The Sacraments Chapter 9. The Sacraments in General Form Intention Matter Sacraments.

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  • Slide 1
  • The Sacraments Chapter 9
  • Slide 2
  • The Sacraments in General Form Intention Matter Sacraments
  • Slide 3
  • The Catechism of the CC 1210 Christ instituted the sacraments of the new law. There are seven: Baptism, Confirmation (or Chrismation), the Eucharist, Penance, the Anointing of the Sick, Holy Orders and Matrimony. The seven sacraments touch all the stages and all the important moments of Christian life:[1] they give birth and increase, healing and mission to the Christian's life of faith. There is thus a certain resemblance between the stages of natural life and the stages of the spiritual life.
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  • The Catechism of the CC 1211 Following this analogy, the first chapter will expound the three sacraments of Christian initiation; the second, the sacraments of healing; and the third, the sacraments at the service of communion and the mission of the faithful. This order, while not the only one possible, does allow one to see that the sacraments form an organic whole in which each particular sacrament has its own vital place. In this organic whole, the Eucharist occupies a unique place as the "Sacrament of sacraments": "all the other sacraments are ordered to it as to their end."
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  • Sacraments and Grace Sacraments are outward signs of inward grace, instituted by Christ for our sanctification graceChrist
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  • Sacraments of Initiation Baptism Confirmation Eucharist Most Catholics received these sacraments in this sequence: Baptism, Eucharist and Confirmation.
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  • Baptism Baptism Baptismal Font Baptismal Vows Christian Names Baptism Baptismal Font Baptismal Vows Christian Names
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  • Baptism At Baptism, we pray over the water: "Father, look now with love upon your Church, and unseal for her the fountain of baptism. By the power of the Holy Spirit give to this water the grace of your Son, so that in the sacrament of baptism all those whom you have created in your likeness may be cleansed from sin and rise to a new birth of innocence by water and the Holy Spirit" (Christian Initiation of Adults, #222A).
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  • Confirmation Holy Spirit Chrismatic Oil Saints Names (Who is your hero?) Saints Names
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  • A change of condition A change of namecondition conversion of Abram into Abraham (the "father of many nations" Genesis 17:5) covenant of circumcision ratified God's special benediction. conversionAbraham Genesis 17:5circumcisionGod's Hebrew practice giving a name to the male child at the time of its circumcision on the eighth day after birth (Luke 1:59),name circumcisionLuke 1:59 conferring a name upon newly baptized Apostolic originApostolic apostle of the Gentiles before his conversion called Saul and afterwards Paul. apostleGentilesconversion The baptism of St. Paul Acts 9:18, but name Paul does not occur before Acts 13:9 while Saul is found several times in the interval.baptismSt. PaulActs 9:18Acts 13:9 We have no more reason to connect the name Paul with the Apostle's baptism than we have to account in the same way for the giving of the name Cephas or Peter, which we know to be due to another cause.Apostle's baptismPeterknow
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  • Change of name in adult convertsconverts Athenais who married the Emperor Theodosius the Younger, baptized (A.D. 421) receiving the name Eudoxia.baptized King Caedwalla who went to Rome baptized by Pope Sergius who gave him the name of Peter.Romebaptized Pope Sergius Guthrum the Danish leader in England who after his long contest with King Alfred was defeated consenting to accept Christianity was baptized in 878.DanishEnglandKing Alfred consentingChristianitybaptized
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  • What does "confirm" mean? To confirm means to strengthen. In Confirmation our faith is deepened and strengthened, and through this sacrament we are more perfectly bound to Christ and to his Church. (1285) In Christ you who heard the word of truth-the good news of your salvation-and believed it were sealed by the promised Holy Spirit, which is the pledge that we shall gain our inheritance when God redeems what is his, to the praise of his glory! (Eph 1:13-14).
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  • How is Confirmation given? In the Latin Rite, the bishop extends his hands over the person and anoints the forehead in the form of a cross while saying: "Be sealed with the Gift of the Holy Spirit." The person being confirmed answers "Amen," meaning, "Let it be so." The Gift is the Holy Spirit, who is the Gift of the Father and the Son to us. (1299-1301) Then they laid their hands on them, and they received the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:17).
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  • Confirmation As became separated from Baptism by a number of years, teachers and preachers began to speak of the meaning of Confirmation apart from the meaning of Baptism. Confirmation began to be described as a sacrament of "strengthening." The embrace of welcome and "kiss of peace" (which had become a "love pat" in the case of infants) now became a "slap on the cheek" to remind those being confirmed that they had become "soldiers for Christ."
