Why It is Good to Procrastinate

  • Published on
    20-Jul-2016

  • View
    219

  • Download
    0

DESCRIPTION

A personal essay on the underrated benefits of procrastinating

Transcript

  • Bianca Insigne

    Maria Karaan

    Communication in English I

    July 8, 2013

    The Positive Effects of Procrastination

    Procrastination: the act of delaying something that needs to be done until the very last minute.

    This is something that all students are bound to experience at least once in their lifetime and is an act

    looked down upon by parents, teachers, and even students themselves. From my experiences, there are

    five causes to procrastination. There is poor memory, terrible time management skills, inability to

    effectively prioritize, uncooperative group mates, and lastly (and probably worst of all) the

    disappearance or inexistance of inspiration and motivation. Whatever the reason for putting important

    things off until the last minute, it seems obvious that procrastination is simply bad because it can result

    in immense load of stress, sleep deprivation, guilt, and unsatisfaction. It can be detrimental to a

    student's physical, mental, and emotional health and does not reflect a one's positive qualities. Clearly

    it must be avoided at all costs.

    Or should it?

    Procrastination can have positive effects. In reality, it builds character by teaching the value of

    time and time management, giving students motivation, preparing them for the workforce, and enabling

    one to form strong bonds with other classmates.

    When a student is battling sleep at two in the morning typing a paper, he or she will realize that

    time must not be taken for granted. It should be spent wisely. Those late nights spent cramming every

    single detail about the organelles in an animal cell into your brain will teach you that two hours should

    not have been spent scrolling through your newsfeed on Facebook. Making a powerpoint on the

    morning of your presentation will make it clear to you that half an hour should've been spent for this,

    instead of coordinating your outfit. In this way procrastination will make you understand how much

  • time should be alotted for different tasks and how valuable time truly is.

    Next, procrastination serves as a concrete motivator for students. When a student is answering

    an activity sheet in a relaxed environment, there is no pressure to get the task done right away, as

    opposed to when the teacher has just entered the classroom. An environment with time pressure will

    push students to work harder and faster because a higher expectation must be met: there is an

    assignment that needs to be accomplished within a tight timeframe.

    Procrastination will expose students to alternative working conditions, preparing them for the

    world beyond school wherein difficult tasks may need to be done in a limited amount of time. It also

    prepares one to be able to work with others. Students will develop communication skills, specifically in

    group work, wherein they need to effectively exchange and organize their plans and ideas. Cooperation

    and collaboration are also practiced through procrastination. This act gives students a venue to

    excersise being calm while coordinating with others to achieve one common goal. Aside from this,

    students' creativity will also be enriched for the reason that they will be forced to find alternative plans

    that fit their restricted timeframe. Furthermore, it builds maturity for students: they will learn to be

    accountable for whatever the consequences they may face individually, or as a group.

    Although it can be a stressful experience, procrastination can actually make academic life more

    fun and entertaining. It is a topic that many if not all sudents can relate to, a platform for sharing

    hilarious anecdotes. Memories are made with classmates, and stories that will be fondly looked back on

    and laughed about are born. Friends can bond during those wee hours of the morning when they are

    constructing a scale model of the Great Wall of China, both experiencing an unforgettable part of

    school life.

    Lastly, procrastination can be fulfilling. You'll never forget that estatic feeling of the burden

    being lifted from your shoulders when you finally finished that essay. Once you're done with that

    project and submit it on time, you'll be overcome with wonderful and relieved emotion. Nothing can

    quite compare the sweet victory of pulling off an all-nighter.

  • value time

    work under pressure

    learn the importance of organization

    builds character

    stories to share

    1. what is procrastination? Why do students do this and what can it do? Is it all bad

    2. Time value realize something taken for granted

    3. pressure as a motivator no push if in a relaxed environment

    4. stories to share bonding with other students who can relate, make classmates' life more amuse,

    entertain others

    5. recap procrastina

  • Bianca Insigne

    Maria Karaan

    Communication in English I

    July 8, 2013

    The Positive Effects of Procrastination

    Procrastination: the act of delaying something that needs to be done until the very last minute.

    This is something that all students are bound to experience at least once in their lifetime and is an act

    looked down upon by parents, teachers, and even students themselves. From my experiences, there are

    five causes to procrastination. First, there is poor memory. There are just some times when one will

    completely forget about an assignment, and only remember it the day before the deadline. The second

    cause is terrible time management skills. An example would be when half an an hour is spent making a

    to-do list, and only a measely fifteen minutes are alotted for studying for a major test the next day.

    Basically a student will spend too much time on trivial tasks, instead of the more important one at hand.

    Third, we have something closely related: inability to effectively prioritize. Students who fall under

    this category don't know which things to put first and end up giving more value to what can really be

    done later. Fourth we have uncooperative group mates, a completely undesriable fate we never want to

    experience when projects must be done with classmates. You want to get started, but not alone, so you

    don't start at all; that is, until the deadline is dreadfully near. Lastly we have my most hated cause: the

    disappearance or inexistance of inspiration and or motivation. This basically speaks for itself.

    Whatever the reason, for putting important things off until the last minute, it seems clear that

    procrastination is simply bad because it can result in immense loads of stress, sleep deprivation, guilt,

    and unsatisfaction. It can be detrimental to a student's physical, mental, and emotional health. Clearly

    it must be avoided at all costs.

    Or should it?

    Procrastination can have positive effects. In reality, it builds character by teaching the value of

  • time and time management, giving students motivation, preparing them for the workforce, and enabling

    one to form strong bonds with other classmates.

    When a student is battling sleep at two in the morning typing an essay, he or she will realize that

    time must not be taken for granted. It should be spent wisely. Those late nights spent cramming every

    single detail about the organelles in an animal cell into your brain will teach you that two hours should

    not have been spent scrolling through your newsfeed on Facebook. Making a powerpoint on the

    morning of your presentation will make it clear to you that half an hour should've been spent for this,

    instead of coordinating your outfit. In this way procrastination will make you understand how much

    time should be alotted for different tasks and how valuable time truly is.

    Next, procrastination serves as a concrete motivator for students. When a student is answering

    an activity sheet in a relaxed environment, there is no pressure to get the task done right away, as

    opposed to when the teacher has just entered the classroom. An environment with time pressure will

    push students to work harder and faster because there is an assignment that needs to be accomplished

    within a tight timeframe.

    Procrastination will expose students to alternative working conditions, preparing them for the

    world beyond school wherein difficult tasks may need to be done in a limited amount of time. It also

    prepares one to be able to work with others. Students will develop communication skills, specifically in

    group work, wherein they need to effectively exchange and organize their plans and ideas. Cooperation

    and collaboration are also practiced through procrastination. This act gives students a venue to

    excersise being calm while coordinating with others to achieve one common goal.

    Although it can be a stressful experience, procrastination can actually make academic life more

    fun and entertaining. It is a topic that many if not all sudents can relate to, a platform for sharing

    hilarious anecdotes. Memories are made with classmates, and stories that will be fondly looked back on

    and laughed about are born. Friends can bond during those wee hours of the morning when they are

    both experiencing an unforgettable part of school life.

  • Lastly,