Workbook: Bridging the Gaps Residency

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WorkbookBridging the Gaps ResidencySwansea University 2012-2013with Fern ThomasThe Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands is a constructed mobile time travelling research unit. Formed to explore what it is like to look at the world now from a different perspective (through its ability to time travel), its core aim is also to explore or enter into unknown lands to see what can be found there, what emerges that we do not yet know. In this context, research is understood as an ongoing quest that is not concluded or resolved, but rather something that is built upon, and continuously oscillating forward.The Institute is centred around an enquiry into the imagination and its role in how we engage, believe, discover, exchange, and be in the world. From September 2012 until June 2013 the Institute had its base at Swansea University where it was given the opportunity to engage with and respond to research across many fields and disciplines within the wide research community. This was in the role of artist in residence and working with Bridging the Gaps, a programme which facilitates interdisciplinary research at Swansea University.The following is an account, a reflection, a proposal some fact some fiction, relating to the time spent by the Institute at Swansea University.When reading the account please be aware that for ease of communication and to not over-complicate what is already a complicated existence as an artist in this context, it was not always revealed to the people I met that I was lead researcher at the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands or, indeed, that I could time travel.Fern ThomasLead ResearcherInstitute for Imagined Futures & Unknown LandsJuly 2013The idea of centres of knowledge is interesting; the gravitational pull of questioning, searching and exploration. The particular kind of energy generated in the discovery of an idea.The soundtrack for this document should be something that evokes the sounds of an expedition. As if you were travelling into unknown territory. Something that speaks of changing landscapes, diverse terrain. Perhaps long low notes of stringed instruments, abstracted auditory gestures that invite you to retreat into yourself and reflect on the notion of being a stranger moving through an unknown land. The Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands was given a desk in Singleton Abbey, the hub for administration at the University and the source of the history of the university itself, having belonged tothe Swansea industrialist family, the Vivians. The abbeys old stables (a site now for more administration) has a bell which echoes down the stone walkways, carrying the students and staff into the next hour of their day, and, at lonely weekends it bridges long distances to call for them in their beds. The Institute was in a shared office. In the space were the inherited remnants of a past project and general shared office items such as internal mail envelopes and staples. I brought in objects and images to pin up as if setting a declaration of a proposed territory of working. Tools that I carry with me, like a walker and her survival blanket. I was the stranger, the outsider. I did not have a calendar on my wall or a framed image of my family. I had a gigantic poster of my hand holding a ceramic fragment, glass magic lantern slides of a lion and beeswax and books about arctic expeditions. These objects in this environment formed the temporary base for the Institute and its research.I would sit at the desk and think about the possibilities; the vast potential of the artist being in a space such as this with its wide ranging, world changing research. I was here as a member of the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands, a research unit amongst countless other research units across the campus except mine was fictional.*Before leaping into a project I needed to gather the substance, find out what was at the university, how does it function? How does it fit together? How do people meet and exchange ideas? Where is the space for a response from the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands? It was a looking at the phenomenology of the place.In Goethean Observation the first stage of observation is called Exact Sense Perception characterized by a detailed observation of all the bare facts of the phenomenon that are available to our ordinary senses. An aspect of this is to ignore some knowledge, for example the name of things.1 It was, in a way, easy to ignore the name of things because I was moving though an unfamiliar world. I became interested in the way the buildings functioned, the signage used, how research staff personalized their doors. I was interested in exploring the vessel of the universitys research before I could attempt to look inside. *though the substance is very real.1 Isis Brook, Goethean Science as a way to read landscape, Landscape Research, vol.23, no.1, 1998 I became wanderer, explorer, a person in a liminal existence. I found that working in an office environment I would write emails with an urgency of the office worker so had to stop. Instead, when I didnt have a meeting to go to, I would start my working day at the university at 5 oclock when most people had gone and move through the empty corridors and quiet grounds. I preferred it