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  • Confirmation At Confirmation, we learn what this new life in the Spirit implies: "All-powerful God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, by water and the Holy Spirit you freed your sons and daughters from sin and gave them new life. Send your Holy Spirit upon them to be their helper and guide. Give them the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of right judgment and courage, the spirit of knowledge and reverence. Fill them with the spirit of wonder and awe in your presence" (Christian Initiation of Adults, #234).
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  • CONFIRMATION IN THE ECONOMY OF SALVATION (CCC) The descent of the Holy Spirit on Jesus at his baptism by John was the sign that this was he who was to come, the Messiah 1286 In the Old Testament the prophets announced that the Spirit of the Lord would rest on the hoped-for Messiah for his saving mission.91 The descent of the Holy Spirit on Jesus at his baptism by John was the sign that this was he who was to come, the Messiah, the Son of God.92 He was conceived of the Holy Spirit; his whole life and his whole mission are carried out in total communion with the Holy Spirit whom the Father gives him "without measure."93 Pentecost.96 Filled with the Holy Spirit the apostles began to proclaim "the mighty works of God," 1287 This fullness of the Spirit was not to remain uniquely the Messiah's, but was to be communicated to the whole messianic people.94 On several occasions Christ promised this outpouring of the Spirit,95 a promise which he fulfilled first on Easter Sunday and then more strikingly at Pentecost.96 Filled with the Holy Spirit the apostles began to proclaim "the mighty works of God," and Peter declared this outpouring of the Spirit to be the sign of the messianic age.97 Those who believed in the apostolic preaching and were baptized received the gift of the Holy Spirit in their turn.98
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  • CONFIRMATION IN THE ECONOMY OF SALVATION (CCC) the laying on of hands the gift of the Spirit that completes the grace of Baptism 1288 "From that time on the apostles, in fulfillment of Christ's will, imparted to the newly baptized by the laying on of hands the gift of the Spirit that completes the grace of Baptism. For this reason in the Letter to the Hebrews the doctrine concerning Baptism and the laying on of hands is listed among the first elements of Christian instruction. The imposition of hands is rightly recognized by the Catholic tradition as the origin of the sacrament of Confirmation, which in a certain way perpetuates the grace of Pentecost in the Church."99 an anointing with perfumed oil (chrism) was added to the laying on of hands. This anointing highlights the name "Christian," which means "anointed" and derives from that of Christ himself whom God "anointed with the Holy Spirit." 1289 Very early, the better to signify the gift of the Holy Spirit, an anointing with perfumed oil (chrism) was added to the laying on of hands. This anointing highlights the name "Christian," which means "anointed" and derives from that of Christ himself whom God "anointed with the Holy Spirit."100 This rite of anointing has continued ever since, in both East and West. For this reason the Eastern Churches call this sacrament Chrismation, anointing with chrism, or myron which means "chrism." In the West, the term Confirmation suggests that this sacrament both confirms and strengthens baptismal grace.
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  • Isaiah Chapter 11 1 But a shoot shall sprout from the stump of Jesse, and from his roots a bud shall blossom. spirit of the LORD wisdomunderstanding counselstrength knowledgefear of the LORD 2 The spirit of the LORD shall rest upon him: a spirit of wisdom and of understanding, A spirit of counsel and of strength, a spirit of knowledge and of fear of the LORD, delight shall be the fear of the LORD.Not by appearance shall he judge 3 and his delight shall be the fear of the LORD. Not by appearance shall he judge, nor by hearsay shall he decide,
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  • Confirmation: Gifts of the Holy Spirit At Confirmation, we learn the implications of our new life in the Holy Spirit: Holy Spirit upon them to be their helper and guide. Give them the spirit of wisdom wisdom understanding, understanding, the spirit of right judgment the spirit of right judgment courage, courage, the spirit of knowledge the spirit of knowledge reverence. reverence. spirit of wonder and awe Fill them with the spirit of wonder and awe in your presence.
