Rainwater Harvesting (RWH): A quantitative analysis of world publications during

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1.Rainwater Harvesting (RWH): A quantitativeanalysis of world publications during2001-2012Adithya Kumari, H, Associate ProfessorHydar Ali, Research ScholarMahadevamurthy,…

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1.Rainwater Harvesting (RWH): A quantitativeanalysis of world publications during2001-2012Adithya Kumari, H, Associate ProfessorHydar Ali, Research ScholarMahadevamurthy, M, Research ScholarDepartment of Studies in Library and Information Science,University of Mysore, Manasagangotri,Mysore - 5700062. INTRODUCTIONAll the known civilizations have flourished with water source as thebase and it is true in the present context too. Availability of drinking waterand provision of sanitation facilities are the basic minimum requirements forhealthy living. Water supply and sanitation, being the two most importanturban services, have wide ranging impact on human health, quality of life,environment and productivity. Despite the technological advancements, theglobal scenario still remains grim, as all the inhabitants of the world do nothave access to safe water and adequate sanitation.Rapid population growth, combined with industrialisation,urbanisation, agricultural intensification and water intensive lifestyles isresulting in a global water crisis. In 2000, at least 1.1 billion of the world’speople – about one in five – did not have access to safe water. Asia contains65 per cent of the population without safe water and Africa 28 per cent.During the 1990s, there were some positive developments: about 438 millionpeople in developing countries gained access to safe water but due to rapidpopulation growth, the number of urban dwellers lacking access to safe waterincreased by nearly 62 million(6).Cont... 3. Among the various technologies to augment freshwaterresources, rainwater harvesting and utilisation is a decentralised,environmentally sound solution, which can avoid many environmentalproblems often caused by conventional large-scale projects usingcentralised approaches. Rainwater harvesting is a technology used forcollecting and storing rainwater from rooftops, the land surface or rockcatchments using simple techniques such as jars and pots as well asmore complex techniques such as underground check dams. Water isessential for the environment, food security and sustainabledevelopment.Cont... 4. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY To examine the growth of Rainwater harvesting literatureover the period [2001-2012] To study the geographical distribution of the researchoutput To study the research profile most productive authors To examine the pattern of output according to prolificInstitutions and the impact of the output as seen byRelative citation Impact (RCI) and Average Citation perpaper (ACPP) To study research output in context of different subjectcategories. 5. METHODOLOGY AND SOURCESFor analyzing the worldwide Rainwater harvestingliterature, the Web of Science database was used to retrievepublication data published during the period 2001–2012. Weused the term "Rainwater harvesting" to search through WOSdatabases. A total of 370 publications were identified in WOSdatabase as being Rainwater harvesting research. Finally, theevaluation was based on parameters including authors, citation,countries, institutions, growth rate, document types, and subjectareas. 6. RESULTSType of documents publishedDuring 2001-2012 scientists contributed 370 items under7 different document categories. Of these 339 (81.08%) werearticles, 40 (10.81%) were proceedings papers and 17 (4.60%)were reviews. Remaining 4 document categories were publishedas meeting abstracts (5), editorial materials (3), letters (3) andNews Items (2). 7. Growth pattern of Publication output4 41815192628204556528301020304050607080902001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Fig 1 - Grouth pattern of Publication output 8. World Output and Ranking of productive countries inRainwater harvesting researchRank Country TP % of TP ICP TC ACPI1 India 66 17.84 18 412 6.242 USA 42 11.35 20 285 6.793 South Africa 38 10.27 7 132 3.474 China 35 9.46 8 228 6.515 Australia 29 7.84 11 105 3.626 England 26 7.03 12 61 2.357 Netherlands 23 6.22 19 98 4.268 South Korea 18 4.87 4 30 1.679 Taiwan 14 3.78 4 37 2.6410 Bangladesh 13 3.51 9 67 5.1511 Canada 12 3.24 5 86 7.1712 Spain 10 2.70 4 47 4.7013 Germany 9 2.43 5 77 8.5614 Kenya 9 2.43 6 125 13.8915 Tanzania 9 2.43 7 49 5.4416 Zimbabwe 9 2.43 5 61 6.78TP= Total Publications, ICP=International Collaborative Papers, TC=Total Citation, ACCI Average Citation Per Item 9. The most publishing authorsSl. No Authors TP % of TP TC ACPI1 VAN RENSBURG LD 11 2.97 10 0.912 HENSLEY M 10 2.70 12 1.203 BUTLER D 8 2.16 27 3.384 HAN M Y 8 2.16 18 2.255 HAN M 7 1.89 10 1.436 LI XY 7 1.89 57 8.147 MEMON FA 7 1.89 22 3.148 ROCKSTROM J 7 1.89 80 11.439 LE ROUX PAL 6 1.62 9 1.5010 SAVENIJE HHG 6 1.62 64 10.6711 TAIGBENU AE 6 1.62 44 7.3312 WARD S 6 1.62 18 3.00 10. Relative Citation Impact (RCI)This indicator was developed by ISI to measures both theinfluence and visibility of a nation’s research in globalperspective. RCI= A Country’s share of world citation/Country’sshare of world publication. RCI=1 indicates that country’s citationrate is equal to world citation rate; RCI>1 indicates that country’scitation rate is higher than world’s citation and RCI

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