when it rained so I could perpetuate my role as the outsider and observe this world from under my hood. Though there were times also when I tried to blend in. This is kind of the existence of the artist in residence. It does not start at 9am and finish at 5pm; instead it permeates the day and affects everything you do. It is beyond being in resident in a certain place, it could be when you walk, you are in residence in the park you walk through, or on the bus, or when you are doing the dishes. It is like leasing your inner thought space to this task.The breadth of engaging research at the university was overwhelming. As an artist and as an Institute (for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands) which is future oriented and focused on how we shape our world, the potential was endless. Each research projectpresented a space of wonder as researchers,absorbed by their fascinations, offer new ways of looking at the world.Knowledge and our perception of knowledge is a source of fascination within the work of the Institute. What defines knowledge?How do we know?Fascination is also key. This is where I felt I could speak the same language as the people I met. A usual starting point of a process for the Institute is to occupy the library, to allow books to be discovered. To pick one by chance and to enter into realms of knowledge. The cartography section is often a favourite, where ancient maps can lead one into unknown and imagined lands.At Swansea University a library book was opened at random (perhaps not random, as maybe I was instinctively drawn to a once-loved-but-perhaps-not-so-much-in-the-last-twenty-years-looking-book) and revealed this image titled Instrumentation in Deep-Sea Biological Research.Both the title and the image were evocative. Instrumentation. It was a beautiful technical word, it felt active and honest. An instrument for research. This is what I needed to form.This discovered image seemed like a sign pointing me towards considering an instrument that would act as a framework for the journey of the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands whilst at the university. I liked the idea of something mining (unobtrusively) the depths of the sea in pursuit of new knowledge or better, new understandings. A vessel that was submerged into darkness, into a world that is in the most part largely unknown, in its act of research.[submerged / searching / underworlds / innerworlds / the depths of understanding / a process taking you to the heart of the substance]It was clear that the Institute needed to charter a vessel for its own deep sea exploration and it needed to be able to time travel. It was to be used as a strategy, to invite researchers to be part of it, to shape it. I invited researchers to say what they thought should be onboard the vessel, what should be taken into the future what is needed? This included thinking about the design, the functions, the optimum conditions for future-thinking. I thought that this would open up discussions about the future connections between research now for the future then. If it had to be put into an institutional phrasing; it was like an exercise.I offered the plans of a potential time travelling deep sea vessel which could be labelled, changed, corrected (some parts were made of a camera flash, a bell and a record player - thanks to Aled Simons who helped design it, though they were just to give an impression of a suggested layout)Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown LandsTime Travelling Deep Sea Exploration VesselCALL FoR PARTICIPAnTSThe Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel, chartered by the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands, is an exciting new development in time travel and future preservation.Aboard the vessel will be housed the most significant, dynamic and challenging representations of research necessary for the benefit of the future. The vessel will also act as a living and working area for up to 100 people. Researchers are invited to offer suggestions for what they think is needed for the future. This can range from specimens, certain kinds of knowledge or particular kinds of technology. Maybe you want to suggest what sort of spaces are needed, the different functions of the vessel, the material it is made out of, or the kind of living and interactive spaces required for the people aboard. It is probable that your suggestion will be connected to your current research.It may be that your suggestion is at risk of not existing in the future and so putting it aboard the vessel will guarantee its future existence. or perhaps your suggestion does not yet exist yet as it may be, for example, bound by time and space or gravity, but please be free and experimental with your ideas in relation to what you think we need for the future as we at the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands are committed to making it happen. There will also be an on board library and so we also invite participants to suggest a book for the library, this can be of any discipline or genre.There are no weight or size restrictions on board, and indeed, your suggestion may be something that is invisible, but everything will be accommodated for. