary confrontation

    These facts lead to some implications

    First, I would like to express 3 points which seem to be rather certain

    The ITU RCC06 Plan will use the whole VHF UHF spectrum

    Politicians (EC) will not give up the Digital Spectrum Dividend topic and related profits

    Cooperation between Telcos and Broadcasters is the best path towards multimedia to mobile devices. It avoids unnecessary confrontation

    These facts lead to some implications

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