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  • The Holy Eucharist Communion of Children Communion of the Sick Communion under Both Kinds Eucharist Early Symbols of the Eucharist Frequent Communion Holy Communion Real Presence The Blessed Eucharist as a Sacrament The Blessed Eucharist as a Sacrifice Viaticum Communion of Children Communion of the Sick Communion under Both Kinds Eucharist Early Symbols of the Eucharist Frequent Communion Holy Communion Real Presence The Blessed Eucharist as a Sacrament The Blessed Eucharist as a Sacrifice Viaticum
  • Slide 21
  • Eucharist At Eucharist, with our sins washed away and clothed with the Spirit, we are led to the banquet table of the Lord's Supper. At each Eucharist we ask God to send the Spirit upon the bread and wine so that they become for us the Body and Blood of Christ. Then we pray that the Holy Spirit come upon uswe who eat and drinkso that we may become the Body of Christ.
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  • Holy Anointing Anointing of the Sick Extreme Unction
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  • Merciful Effects of Anointing Merciful effect of the sacrament of Anointing is the removal of both guilt and penalty for sin. Anointing restores sanctifying grace whenever the sacrament is received by a person in grave sin. The restoration of the degree of sanctifying grace and the title to actual graces depends on the spiritual dispositions of the person at the time of anointing. To be stressed is that the eternal punishment due to unrepentant mortal sins is always removed by every valid reception of the sacrament of Anointing. To be re-stressed is the importance of anointing to receive before death to insure salvation, which means deliverance from the eternal punishment of hell. Is it possible for this sacrament to remove all temporal punishment due to committed sins? Yes, indeed this is another reason why persons should receive anointing before they enter eternity. In this sense, anointing is the answer to the closing petition of the Lords Prayer when we ask, deliver us from evil, where the deliverance includes liberation even from purgatory.
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  • Penance Absolution Attrition Contrition Reserved Cases Sacrament of Penance Seal of Confession Absolution Attrition Contrition Reserved Cases Sacrament of Penance Seal of Confession
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  • Confession
  • Slide 26
  • Power to Forgive Sins sacrament of conversion 1423 It is called the sacrament of conversion because it makes sacramentally present Jesus' call to conversion, the first step in returning to the Father5 from whom one has strayed by sin. sacrament of Penance It is called the sacrament of Penance, since it consecrates the Christian sinner's personal and ecclesial steps of conversion, penance, and satisfaction. sacrament of confession 1424 It is called the sacrament of confession, since the disclosure or confession of sins to a priest is an essential element of this sacrament. In a profound sense it is also a "confession" - acknowledgment and praise - of the holiness of God and of his mercy toward sinful man. sacrament of forgiveness It is called the sacrament of forgiveness, since by the priest's sacramental absolution God grants the penitent "pardon and peace." sacrament of Reconciliation It is called the sacrament of Reconciliation, because it imparts to the sinner the love of God who reconciles: "Be reconciled to God." He who lives by God's merciful love is ready to respond to the Lord's call: "Go; first be reconciled to your brother."
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  • Penance Metanoia innermost change of heart under influence of the word of God. Changing one's life in harmony with the change of heart, and in this sense doing penance is completed by bringing forth fruits worthy of penance. One's whole existence that becomes penitential directed toward a continuous striving for what is better. Authentic and effective only if translated into deeds and acts of penance; an effort to put off the old man and put on the new. An effort to overcome in oneself what is of the flesh in order that what is spiritual. A continual effort to rise from the things of here below to the things of above, where Christ is. A conversion that passes from the heart to deeds and then to the Christian's whole life.
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  • Activity How would you remove sin? Examples: Jewish Tradition of the Scapegoat Jesus removes Legion from possessed man Agony in the Garden Washing in the pool of Siloam Rising and taking up of mat by the paralyzed man The woman caught in adultery Baptism Extreme Unction Appeal to God
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  • Pope John Paul IIs Pilgrimage to Israel March 21-26, 2000
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  • VII. THE ACTS OF THE PENITENT 1450 "Penance requires... the sinner to endure all things willingly, be contrite of heart, confess with the lips, and practice complete humility and fruitful satisfaction."
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  • Contrition 1451 Among the penitent's acts contrition occupies first place. Contrition is "sorrow of the soul and detestation for the sin committed, together with the resolution not to sin again."50 1452 When it arises from a love by which God is loved above all else, contrition is called "perfect" (contrition of charity). Such contrition remits venial sins; it also obtains forgiveness of mortal sins if it includes the firm resolution to have recourse to sacramental confession as soon as possible.51 1453 The contrition called "imperfect" (or "attrition") is also a gift of God, a prompting of the Holy Spirit. It is born of the consideration of sin's ugliness or the fear of eternal damnation and the other penalties threatening the sinner (contrition of fear).