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity (unless you are already experienced in the art of time travel and we have met before.)Please send your suggestion / diagram / drawing / notes / rough sketch/ alongside your book title with your name and department via Internal Mail to:Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Landsc/o Bridging the GapsSingleton AbbeyPlease note: the diagram above is only a suggestion of a layout. Your input will help shape the final outcome of the vessel.Suggestions for the Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel will close at the end of March 2013. A final version will be made public soon after. (Please also be aware that we are currently awaiting further funding in order for the building of the Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel to commence) Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown LandsTime Travelling Deep Sea Exploration VesselCALL FoR PARTICIPAnTSThe Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel, chartered by the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands, is an exciting new development in time travel and future preservation.Aboard the vessel will be housed the most significant, dynamic and challenging representations of research necessary for the benefit of the future. The vessel will also act as a living and working area for up to 100 people. Researchers are invited to offer suggestions for what they think is needed for the future. This can range from specimens, certain kinds of knowledge or particular kinds of technology. Maybe you want to suggest what sort of spaces are needed, the different functions of the vessel, the material it is made out of, or the kind of living and interactive spaces required for the people aboard. It is probable that your suggestion will be connected to your current research.It may be that your suggestion is at risk of not existing in the future and so putting it aboard the vessel will guarantee its future existence. or perhaps your suggestion does not yet exist yet as it may be, for example, bound by time and space or gravity, but please be free and experimental with your ideas in relation to what you think we need for the future as we at the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands are committed to making it happen. There will also be an on board library and so we also invite participants to suggest a book for the library, this can be of any discipline or genre.There are no weight or size restrictions on board, and indeed, your suggestion may be something that is invisible, but everything will be accommodated for. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity (unless you are already experienced in the art of time travel and we have met before.)Please send your suggestion / diagram / drawing / notes / rough sketch/ alongside your book title with your name and department via Internal Mail to:Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Landsc/o Bridging the GapsSingleton AbbeyPlease note: the diagram above is only a suggestion of a layout. Your input will help shape the final outcome of the vessel.Suggestions for the Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel will close at the end of March 2013. A final version will be made public soon after. (Please also be aware that we are currently awaiting further funding in order for the building of the Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel to commence) My process of engagement begun by being present at a stand for the universitys research week where I had large print outs of the plans and handouts inviting participation. I would explain to people who passed by the process, though little interest was shown, one day however, a long and detailed conversation was had with an Astrophysics student who discussed the technicalities of time travel and the viability of my idea.I hoped to encourage drawing, playfulness, an expanse where anything is possible, and in this process I could start to meet researchers with whom I could take the conversation further. The invitation called for researchers to send the Institute their contribution in internal mail (to try and avoid the familiar format of computer response). But nothing came. The Institute did a live work at a lunch event for researchers where I introduced the idea, then there was a follow up email, there was a direct invitation to people I had met, there were tweets, there were re-tweets, and acknowledging that much of the research community uses twitter to communicate I (reluctantly) compressed the whole experience into a tweet friendly response format. But nothing came. I hoped that things had got lost in the internal mail. I would check the post room, behind the bags, under the shelves, in case contributions had become misplaced. I worried about this vessel that was soon to depart heading for the future. It had nothing on board. Why were people not responding? Was this something that needed its own research study?I found that when I introduced myself as artist in residence as I moved around the University, people didnt even know there were artists in residence. [Was it that people didnt know how to engage with an artist? I was told from the outset that there would be much opposition, but I didnt even encounter that. There was nothing. Silent opposition perhaps. This wasnt a new way of working for me or the Institute, there is a history of engagement. Was it that our languages differed? My emails out to researchers had sometimes been suggested that they were too artistic. But an email canbe an artwork, it is a form ofcommunication, and how it is phrased or the image used can create a particular kind of experience...?.]I then held an open day event in one of the research rooms. By mid-morning there was only a penguin on board. A vital but lonely contribution. Then the Mona Lisa was added by Professor of Computer Science Harold Thimbleby (who wanted to time travel to steal it at an appropriate moment and also declared that with the time travelling technology he would find Atlantis). Professor Thimbleby sent some PhD students to the space, they appeared to delight at the idea adding a disco room, casino, fountain and running track to the vessel, using all the colouring pencils available to them, another PhD student suggested to use the vessel as a problem solving space to solve all conflict between the worlds religions by not letting anyone leave until it was done.Dear Researchers, You may remember that at the award winners lunch as part of the recent Research Week I introduced you to a project that I am working on (loud gong, dead bird) as part of my residency at Swansea University with Bridging the Gaps. For my project I am amassing key elements of research that is happening across the University and am working with an imaginative form that houses the research in one place. Within my work as an artist I have founded the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands, a mobile research unit which, within its playful title, offers a genuine framework for enquiry into how we envision a future. The Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel (image below) is an imaginative concept which offers a new way of looking at the research at Swansea University and invites researchers to consider what are the most significant aspects of their research which they think should be represented and carried into the future? You are invited to suggest what you think should be aboard this time travelling vessel. For your participation you will be rewarded and acknowledged and the final version of the vessel will be made available across the university soon afterwards. The results of this process will also be shared at the international Maritime conference happening in Swansea in October of this year. The deadline has been extended to May 15th and you can either send your suggestions to me via email or via internal mail. Take a look at the website for more information about the Institute and please see further detailed information about the Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel below: Many thanks, Fern Fern Thomas Artist in Residence Bridging the Gaps Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands c/o Bridging the Gaps, Singleton Abbey imaginedfuturesunknownlands@gmail.com www.imaginedfuturesunknownlands.org F U T U R E T H I N K I N G T H R O U G H R E S E A R C H Call for Researchers at Swansea University of any discipline and level Bridging the Gaps and the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands 01. Live work as part of research week. (image by Dr. Richard Johnston)02. Invitation for participation03. Further amended posters and invites04. Follow up email05. You could win a golden ticket. Strategy to encourage participation where a golden ticket to be on board the time travelling deep sea exploration vessel could be won06. Poster illegally posted around the university advertising open day event07. Further advertising for participation08. Space set up awaiting engagement09. Working in the space set up awaiting engagement10. First contribution from PhD student Rhian Morris.11. Professor Harold Thimbleby drawing out his contribution12. Poster for contributors to put up in their work space13. PhD students of Computer Science drawing their contributions14. PhD students of Computer Science15. Whiteboard of contributions16. Tweet friendly version of interactionRESEARCHERS & POST GRADS You could W I N a G O L D E N T I C K E T to be on board the Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration Vessel chartered by the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands Just call in and let us know what you think should be onboard the vessel that will represent your research. there are cake and biscuits also. Call in the SURF Room in Fulton House between 10 - 4 today! www.imaginedfuturesunknownlands.org Name: Department: Contact: 1. What research should be on board? 2. What book would you put on the on board library? 3. Anything else? A room with a particular function perhaps? 4. Do you need to draw something? 01050913020610140307111504081216Parallel to the process of attempting to charter the time travelling deep sea exploration vessel, meetings were arranged with researchers where I could learn about their specialisms. I had narrowed down the Institutes interest of research whilst being at the University to the term of Conservation. It hinted towards a particular area of exploration whilst being flexible enough to incorporate other interpretations of the word. A few people responded to my Conservation word and so met with researchers in Cyberterrorism, Sustainable Aquatic Research, older People and Ageing Research and Development network and archivists from the Richard Burton Archive. Some meetings were strange, the world of meetings is strange, not that I am a stranger to meetings. It felt like it was not always the right form for meeting, despite its name. Perhaps on a rollercoaster, or in a shared endeavor to put up a tent is when