  • Slide 32
  • Contrition Such a stirring of conscience can initiate an interior process which, under the prompting of grace, will be brought to completion by sacramental absolution. By itself however, imperfect contrition cannot obtain the forgiveness of grave sins, but it disposes one to obtain forgiveness in the sacrament of Penance. 1454 The reception of this sacrament ought to be prepared for by an examination of conscience made in the light of the Word of God. The passages best suited to this can be found in the Ten Commandments, the moral catechesis of the Gospels and the apostolic Letters, such as the Sermon on the Mount and the apostolic teachings.53
  • Slide 33
  • The confession of sins 1455 The confession (or disclosure) of sins, even from a simply human point of view, frees us and facilitates our reconciliation with others. Through such an admission man looks squarely at the sins he is guilty of, takes responsibility for them, and thereby opens himself again to God and to the communion of the Church in order to make a new future possible.
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  • The confession of sins 1456 Confession to a priest is an essential part of the sacrament of Penance: "All mortal sins of which penitents after a diligent self- examination are conscious must be recounted by them in confession, even if they are most secret and have been committed against the last two precepts of the Decalogue; for these sins sometimes wound the soul more grievously and are more dangerous than those which are committed openly."54 When Christ's faithful strive to confess all the sins that they can remember, they undoubtedly place all of them before the divine mercy for pardon. But those who fail to do so and knowingly withhold some, place nothing before the divine goodness for remission through the mediation of the priest, "for if the sick person is too ashamed to show his wound to the doctor, the medicine cannot heal what it does not know."55
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  • The confession of sins 1457 According to the Church's command, "after having attained the age of discretion, each of the faithful is bound by an obligation faithfully to confess serious sins at least once a year."56 Anyone who is aware of having committed a mortal sin must not receive Holy Communion, even if he experiences deep contrition, without having first received sacramental absolution, unless he has a grave reason for receiving Communion and there is no possibility of going to confession.57 Children must go to the sacrament of Penance before receiving Holy Communion for the first time.58
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  • The confession of sins 1458 Without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church.59 Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father's mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as he is merciful:60 Whoever confesses his sins... is already working with God. God indicts your sins; if you also indict them, you are joined with God. Man and sinner are, so to speak, two realities: when you hear "man" - this is what God has made; when you hear "sinner" - this is what man himself has made. Destroy what you have made, so that God may save what he has made.... When you begin to abhor what you have made, it is then that your good works are beginning, since you are accusing yourself of your evil works. The beginning of good works is the confession of evil works. You do the truth and come to the light.61
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  • Satisfaction 1459 Many sins wrong our neighbor. One must do what is possible in order to repair the harm (e.g., return stolen goods, restore the reputation of someone slandered, pay compensation for injuries). Simple justice requires as much. But sin also injures and weakens the sinner himself, as well as his relationships with God and neighbor. Absolution takes away sin, but it does not remedy all the disorders sin has caused.62 Raised up from sin, the sinner must still recover his full spiritual health by doing something more to make amends for the sin: he must "make satisfaction for" or "expiate" his sins. This satisfaction is also called "penance."
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  • Satisfaction 1460 The penance the confessor imposes must take into account the penitent's personal situation and must seek his spiritual good. It must correspond as far as possible with the gravity and nature of the sins committed. It can consist of prayer, an offering, works of mercy, service of neighbor, voluntary self- denial, sacrifices, and above all the patient acceptance of the cross we must bear. Such penances help configure us to Christ, who alone expiated our sins once for all. They allow us to become co-heirs with the risen Christ, "provided we suffer with him."63
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  • Holy Matrimony Banns of Marriage Betrothal Civil Marriage Divorce (in Moral Theology) Divorce (in Civil Jurisprudence) History of Marriage Mixed Marriage Moral and Canonical Aspect of Marriage Ritual of Marriage Sacrament of Marriage Validation of Marriage Banns of Marriage Betrothal Civil Marriage Divorce (in Moral Theology) Divorce (in Civil Jurisprudence) History of Marriage Mixed Marriage Moral and Canonical Aspect of Marriage Ritual of Marriage Sacrament of Marriage Validation of Marriage
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  • Holy Orders Bishop Deacons Holy Orders Minor Orders Priest & Priesthood PriestPriesthood
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