you really get to meet someone, the incidental moments. It was one day whilst leaving a meeting in the biosciences area in the Wallace building that I was introduced to staff from the Swansea Ecology Research Team. In their office, or rather outside on the large windows, there were window-attaching bird feeders, which were surrounded by birds flying and feeding back and fore whilst staff sat at their desks or carried on with their working day. This became a key moment for me as I realised that I was being given an insight into the relationship between the researchers and their work, I could see it. The birds feeding on the windows were part of their everyday working life, it was integrated. I had so far seen things on screens or spoken in offices but this act of feeding the local birds, although of course connected to the research of the SERT group, was a human act. I could understand it and I could empathise with it. I was then introduced to Dr. Dan Forman, Programme Director and Senior Tutor in Behavioural Ecology of Mammals and Birds in the School of Biosciences. He was energetic, enthusiastic, and totally engaging. He wore colourful trousers, a hat with an otter on, and, importantly, when you walked down the corridor where his office is based, his door would be open. On reflection I realise that seeing the birds being fed from the office window reignited an engagement with birds, previously explored in past projects. I became interested in facilitating a multi-disciplinary approach to birds in biology, in history, in ecology, in psychology, in well-being, in literature, in geography, in Egyptology, drawing on any of the research that could connect To focus on the human relationship or human understanding of birds and our connection to them that would work towards questions around human responsibility and the conservation of other than human beings. Paper flyers left around the university buildings inviting a response (of which there were none). I was interested in using the phrase There are no more birds as a trigger for engagement.Flyers left in the Wallace buildingFollowing two pages: Recording the dawn chorus at 6am in the grounds of the university and sunrise in Singleton park the same morning. May 2013Photograph of a man feeding pigeons in Uplands, taken when walking home from the universityI imagined a world in the future where there were no more birds, they were gone. What did that mean? I wanted to offer a space in which this question could be considered.there are no more birds what does that mean? I continued to meet with Dan Forman who spoke about negative myths surrounding animals that are still believed and therefore affects our attitude to them, he told me about public engagement that he and his team work with, his love of otters and the amazing capacities of bats. We talked about how an artist could respond to the issues that his research is engaged with. He lent me a book with a cd of birdsongs and absorbed me into his fascinations, what he felt was important in his work (and his life, as there was no distinction.)I was contacted by Professor Gareth Stratton from Applied-Sports Technology Exercise and Medicine (A- STEM), an area with which I must admit I did not think would be a space for the Institute to engage with, until I met Gareth. His work was all about how we connect with the environment, a consciousness easily linked with the field occupied by Dan and colleagues. Awareness of how we move, the benefits of movement with a particular emphasis on children and encouraging them to engage in health and well-being (I must apologise herefor perhaps not describing what bothDan, Gareth and others do fully, buthope I can communicate an element oftheir work). It was the way that Gareth spoke about his work, with fascination and energy that immediately made it accessible and the conversation about the value of artists interpreting and furthering research.Similarly with Professor Vanessa Burholt from the Centre for Innovative Ageing, the way she spoke about her research and how it benefits others felt really important and offered the potential for further creative engagement. we can each be our own mobile research unitAll of these conversations were, in a way, the beginnings of conversations. The residency facilitated the possibility to meet with these researchers and so now the conversations and potential projects can develop over the time that they need beyond the timescale of the residency. True engagement and considered processes need time, they cannot be rushed. The structure of many universities without a dedicated art department leaves little space for engagement with art. Or that has been my impression. It is such an open ended non-fixed-outcome-led process that it is perhaps perceived as being too slippery to pin down. Outcomes come in many shapes and sizes and are perhaps not seen until months later, or until you turn something on its head, but they are most definitely there. I encountered much creativity and imagination across the university, Dr. Richard Johnston, for example, from the College of Engineering was making beautiful expanding images from X-Ray CT scanned objects from crystals, to meteorites, to pumpkins all of which he wrote as a list directly on the window as he and his students scanned them. There is real wonder in this act as they discover the internal structures of what they have scanned.Despite this every day engagement with imagination at the university, the Institute for Imagined Futures & Unknown Lands had a peripheral existence whilst being based at there as it struggled to find a space to be seen. Was it simply because it was labeled as art?. As it comes to the end of its expedition at Swansea University, the Institute has had time to reflect on the gathered substance and experience. This will continue to further its own research accompanied by new colleagues with whom the conversations can now continue. To those who met with me and engaged with the ideas of the Institute, I am very grateful.In places like universities, where everyone talks too rationally, it is necessary for a kind of enchanter to appear. Joseph Beuys, Twentieth Century German Artist, founder of Social Sculpture other notesLive work for performance lecture how to make a submarine and influence people: a users guide to exploring the unknown alongside Howard Ingham and Graham Hartill as part of the university wide research week. Three attendees. (extracts:)Collaboration with Cyberterrorism researchers Deepa Madhu and Dr. Stuart Macdonald on task of visualising their researchParticipation in Coming of Age exhibition connected to the school of medicine[a gong is hit:]the effects of sound in a spacethe transformation of thinkingor a transformation of a space in which to thinkhow we enter a spacehow the chairs have a slight yet significant curvethe light and how we feel in this light[]a response to the history, the feel of a spacespending time in a space and seeing what is neededthis space, the old prison cells in Oxford town hallthe need to connect with a landscape, a new environment in order to understandquestioning, touching , being immerseda physical connection, a dialogue between body and other be it river, animal, spacea process of positioning myself in the world where do I fit in? what am I connected to? what are my questions? What can I do?[]research is constant explorationresearch is like carrying your question inside and allowing it to meet, sometimes quietly, sometimes loudly, with everything you come into contact with shaping what you originally thoughtresearch is like holding on to the wonder of the childFinding the poetry in the situation. Like attempting to print a meteorite in 3D and it breaks the machine. It is this belief. A belief in fiction. The use of the imagination that opens up possibilities.The power of art is the power of the image. Image as a key, as an opening up process. An invisible dialogue within. Like alchemy. []Index of Keywords, Moments, and People:Gestation,Singleton Abbey,Dan Forman,Time Travelling Deep Sea Exploration,Howard Ingham,Plastic Frogs,When the birds have gone,Research,Richard Johnston,Sensory awareness,Cyberterrorism,SURF Room,Conservation,Bird Calls,Amanda Rogers,Dreamer,Goethean Observation,Outsider,Archive,Gareth Stratton,Kasia Szpakowska,Perceptual modes,Gargoyles,Bridget Riley,Imagination,Missing Otter,Rhian Morris,Genius loci,Elizabeth Bennett,Opera singing humanities lecturer,Phenomenology,Vanessa Burholt,Dying plants and Dalek,Expedition,Isis Brook,Maria Cheshire-Allen,Astral Tincture,Andrea Buck,Vivian Family,Wanderer,Louise Cleobury,Mapping,How to build a submarine and influence people,Judith Phillips,Seagull filmed from underneath,Sea Level 2035,Coming of Age,Aditee Mitra,Observation,Steve Stewart-Williams,Sybil Crouch,Meetings,Artist / Outsider,Prue Thimbleby,Huw Bowen,Locked Doors,Hidden Spaces,The man whose office looked really interesting but couldnt find again,Skull from Marie Rose,The physics of sound,Gong and dead bird,Glimpses into labs,Acronyms,Golden ticket,Liza Penn-Thomas,Library Fine,Harold Thimbleby,Amazon gift voucher,The potential of Raymond Williams,Stoats that eat cows ears,Lectures,Performance,E.O.Wilson,Maths Clock,Wind Tunnel,Interdisciplinary research,Being lost in the engineering building,From our own correspondent,Conversation,Revealed through research,Deepa Madhu,Performance,Lonely chair,Intervention,The water use in UK,Potential,Stuart MacDonald,Egyptian Stone Pillow,Substance,Intention,Visibility,Invisibility.Many thanks to Bridging the Gaps, funded by EPSRC, who made the residency possible. Thank you to Andrea Buck, Rhian Morris, Professor Harold Thimbleby plus Sybil Crouch, Professor Huw Bowen and Liza Penn-Thomas.Thanks to the researchers I met and to those I worked with, with who many of the conversations continue:Dr. Dan FormanDr. Amanda Rogers, Professor Vanessa Burholt, Professor Gareth Stratton, Dr. Kasia Szpakowska, Deepa Madhu, Dr. Stuart Macdonald, Dr. Aditee Mitra, Dr. Richard Johnston, Dr. Louise Cleobury, Dr. Steve Stewart-Williams, Maria Cheshire-Allen, Jen Pearson, Patrick Oladimeji, Liam Betsworth, Tom Owen, Yunqiu LiAdditional thanks to: Prue Thimbleby and Elizabeth BennettAnd for essential collaborative discussion and problem solving thanks to Howard Ingham, Aled Simons, Jason Cartwright, Becky Williams and Owen Griffiths (and for her long-distance yet enduring wisdom, Shelley Sacks).Particular thanks also to Dan Forman and Gareth Stratton for our conversations around the potential of imaginative thinking and artistic process in encouraging new forms of engagement with new audiences relating to their respective fields. It was most encouraging.www.imaginedfuturesunknownlands.orgimaginedfuturesunknownlands@gmail.com printed on recycled paper

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